Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 19th International Conference on Food Processing & Technology Paris, France.

Day 2 :

Food Technology-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Osama O Ibrahim photo
Biography:

Osama Ibrahim is a highly-experienced Principal Research Scientist with particular expertise in the field of microbiology, molecular biology, food safety, and bio-processing for both pharmaceutical and food ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening /culture improvement; molecular biology and fermentation research for antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids and food flavors; Biochemistry for metabolic pathways and enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bioconversion, and Analytical Biochemistry. Dr. Ibrahim was external research liaison for Kraft Foods with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and microbial screening and holds three bio-processing patents. In January 2005, he accepted an early retirement offer from Kraft Foods and in the same year he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for new startup biotechnology and food companies.

Abstract:

Dietary supplements are products intended to supplement the diet, and are not drugs for disease treatments. They are vitamins, minerals, herbals, botanicals, amino acids, enzymes, metabolites and many other products. Some supplements plays an  important role in health , for example calcium and vitamin D are important for keeping bones strong , and folic acid is important for  pregnant women to prevent certain birth defect in their babies. Dietary supplements are available in the market in the form of tablets, capsules, soft gels, gel caps, powders, drinks and energy bars.  These dietary supplements do not have to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before marketing as required for prescription drugs or over-the counter drugs, but manufacturers must register their manufacturing facilities with the FDA   and are responsible to having evidence that their dietary supplement products are safe and the label claims are not misleading.With a few well define exceptions dietary supplements such as pre-workout for athletics and weight loss products may only be marketed to support structure or function of the body, without claiming to treat a disease or condition, and must include a label that highlight “These statements have not been evaluated by FDA and this product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any diseases

Keynote Forum

Jean-Francois Hocquette

INRA, France

Keynote: The future of artificial meat from cultured cells is uncertain

Time : 10:00-10:30

Food Technology-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jean-Francois Hocquette photo
Biography:

Since 1991, JF Hocquette has been scientist at INRA (the French National Institute of Agricultural Research). His research interest mainly concerns muscle biology as relevant to muscle growth and beef eating quality. His scientific activity resulted in 252 papers, 2 patents, over $5M in grants, mentorship (27 scholars), adjunctship (800 students) and 60 lectures worldwide. In 2014 and 2016, JF Hocquette organized the French Meat R&D congress (150 to 240 attendees). He was involved in EU-programs on meat. He was head of the Herbivore Research Unit (172 staff) and now works for the High Council for Evaluation of Research & Higher Education. JF Hocquette is involved in the activities of the EAAP (European Association for Animal Production) and of the French Meat Academy. JF Hocquette was associate editor of BMC Genomics, edited two EAAP books (#112 & #133) and is currently editor-in-chief of the French Meat R&D Journal (5600 subscribers).

Abstract:

The production of in vitro meat regularly generates media interest because of its potential contribution to feed the growing human population while also protecting the environment and respecting animal life. Proponents of artificial meat have developed a communication strategy which is convincing for young and urban consumers, who do not know animal husbandry, are eager for exciting technologies or who do not know very well the subject. The media have also an important responsibility in advertising artificial meat.However, the majority of experts considers that there are still numerous technological obstacles that have to be overcome to produce in vitro meat: new formulation of culture media, development of giant incubators, safety assessment for human consumption, etc. In reality, it is not sure that artificial meat will soon be on the market due to its high production cost and the need for further research before its commercialization. In addition, even if in vitro meat could eliminate the supposed lack of wellbeing of livestock and has the potential to free up cultivable land, other supposed advantages (such as its lower carbon footprint compared to conventional meat) are questionable and not always agreed upon by the scientific community.In addition, a major problem for the commercialization of in vitro meat would be its acceptance by consumers, although some consumers are ready to taste it at least once. Indeed, the artificial nature of the product goes against the growing demand for natural products in many countries. The consumption of in vitro meat will depend on a conflict of values at an individual or collective level. In fact, a range of other complementary solutions already exist which meet the challenges of food supply in our society and which are certainly faster to develop in the short term, but which are less saleable to the media.

Keynote Forum

Anet Rezek Jambrak

University of Zagreb, Croatia

Keynote: High voltage electrical discharge plasma in extraction processes
Food Technology-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anet Rezek Jambrak photo
Biography:

Anet Rezek Jambrak is currently an Associate professor in the University of Zagreb since September, 2013. She was awarded with a Ph. D degree in Food Science and Technology in 2008. She has 36 peer reviewed papers coined to her name along with 15 other papers, 5 book chapters (Wiley, Springer, Nova-publisher, Elsevier). Her articles are cited over 850 times in Web of Science, Scopus); and > 1100 times in Google Scholar.

Abstract:

With growing knowledge about the importance of food in preserving health, the food industry is challenged to make technological improvements and development of new food products with high nutritional and functional values. Therefore, in recent years food industry is rapidly developing new non-thermal food processing techniques like non-thermal plasma, pulsed electric field, high hydrostatic pressure and high intensity ultrasound1-3. These new non-thermal techniques are effective at room temperature or at slightly elevated, which reduces negative heat effects on the nutrient composition and food quality4-6. However, to get high quality functional food products, based on customer’s needs, it is crucial to enhance food by adding bioactive compounds, isolated from plants. New non-thermal techniques are considered “green” extraction methods for isolation of bioactive compounds, because conventionally used organic solvents for extraction can be replaced by water or other green solvents like D-limonen, dimethylcarbonate (DMC) and others6. High voltage electrical discharge-plasma (HVED) is one of new promising green techniques. Methodology of extraction process using high voltage discharge plasma in liquids includes following: high-voltage discharge in liquids results in a rupture of the cell plant tissue which greatly improves extractions of valuable components from plant material as well as various by-products

  • Workshop

Session Introduction

Ozlem Tokusoglu

Celal Bayar University, Turkey

Title: Food byproduct based functional foods and powders
Speaker
Biography:

Tokusoglu has completed her PhD at Ege University Engineering Faculty, Dept of Food Engineering at 2001. She is currently working as Associate Professor Dr  faculty member  in Celal Bayar University  Engineering Faculty Department of Food Engineering. Tokusoglu performed a visiting scholar at the Food Science and Nutrition Department /University of Florida, Gainesville-Florida-USA during 1999-2000 and  as visiting professor at the School of Food Science, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington,USA during  April-May 2010.  She has published many papers in peer reviewed journals and serving as an editorial board member of selected journals. Tokusoglu published the scientific edited two international book entitled Fruit and Cereal Bioactives: Chemistry, Sources and Applications  and entitled Improved Food Quality with Novel Food Processing by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis,USA Publisher, third book Food By-Product Based Functional Food Powders is in progress; Dr Tokusoglu also published two national books entitled Cacao and Chocolate Science and Technology and  Special Fruit Olive: Chemistry, Quality and Technology. She organized and/or  administered as Conference Chair  at many conferences and congress in various parts of USA and Europe. 

Abstract:

Food by-products in the food industry is characterized by a high ratio of product spesicific waste. Food by-products or food industry shelf-stable co-products as liquid, pomace, or powder forms can be obtained from fruits, vegetables, meats, seafoods, milk and dairy, cereals, nuts, fats and oils processing; drying of by-products and converting them into powder offers a way to preserve them as useful and valuable products. Those above-mentioned by-products may be evaluated as a source of dietary phytochemicals including phenolic antioxidants, carotenoids, bioactive other polyphenols, dietary fibers, as a source of proteins, peptides and aminoacids, may be evaluated as extruded products. as a sources of collagen, gelatin, and as a sources of various food additive materials. However, the some of by-products can be utilized as compost for plants, can be used as animal feed, can be utilized as industrial materials. Nowadays, the potential utilization of the above-mentioned major components has been the focus of attention. owing to their consumption imparts health benefits including certain types of cancer, reduced risk of coronary heart diseases.   Chemoprevention is an active cancer (CA) preventive strategy to inhibit, delay or reverse human carcinogenesis using especially  naturally occurring chemical agents. Dietary supplements and/or food fortification based on food by-product may be alternative for above-mentioned healthy constituents.This workshop presentation discusses food powders derived from food by-products and wastes as well as their chemical characterization, functional properties, their unique bioactive features, enhancing technologies, processing of food by-product powders and utilizations; each section of the presentation covers  antioxidative, anticarcinogenic reports, pharmacological evaluations and clinical studies of nutraceuticals derivatives from food by-products. Dried powdery products derived from fruits and vegetables, meat, seafood, milk and dairy products, cereal by-products and wastes could be utilized in biological interactions, drug interactions, and pharmacological evaluations

Speaker
Biography:

Mirjana menkovska, Ph.D. is full professor at department of food technology and biotechnology at the Institute of animal science, Ss.Cyril and Methodius University (UKIM) in Skopje, Macedonia. Her background is food technology taken at UKIM, where she also took MS degree in Instrumental Analysis in Chemistry and Technology. She took her Ph.D. Degree in Food Technology at the University of Belgrade, Serbia. She was visiting scientist for cereal research at world known centers such as Grain Marketing Research Center in Manhattan, Kansas, USA, Cereal Research Institute in Detmold, Germany and other known European centres. Prof. Menkovska has published more than 150 papers in domestic and foreign scientific journals and has participated at 90 scientific meetings in the country and abroad being member of Organising and Scientific Comittees. She published a book and has also translated scientific books (3) and reviewed scientific (3) books from English into Macedonian language. She teaches Food Instrumental Analysis and Food Quality and Safety, as well as Dieto-prevention and Dieto-therapy at the postgraduate studies. She is National Contact person at EUCheMS-Division of Food Chemistry, and has been long period a member of AACC, RACI, ISEKI and ICC National Delegate. Prof. Menkovska was Rector Candidate at UKIM and candidate for Regular and Corresponding Member of MANU.

Abstract:

Contamination with mycotoxins are the main worldwide concern by food/feed industries and health organizations to ensure the safety of both human and animals.Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites produced by fungus kingdom. Fungi under, aerobic and optimum condition of humidity and temperature consume nutrients for proliferation and mycotoxin secretion. There are six major groups of mycotoxins produced by different genus and species of fungi. The production of these mycotoxins depends on the surrounding intrinsic and extrinsic environments and these mycotoxins are vary in their toxicity depending on the organism infected (animal or human) and susceptibility. This presentation will highlight fungal ecology and factors that affect mycotoxins production by these fungi in agriculture crops as a raw materials for both food and feed industries, the chemistry of major known mycotoxins, illness symptoms by these mycotoxins, methods of detection, and regulatory guidance to prevent or minimize the toxicity of these mycotoxins in food/feed products and economic loss.

  • Oral Session 2
Speaker

Chair

Osama O Ibrahim

BioInnovation, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Farid Chemat

Avignon University, France

Session Introduction

Ozlem Turgay

Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Turkey

Title: Investigation of using chitosan for preservation chicken and quail eggs
Speaker
Biography:

Ozlem Turgay was born in Gaziantep/Turkey on 04.05.1969. She graduated Istanbul University, Veterinary Faculty in 1992. She is still working as Prof. Dr. at Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University. She is a mother of a son and a daughter.

Abstract:

In this study, chitosan coating materials were prepared with different organic acids (acetic acid, lactic acid, and propionic acid). Phenolic compounds (gallic acid and cafeic acid) were added to this coating formula. With the prepared coating material, quail and chicken eggs covered. Coated and uncoated samples were contaminated with Salmonella enteritidis and Escherichia coli for microbial analysis. Antimicrobial and shelf-life studies (weight loss, haugh unit, yolk index, albumen pH, mineral substance analysis, shell breaking strength and microbial analysis) of the coating formulations that we have prepared investigated. All chitosan coated chicken and quail egg samples were showed greater interior (weight loss, haugh unit, yolk index, albumen pH, microbiological analysis) and exterior quality (shell breaking strength) than uncoated (p<0.05). Coating with chitosan enriched phenolic compounds of the egg samples were caused statistically significant anti-microbiological effects on microbiological (E. coli and Salmonella enteritidis) parameters (p<0.05).

Considering all of the data determined from the present study, it was found that chitosan coated preserves interior quality and shell breaking in eggs.

Speaker
Biography:

Jean-Claude Laguerre has been working as Faculty at UniLaSalle since 1991. He obtained his Ph.D. diploma in Process Engineering (1991) from ENSIA of Massy France (currently AgroParisTech). From 1995 he is the coordinator of the specialty "Industrial organization in the agro-food industry" which is dedicated to the 5th year Agriculture students at UniLaSalle. He teaches various courses in the field of agro-food processes. He is member of the research unit "Transformation and Agro-resources" at UniLaSalle. His research activities focus on thermal and microwave processes. He has participated in several European research programs as task manager or scientific leader. He regularly collaborates with food companies by helping them to develop and/or optimize their processes. He is co-author of 15 articles published in peer reviewed journals and 17 papers presented in international conferences. Up to date he supervised or co-supervised 1 post-doctoral fellow, 3 Ph.D. students as well as 9 M.Sc. students.

 

Abstract:

Fruits and vegetables are the main source of food wastes. In France, apples are the most common fruits that are discarded when they are out of caliber, thus it seems relevant to find techniques able to valorize and conserve them so that they are not rejected as wastes at early stage. We show here the optimization of a combined drying technique microwave/hot air (MWHA) for apple Malus domestica sp., in terms of energy consumption, physico-chemical and organoleptic properties. The apples were cultivated in a farm located at 55 km northern Paris (France). The MWHA drying was performed in a multi-energy oven air-o-speed®. The optimization approach was the Iconographic Correlation (CORICO) that provides original models connecting the studied responses to the experimental design factors thanks to several logical interactions between factors. The factors were: specific microwave power (SPi: 1 to 1.5 W/g), maximum specific microwave power (SPmax: 4.91 to 7.02 W/g), hot air temperature (THA: 40 to 50°C), drying duration (d: 180 to 540 minutes), sample thickness (T: 15 to 27mm). The responses of experimental design were: final humidity dry basis (X), water activity (aw), specific energy consumption (SEC in kWh/kg), crispness evaluated by means of a penetration test with a TA.XTplus Texture Analyser , colorimetric values of dried apples: lightness (L*), the chroma (C*), and the hue angle (h). The organoleptic properties measured were fresh apple flavor, acidity, crispness and off-flavors. CORICO provided models giving good accuracy for most of the responses (0,89 < R2 < 0,99). Optimal conditions were determined to minimize energy consumption, final humidity, off-flavors and to maximize other organoleptic characteristics. The validation of the optimal conditions found confirmed that the models were accurate and predictable.

Speaker
Biography:

Since 1991, JF Hocquette has been scientist at INRA (the French National Institute of Agricultural Research). His research interest mainly concerns muscle biology as relevant to muscle growth and beef eating quality. His scientific activity resulted in 252 papers, 2 patents, over $5M in grants, mentorship (27 scholars), adjunctship (800 students) and 60 lectures worldwide. In 2014 and 2016, JF Hocquette organized the French Meat R&D congress (150 to 240 attendees). He was involved in EU-programs on meat. He was head of the Herbivore Research Unit (172 staff) and now works for the High Council for Evaluation of Research & Higher Education. JF Hocquette is involved in the activities of the EAAP (European Association for Animal Production) and of the French Meat Academy. JF Hocquette was associate editor of BMC Genomics, edited two EAAP books (#112 & #133) and is currently editor-in-chief of the French Meat R&D Journal (5600 subscribers).

Abstract:

The current assessment of beef is far from consumers' expectations, and no strong relationship is observed between eating quality and price. Our aim is to create a reliable and consumer-driven prediction model of beef eating quality for Europe, based on the principles of the Meat Standards Australia (MSA) grading scheme, which needs some adaptations to suit the European beef chain. Beef carcasses are currently traded based on the compulsory EUROP grid, which uses visual and/or instrumental assessments to give scores for both muscling and fatness. We found that there was no substantial relationship between the EUROP system and eating quality (Bonny et al., 2016a). Additionally, carcasses from entire males and from dairy breeds are important in the European beef industry. These carcass types are under-represented in the MSA model. We found that a separate adjustment for entire males and dairy breeds is required to accurately predict eating quality for these groups (Bonny et al., 2016b). As an animal matures, beef quality decreases. In Australia, this is estimated through an assessment of bone maturity called ‘ossification’ whereas the European beef industry has accurate age records available to it. Ossification score is more appropriate for young animals but as animals get older, animal age becomes more appropriate in an eating quality prediction model (Bonny et al., 2016c). Thus, both measures are required to optimise accuracy. Finally, we observed that there were no major demographic effects on consumer evaluation of eating quality and willingness to pay (Bonny et al., 2017). In conclusion, a beef eating quality grading system, similar in design to the Australian MSA system, is highly applicable to both the European beef industry and the European consumers, despite the need for some adjustments. Further work is needed to determine the optimum statistical model for such a system.

Speaker
Biography:

Mireille Serhan (Engineer, MSc., Ph.D.) received her Ph.D. in Food Engineering and Biotechnology from National Polytechnic Institute of Lorraine, France. She has joined the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand in 2009. She is currently the Chairperson of the Nutritional Sciences Program and the Assistant Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences for Main Campus Programs. Her research interests revolve around the area of preservation of indigenous dairy products, as well as new food products’ development.

Abstract:

Qishta is a Middle Eastern hand-made heat coagulated cream product, prepared using full fat powdered milk that is heated and skimmed. This study aimed to assess the effects of replacement of milk fat with vegetable fat on the quality and sensory attributes. Qishta was made by the procedure adopted in the oriental sweets industries in Lebanon (Control). Full fat milk is replaced by a blend of skimmed milk and vegetable fat in powdered form. Compositional parameters, profiles of the fatty acids (FAs) and main microbial groups were analyzed using standard methods. Results have shown that this simple replacement could provide consumers with a wider variety of healthy items, especially for those who suffer from high blood cholesterol, cardiovascular diseases or overweight.

Speaker
Biography:

IncI CInar was born in Ankara and received her BSc in Food Science and Technology from Ankara University. After awarded a scholarship from Turkish Government to pursue graduate studies, she was graduated from Clemson University (MSc) and The University of Georgia (PhD) on the subjects of food engineering. As a faculty of Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, she is responsible from supervision of courses and projects on the areas of unit operations, heat and mass transfer, fruit and vegetable processing.

 

Abstract:

Preservation of foods is still one of the main targets of food processing industry. Hot air drying is a process where heat from drying air is transferred into a food being dried by the mechanism of simultaneous heat and mass transfer. Hot air drying is one of the most commonly used preservation techniques and, being a thermal process in nature, requires high energy consumption which in turn affects the food components. Bioactive compounds, by definition, are secondary plant metabolites having pharmacological and toxicological effects. Bioactive compounds, having extra-nutritional properties, exist in limited quantities in most fruits and vegetables and play essential roles in disease prevention and anti-aging. Recent studies are on the direction of determining role of bioactive compounds in health promoting processes and degenerative diseases. The aim of the study is to give detailed information on bioactive compounds in fruit and vegetables, health benefits, the effects of hot air drying on bioactive compounds and recent studies along with future trends in the subject area.

Speaker
Biography:

Fronthea Swastawati, was born in Kebumen, Central Java, Indonesia in February 23rd, 1959. She is working as a Lecturer in the Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences at Diponegoro University. Bachelor Degree on Fisheries was given by The Faculty of Fisheries, Diponegoro University in 1983, meanwhile, The Master of Science was given by the University of Humberside, UK, on Food Science and Technology. The Doctoral Title was achieved at Diponegoro University on 2008. Before career as a lecture at Diponegoro University, she works as a staf of Director of The Jakarta Fishing Port in 1983-1985 then moved to Jepara in 1985-1999 to become a staf of Coastal zone Ecodevolopment Laboratory, Diponegoro University. During 2004-2008, she occupies as a secretary of Fisheries Department, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Science. In 2009 she was elected as the best lecturer of the Faculty and the 2nd runner up of best lecturer achievement award of Diponegoro University. In 2012 her paper has been selected as one of the most excellent papers at 3rd International Conference on Biotechnology and Food Science (ICBFS 2012) in Bangkok, Thailand. At the moment she is occupies as a Vice of University Secretary.

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different type and concentration of liquid smoke on the texture, sensory and proximate composition of milkfish nugget. All experiments were done in triplicate. Test parameters used in this study were the hardness, deformation, gel strength, protein content, moisture, fat, ash, carbohydrates, sensory and hedonic test. Parametric data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA). The addition of Liquid Smoke with different types and concentrations was significantly effect to the value of hardness, deformation, gel strength, protein, carbohydrates, sensory and hedonic value (P<0, 05), but no significant on the moisture, fat and ash content of milkfish nugget (P>0, 05). The best treatment was achieved at a concentration of 1% in filtration liquid smoke and 5% in re-distillation liquid smoke. Overall milkfish nugget with filtration and re-distillation liquid smoke could still be acceptable in terms of sensory and hedonic values.

Harsh Prakash Sharma

Technology for extraction of wood apple (Feronia limonia) juice

Title: Technology for extraction of wood apple (Feronia limonia) juice
Speaker
Biography:

Harsh Prakash Sharma is doing his in-service PhD in Food Processing Technology on “Technology for Production and Preservation of clarified juice from wood apple fruits”. Currently, Mr. Sharma is serving as an Assistant Professor in college of Food Processing Technology and Bio-energy, AAU, Anand, Gujarat, India and having more than six years’ experience of teaching and research as well as approx. 5 year’s experience of reputed food processing industries. He has published more than 15 research papers in various national and international journals. He is also a member of several scientific societies and editorial boards in various reputed journals.

Abstract:

The effect of steaming, enzymes and combined treatments as pretreatments as well as different juice extraction machines on juice yield and total soluble solids of wood apple (“Feronia Limonia”) juice was studied. Pretreatments i.e. steaming for 2, 4, 6 and 8 minutes and enzymatic treatment (pectinase and cellulase enzyme) at different concentration (10, 20 and 30 mg/100g), incubation time (2, 4 and 6 hrs) and incubation temperature i.e. 40oC and combined enzymatic treatments of pectinase and cellulase enzymes in different proportions (3:7, 5:5 and 7:3)  as well as combined optimized treatments (steaming and enzymatic treatments) followed by three juice extraction machines i.e. basket centrifuge, screw type juice extractor and fruit pulper at different rpm were studied and evaluated for juice recovery (%) and total soluble solid (TSS) content of juice from wood apple fruit pulp. Combined optimized pretreatment i.e. 6 min of steaming, combination of pectinase and cellulase (7:3), 30 mg/100g combined enzyme concentration, 6 hrs of incubation time at 40oC incubation temperature obtained maximum juice recovery (82.85 %) and TSS content (5.3oBx) of juice from wood apple pulp. The Screw type juice extractor obtained highest juice recovery (86.9 %) and TSS (5.6 °Bx) at 150 rpm followed by Basket centrifuge and fruit pulper. The data was statistically analysed by using completely randomized design (CRD).

Cristina A. Cortes

Cagayan State University-Aparri, Philippines

Title: Development of cabibi/freshwater clam (Batissa violacea) sauce
Speaker
Biography:

She has completed her PhD in Educational Management on year 2012 at the Cagayan State University-Aparri garnering an outstanding rating in her dissertation presentation. She is presently an Associate Professor IV at the Cagayan State University-Aparri particularly teaching major subjects at the College of Hospitality Industry Management. She had already received a patent in making the process of aramang-dragon fruit flavored ice cream which was her main inspiration in drafting this research venture.

Abstract:

The main objective of this study is to introduce a cabibi or freshwater clam (Batissa violacea) sauce as another option for any other type of condiments or sauce. It would provide a generally accepted condiment just like the oyster sauces of the world but makes use of a specie of a freshwater clam. The method on gathering data for the study started with the researcher’s presentation of coded samples of cabibi/freshwater clam sauce to 81 evaluators from differing age groups. The evaluators assessed the cabibi/freshwater clam sauce formulations as to four quality attributes: color, odor, taste and general acceptability. From this methodology, it was found that the highly and generally accepted cabibi/freshwater clam sauce has the ratio of 500 ml cabibi/freshwater clam broth: 125 ml sugar: 125 ml soy sauce. On the basis of the study results, the formulation of 500 ml cabibi/freshwater clam broth: 125 ml sugar: 125 ml soy sauce was liked very much by panelists and consumers. The cabibi or freshwater clam sauce was also tested to be nutrient-packed and safe to consume based from the nutritive value and microbial tests conducted. From this, businesspersons should initially manufacture cabibi/freshwater clam sauce having a ratio of 500 ml cabibi/freshwater clam puree: 125 ml sugar: 125 ml soy sauce with a ratio. Thus, the researcher highly recommends to businesspersons to initially make use of this cabibi/freshwater clam sauce ratio and the product should be introduced in the market as it is highly profitable.

Ozlem Turgay

Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Turkey

Title: Salep: The name of the plant, powder, hot beverage, food ingredient
Speaker
Biography:

Ozlem Turgay was born in Gaziantep/Turkey on 04.05.1969. She graduated Istanbul University, Veterinary Faculty in 1992. She is still working as Prof. Dr. at Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University. She is a mother of a son and a daughter.

Abstract:

Salep is the name of a plant, powder of that plant, hot beverage and also a food ingredient. It is obtained from the tubers of Anacamptis pyramidalis, Dactylorhiza romana, D. osmanica var. osmanica, Himantoglossum affine, Ophrys fusca, Oph. holosericea, Oph. mammosa, Orchis anatolica, O. coriophora, O. italica, O. mascula ssp. pinetorum, O. morio, O. palustris, O. simia, O. spitzelii, O. tridentata, and Serapias vomeracea ssp. orientalis. Orchids were cultivated and described by Chinese firstly. Confucius (551-479 BC) called the orchid the ‘King of Fragrant Plants’, The Greeks referred to testicles as orchids, and Theophrastus (372-286 BC) named the orchids from that word. In Europe it is used as anti-pyretic, anti-consumption and anti-diarrhoeal. The Ottomans extracted ‘Sahlep’ from the dried tubers. Than the Arabic word became corrupted in English to Salep. Today, Salep is largely collected in Asia Minor, Germany, Greece, Afghanistan and India. It is used in Turkey for making ice-cream and beverages. Because of insensible collection of some salep species are in process of extinction and such species were prohibited by the Turkish Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs in 2003. After the picking of the roots or tubers of orchids, they boiled in milk or ayran for inhibition the enzymatic activity and reduce the loss of water-soluble ingredients, then stringed, dried and ground. Salep is a good source of a stabilizer as glucomannan (17.7-54.6%) and also contains starch (5.44-38.7%).

Charuwan Rattanasakultham

Crop Processing Research and Development Group, Department of Agriculture, Thailand

Title: Osmotic dehydration technology of santol
Speaker
Biography:

Charuwan Rattanasakultham. Present Position: Scientist. Organization: Crop Processing Research and Development Group, Postharvest and Processing Research and Development  Office, Department of Agriculture, Chatuchak, Bangkok, Thailand, www.doa.go.th. Type Of Business: Agricultural Research. Recent Research: Flavoring production from herb and spice for health. Effects of package and storage conditions on dried longan flesh quality.

Abstract:

The study on osmotic dehydration technology of santol.  Blanching duration, sucrose concentration, soaking period in syrup and storage condition were performed.  The result showed that appropriate preparations of santol fruit were washing, cleaning, draining, peeling and soaking with 1% NaCl and 1% citric acid solution for 30 minutes.  Besides, santol flesh was cut into 2 pieces and pulled seed out.  Santol flesh then was sliced approximately 0.5 cm and put in to 0.5% CaCl2 and 0.5% citric acid solution for 30 minutes.  Pieces of santol flesh were rinsed with clean water, drained, blanched for 6 minutes and soaked in 60 OBrix sucrose solutions for 180 minutes (fruit and sucrose solution ratio was 1:2).  Subsequently, samples were immediately washed in warm water (50-60 °C), drained for a minute and putted them to hot air oven (50 °C) for 18 hours.  Afterward, osmotic dehydration santol product was kept at ambient temperature (25-30 °C) and cold temperature (4-8 °C) for 6 months.  It was found that moisture content, water activity and microorganism levels of osmotic dehydration santol product kept in both temperatures were in acceptable standard (Thai community product standard: 136-2550).

Siriporn Tengrang

Crop Processing Research and Development Group, Department of Agriculture, Thailand

Title: Ethylene absorber paper from durian husk for prolonging the storage life of fruit
Speaker
Biography:

Siriporn Tengrang. Present Position: Scientist. Organization: Crop Processing Research and Development Group, Postharvest and Processing Research and Development  Office, Department of Agriculture, Chatuchak, Bangkok, Thailand, www.doa.go.th. Type Of Business: Agricultural Research. Recent Research: Research and Development of Ethylene Absorber Paper from Agricultural Residues, Bioplastic from Agricultural Residue, Research and Development of bio-plate from Durian husk, Effects of bioplastic packaging on prolonging the storage life of rambutan and research and development of bio-packaging from cassava starch.

Abstract:

This study aimed to produce the Ethylene Absorber Paper (EAP) from durian husk, that active packaging type. Durian husk was selected because it had holocellulose, which could produce package and paper. The durian husk was extracted for cellulose or fiber using sodium hydroxide and then lignin removed with hydrogen peroxide. Bleached and unbleached fiber were transformed to be paper by sheet former. Paper from unbleached fiber performed best properties with moisture content 7.99%, tear strength 435 mN, tensile strength 1.09 kN/m and burst strength 289 kPa and met the requirements of Thai industrial standard:170-2550 (55 grammage of Kraft Paper) except tensile strength. Afterward, unbleached fiber was prepared to EAP, which added with 3 different type of activated carbon viz. powder, granular and rod as ethylene absorber materials. EAP with powder activated carbon (PAC) was selected to prolong mango which shown lowest weight loss (10.55%) at 10 days of storage time at room temperature. After that, the suitable content of PAC added in EAP at 0, 5, 15, 25 and 35% (w/w) compared with commercial ethylene scavenger were demonstrated. Effectively absorb ethylene gas of all of EAP more than 95% since the early hours of absorbing. The results EAP with 5% PAC shown greatest extend postharvest life of mango for 15 days at room temperature storage and mango had lowest weight loss (28.59%) significantly different with other content and commercial ethylene absorber. Almost properties of all EAP met the requirements of Thai industrial standard:170-2550 except tensile strength but could be improved by adding dry strength agent. The results indicated that EAP from durian husk with 5% PAC had potential for development.

 

Speaker
Biography:

 Dr. Khaled EL OMARI  is dedicated to improving the quality of water and food in Lebanon for more 15 years old. He has a PhD in Food Engineer in Microbiology and analytical Chemistry and has a MSc. in Food safety and Lab accreditations (ISO 17025), he is also a certified food safety expert for (WHO, EU and USAID projects). He is director at the  Chamber of Commerce, Industry & Agriculture Laboratories In Tripoli & North Lebanon. He support many businesses, NGOS and government to provide the highest quality of water & food .Dr .Khaled is a lecturer in the Lebanese University and researcher in the LMSE lab in the Doctorate School at Faculty of Health of Lebanese University.

Abstract:

 
 
Yogurt is an ancient food that has been a part of the human meal for thousands of years. However, it’s a living perishable product that will spoil or become unsafe to consume, if not kept refrigerated or not utilized within certain period. The main aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of an essential oil, extracted from a Micromeria Barbata (MB) plant, against spoilage microorganisms especially yeasts and molds in yogurt samples produced by fresh cow milk. We concentrated also on the prolongation of the shelf life and the evaluation of titratable acidity of yogurt by using two concentrations of this natural preservative (0.125 and 0.25 µL/100mL). The yogurt was prepared by heating the milk, cooling, adding the essential oil (EO) and incubating with starter culture. As a result of our work, EO used at 0.125 µL/100mL can be used in order to increase the shelf life of yogurt for up to 70 days for sealed samples and 21 days for opening samples. The study also revealed that titratable acidity values after 70 days storage have increased from 0.9% (day 1) to 1.35±1% (day 70). It was observed that essential oil used at 0.125 µL/100mL did not affect the growth of starter culture in yogurt samples but it showed the strongest antimicrobial (fungi, yeasts and molds) activity comparing with the control free oil samples. The use of essential oils is limited by their strong aroma, altering the taste of the food, therefore, to avoid this unwanted side effect, a sensorial analysis proved that yogurt containing 0.125 µL/100mL EO was organoleptically acceptable and it had a good body and texture that was similar to the untreated one. According to the results of this study, the chemical, microbiological and organoleptic properties of the yogurt stored at 5±1ºC were determined. It can be concluded that 0.125 µL/100mL of EO can be used in order to increase the shelf life of yogurt, with no growth of spoilage microorganisms.