Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 19th International Conference on Food Processing & Technology Paris, France.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Ozlem Tokusoglu

Celal Bayar University, Turkey

Keynote: Food shelf life stability innovations in food science and technology

Time : 09:30-10:00

Food Technology-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ozlem Tokusoglu photo
Biography:

Tokusoglu has completed her PhD at Ege University Engineering Faculty, Dept of Food Engineering at 2001. She is currently working as Associate Professor Dr  faculty member  in Celal Bayar University  Engineering Faculty Department of Food Engineering. Tokusoglu performed a visiting scholar at the Food Science and Nutrition Department /University of Florida, Gainesville-Florida-USA during 1999-2000 and  as visiting professor at the School of Food Science, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington,USA during  April-May 2010.  She has published many papers in peer reviewed journals and serving as an editorial board member of selected journals. Tokusoglu published the scientific edited two international book entitled Fruit and Cereal Bioactives: Chemistry, Sources and Applications  and entitled Improved Food Quality with Novel Food Processing by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis,USA Publisher, third book Food By-Product Based Functional Food Powders is in progress; Dr Tokusoglu also published two national books entitled Cacao and Chocolate Science and Technology and  Special Fruit Olive: Chemistry, Quality and Technology. She organized and/or  administered as Conference Chair  at many conferences and congress in various parts of USA and Europe.  

Abstract:

Food shelf life stability provides a unique approach to understanding this critical subject by examining physical, chemical, and biochemical factors affecting food quality. The food sector and regulatory agencies are performing innovative technologies to provide safe and stable foods for public health. Nonthermal Technologies including high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), pulse electrical fields (PEF) and ultrasound (US) successfully decontaminate, pasteurize, and potentially pursue commercial sterilization of selected foods while retaining fresh-like quality and excellent nutrient retention; and these technologies are preferred instead of classical preservation technologies; bioactives has been enhanced. The effectiveness of antioxidants, emulsifiers, stabilizers, the utilizing of spray-drying technology for food powders, the preferring of irradiation, packaging in controlled atmospheres (MAP) can be affected the food shelf-life quality based on the food types

Food Technology-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Giancarlo Cravotto photo
Biography:

Giancarlo Cravotto is full Professor of Organic Chemistry at the University of Turin (Italy) and since 2007 he is Director of the Department of Drug Science and Technology and he is the President of the European Society of Sonochemistry. His research activity is documented by more than 300 peer reviewed papers, several book chapters and patents. His group has been partner of several UE projects. Among them ARCADE (FP7), MAPSYN “Highly efficient syntheses using alternative energy forms” (FP7-NMP-2012), “ECOEXTRACTION” (Alcotra 2011) and US4GREENCHEM (Horizon 2020). His research activity is focused on enabling technologies for green chemical processes and extraction from lab scale to industrial applications.

Abstract:

Now a days the application of cyclodextrin-assisted molecular encapsulation in foods offers many advantages. Cyclodextrins, their derivatives and their cross-linked polymers can all improve the quality of food in storage, remove specific components and stabilize and increase the presence of components that are important for a healthy diet. The application of cyclodextrins and their complexes in packaging materials can help not only transport of previously non-transportable foods, but may also prevent, or at least decelerate, the spread of microbial infections. The number of publications, particularly analytical papers, on this matter is constantly increasing. Although the application of modern analytical methods and equipment allows for the quantitation of previously subjectively characterized parameters, bio-sensory methods are still important. The application of cyclodextrins in the nutraceutical industry has many advantages; however, some side effects connected with the inclusion complexation ability of these carbohydrates should lead scientists to study cases on an individual basis. Recent developments in the major fields of cyclodextrin related food research are herein summarized.

Food Technology-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mirjana Menkovska photo
Biography:

Dr. Mirjana Menkovska, Ph.D is full professor at Department of Food Technology and Biotechnology at the Institute of Animal Science, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, Macedonia. Her background is Food Technology. She graduated at the Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy in Skopje, took M.S. degree in Instrumental Analysis in Chemistry and Technology at the same University and Ph.D. degree in Food Technology at the University of Belgrade, Serbia. Dr. Menkovska was visiting scientist for cereal research at GMRC in Manhattan, Kansas, during the academic 1985/86, at Cereal Research Institute in Detmold, Germany in 1997, and at other known research centers in Europe. Dr. Menkovska has published more than hundred fifty papers in domestic and foreign scientific journals and participated at ninety scientific meetings in the country and abroad. Her bibliography data counts over 200 references. She has also translated scientific books (3) and reviewed scientific books (3) from English into Macedonian language.

Abstract:

In order the food spoilage process to be prevented, as well as protection against some serious diseases to be provided, of an invaluable importance is performing of inhibition of fat peroxidation (LPI). The production of various kinds of fermented food today is increasing in the food industry attracting growing interest of consumers around the globe due to their tendency to consume natural and healthy food, as is the fermented food.Milk fermentation was investigated using of the following species of cultures: symbiosis of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, and the monocultures Lactobacillus casei, L. acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidus. Titration acidity was measured by Soxlet’s extractor in 0SH. Inhibition of lipid peroxidation was determined by a method based on developing of a dyed system using thiobarbituric acid and iron ions.The values of LPI were increased at the end of the investigation with the all species of cultures applied, and ranged from 52,87%; 65,85%; 76,07% and 65,67%, respectively. The results obtained from the investigation `have pointed out that the maximum capacity of inhibition of lipid peroxidation possessed Lactobacillus acidophilus, the second was Bifidobacterium bifidus. Milk fermented with the culture Lactobacillus acidophilus also showed the maximum degree of titration acidity of 40,06 оSH. This has proved that Lactobacillus acidophilus possessed the most proteolytic ability among the all cultures used. This is of great importance for the production of yogurt where these two cultures are applying, and for the balance of the all systems in the human organism provided by the positive influence of the probiotics. 

  • Workshop
Speaker
Biography:

Osama Ibrahim is a highly-experienced Principal Research Scientist with particular expertise in the field of microbiology, molecular biology, food safety, and bio-processing for both pharmaceutical and food ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening /culture improvement; molecular biology and fermentation research for antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids and food flavors; Biochemistry for metabolic pathways and enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bioconversion, and Analytical Biochemistry. Dr. Ibrahim was external research liaison for Kraft Foods with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and microbial screening and holds three bio-processing patents. In January 2005, he accepted an early retirement offer from Kraft Foods and in the same year he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for new startup biotechnology and food companies.

Abstract:

Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen. It is a causative agent of a severe infection that primarily affects immunocompromised people, pregnant women and occasionally healthy people. Intrauterine infection of fetus resulted in dearth, or an actually ill infant with a septic disseminated from listeriosis. The association of listeriosis outbreaks with contaminated foods led to recognize that L. monocytogenes is a food borne pathogen and that the intestine is the primary route of entry into the body. The incidence of listeriosis appears to be on increase worldwide, with the number of cases rising, especially in Europe. The annual endemic disease rate varies from 2 to 16 cases per million populations. L. monocytogenes strains appear to be normal residents in the intestinal tract of human. This may partially explain why antibodies to Listeria spp. are common in healthy people.L. monocytogenes detection in food samples traditionally involved culture methods based on selective enrichment and plating followed by the characterization of Listeria spp. based on colony morphology, sugar fermentation and haemolytic properties. These detection methods are lengthy and are not suitable for foods with short shelf lives. As a result more rapid detection methods of L. monocytogenes were developed based on antibodies (ELISA) or molecular techniques (PCR or DNA hybridization). These rapid detection methods areallowed detectionresultswithin 48 h.The nature of this food borne pathogen, including detection methods, mechanism of infection, disease symptoms, disease treatments, food protection and food safetyprotocols will be highlighted in this presentation.

Speaker
Biography:

Farid Chemat is a full Professor of Chemistry at Avignon University (France), Director of GREEN Extraction Team (alternative extraction techniques and solvents), co-director of ORTESA LabCom research unit Naturex-UAPV, and scientific coordinator of “France Eco-Extraction” dealing with dissemination of research and education on green extraction technologies. His main research interests are focused on innovative and sustainable extraction techniques, protocols and solvents (especially microwave, ultrasound and bio-based solvents) for food, pharmaceutical, fine chemistry, biofuel, and cosmetic applications. His research activity is documented by more than 170 scientific peer-reviewed papers, 10 books and 10 patents.

Abstract:

This presentation will introduce a new and innovative area in the frontiers of chemistry, biology and processing: green extraction with special emphasis on natural products. Green extraction is a part of the sustainable development concept; its history, concept, principles and fundamentals will be described. We will pay special attention to the strategies and the tools available to make bio refinery greener. The representation will present the innovative research in this area these past five years in term of innovative techniques (microwave, ultrasound, pulse electric field...) and alternative solvents (ionic liquids, sub and supercritical fluid, agro solvents, water...) applied to this new area green extraction of natural products with special examples applied to bio refinery concept.A general definition of green chemistry is the invention, design and application of chemical products and processes to reduce or to eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances. In relation of green extraction of natural products, this definition can be modified as follows: “Green Extraction is based on the discovery and design of extraction processes which will reduce energy consumption, allows use of alternative solvents and renewable natural products, and ensure a safe and high quality extract/product”. The listing of the “six principles of Green Extraction of Natural Products” should be viewed for industry and scientists as a direction to establish an innovative and green label, charter and standard, and as a reflection to innovate not only in process but in all aspects of solid-liquid extraction. The principles have been identified and described not as rules but more as innovative examples to follow discovered by scientist and successfully applied by industry.

 

 

  • Oral Session 1
Speaker

Chair

Ozlem Tokusoglu

Celal Bayar University, Turkey

Speaker

Co-Chair

Giancarlo Cravotto

University of Turin, Italy

Speaker
Biography:

Jae-Hyung Mah has completed his BS, MS and PhD from Korea University, Republic of Korea and postdoctoral studies from University of Wisconsin-Madison and Washington State University, USA. He is a professor of Food and Biotechnology at Korea University (Sejong Campus), Republic of Korea. He has published about 50 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member and referee for several peer-reviewed journals in food science and technology. His researches focus on the analyses of hazardous chemicals and microorganisms in fermented foods and development of novel protective and preservative strategies such as application of genetically designed starter culture to food fermentation and inactivation kinetics of foodborne pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms exposed to chemical, physical and biological intervention treatments.

Abstract:

Fermentation is one of the oldest technologies in food processing and preservation in the world. A variety of fermented dairy products have been extensively developed in western countries, while a diversity of fermented vegetable (or soybean) products have been steadily developed in eastern countries. Asian fermented foods (excluding alcoholic beverages) can be classified into three groups: 1) fermented vegetables such as Korean kimchi, 2) fermented soybeans such as Korean Jang and Japanese Hishio, and 3) fermented fish such as Korean Jeotgal and Japanese Narezushi. Among them, fermented soybean foods have been largely used as significant protein sources in Asian countries at least for millennia and recently proven to exert various outstanding health benefits such as anticancer, antidiabetic, antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and fibrinolytic effects. Nowadays fermented soybean foods are popular and consumed frequently even in western countries. Meanwhile, it is well known that fermentation of protein-rich raw materials (e.g., meat, milk) commonly provides abundant amino acid precursors of biogenic amines, and consequently results in a significant accumulation of biogenic amines in the final products (e.g., sausage, cheese). Likewise, previously reported data indicate that bacterial communities of fermented soybean foods can steadily produce substantial amounts of biogenic amines during processing (i.e., fermentation), distribution and storage, which may occasionally lead to a risk of food intoxication associated with digesting biogenic amines. Thus, a clear understanding of the occurrence of biogenic amines in fermented soybean foods is necessary to monitor and control biogenic amine formation in the foods. Unfortunately, empirical data on determining the dominant producers (and related genes) of biogenic amines and controlling the formation (and related gene expression) of biogenic amines in fermented soybean foods are scarce in literature. In this presentation, therefore, conventional and molecular genetic approaches to studying occurrence and control of biogenic amines in fermented soybean foods are described.

Speaker
Biography:

Abdullah Sinan Colakoglu is Assistant Professor of Food Engineering at Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Turkey. He received his BSc degree in the Cukurova University, MSc degree in The Ohio State University, USA and PhD degree in Ankara University, Turkey. He has been active in the area of food science for over 15 years and worked primarily on food chemistry. His research mainly includes thermal and oxidative stability of lipids by thermal analyses and bread quality and staling by thermal and mechanical analyses. He completed 4 research projects supported by The Scientific and Technological Research Council and University research funds. His research team is currently working on characterization of whey butter obtained from different collection centers. He has produced 36 international and national publications cited over 80 times. He has served as the editor for International Journal of Food Science and Biotechnology, and the reviewer for The Journal of Food and Turkish Journal of Agriculture - Food Science and Technology.

Abstract:

Bread, usually defined as a spongy material formed partly or fully by amorphous biopolymers, is not physically stable since it holds different colloidal systems such as emulsion, foam and gel. In the last few decades, a wide range of additives has been used to achieve the stabilization of these systems which leads to improvements in dough handling, bread quality and shelf-life.The first part of presentation includes general background and relevant literature review on technological significance of wheat flour lipids and emulsifiers. It was well established that endogenous polar lipids, despite their low levels in wheat flour significantly improve the baking performance of wheat flour. Emulsifiers like SSL and DATEM have been used as dough conditioners and/or crumb softeners in breadmaking for their ability to bind to/modify gluten proteins, to form a lipid monolayer and/or single lamellar phase systems at the gas/liquid interface and to form complexes with gelatinized starch.Enzymes are regarded as clean label improvers since they are assumed to become denatured during baking and have no remaining activity in the final products. The use of lipases for substitution of emulsifiers in the bakery products is quite recent as compared to other enzymes. Lipases having broad substrate specificity have been proposed to improve dough and bread characteristics, and to play roles in the retardation of bread staling. The mechanisms underlying the technological effects of lipases are closely linked to the hydrolysis of one or more fatty acids from nonpolar and/or polar lipids to form the corresponding more polar mono- and diacyl-forms. Lipases, therefore, offer the opportunity to generate surface active compounds in situ, and possibly to substitute or reduce the use of emulsifiers. The remainder of this presentation summarizes the results of three research projects with the focus on exploring the lipase functionality in breadmaking: (1) Lipase improved the dough properties by leading to an increase in the dough stability, maximum resistance to extension, hardness and amylose-lipid formation, and a decrease in the softening degree and stickiness. (2) Lipase addition gave better specific volume, softness, elasticity, sensory attributes and image processing futures of breads. During storage, the extent of changes in unfrozen water content and recrystallization of amylopectin as well as in hardness and elasticity was markedly reduced. (3) Combination of lipase with CMC, guar gam or xylanase brought about further improvement in those bread quality and staling properties. These findings suggested that the impact of lipase on breadmaking is similar to or to a greater extent than that of DATEM or SSL.
 

Nicholas Low

University of Saskatchewan, Canada

Title: Juice to juice adulteration detection
Speaker
Biography:

Nicholas Low is a Professor of Food Chemistry at the University of Saskatchewan (Canada).  His research group has been working in the area of food adulteration detection for more than thirty years. His group pioneered the field of ‘oligosaccharide fingerprinting’ for the detection of debasing agents in fruit juices, honey, and both maple and agave syrups. These analytical methods are used by government regulatory agencies and industry throughout the world.  Current research areas include the development of internal tracing methods to monitor foods from farm to fork; phenolic profiling for food authenticity; and the encapsulation of bioactive compounds for targeted delivery in human and animal systems. 

Abstract:

Fruit juices are a common target for adulteration by unscrupulous producers. One common method of juice debasing is the undeclared addition of a juice of lesser value to a product (juice-to-juice adulteration). This is of particular concern between apple and pear juices due to similarities in their major carbohydrate profiles and sensory properties. This makes apple-to-pear and pear-to-apple adulteration difficult to detect. Phenolic profiling by high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-PDA) was used to identify phenolics, which were unique to apple or pear juice for use as authenticity markers. A database of 27 commercial apple juices representing six world production regions and 32 commercial pear juices representing five world production regions were used in this study. One marker was identified in apple juice and two (excluding arbutin) were identified in pear juice. The structural identity of these compounds was determined following chromatographic isolation by a combination of UV-visible spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

Speaker
Biography:

Ufuk Bagci was graduated from Department of Food Engineering, Hacettepe University (Ankara, Turkey) at 2000. He obtained her MSc (2006) and PhD (2012) degrees from the same department. He worked as a research assistant at Hacettepe University between 2003-2012. He worked as an Engineer at the Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Livestock, European Union and International Relations General Directorate between 2012-2014. During his term at the Ministry he worked as a Technical Expert in a FAO-Turkey project. He is now working as an assistant professor at Trakya University (Edirne, Turkey), Department of Food Engineering since September 2014. His main interests are in Food Pathogens, Lactic Acid Bacteria, Probiotics and Food Security. He is also interested in membrane separation and cold plasma technologies.

Abstract:

In this study, surface decontamination efficiency of atmospheric argon plasma (AAP) treatment was examined on Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 inoculated carrots. The susceptibility of minimally processed carrots to microbial deterioration limits their shelf life and marketability.  Increased consumer awareness on the demand for healthy foods prompted the food industry to develop alternative methods that ensures microbiological safety of minimally processed foods while preserving original quality characteristics. In this context, atmospheric plasma treatment represents a potential alternative to traditional methods for non-thermal decontamination of foods. E. coli ATCC 25922 culture were spray inoculated on peeled carrot surfaces. Inoculated carrots were treated with AAP for 10, 30 or 60 s at a working distance of 10, 20 or 30 mm, respectively. After the plasma treatment E. coli counts were determined via pour plate method. During the plasma treatment surface temperature of the carrots were measured by thermal camera. The effect of AAP on microscopic morphology were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).AAP surface decontamination efficiency significantly increased with lower working distance and longer treatment times. The highest reductions of E. coli counts on carrot surfaces were achieved at 60 s treatment time for all working distance parameters. The maximum reductions were recorded as 4.54, 1.84 and 1.56 cfu/ sample, for 10, 20 and 30 mm working distances, respectively. The most effective parameter in decontamination of carrot surfaces was found 10 mm working distance and 60 s working time. During the AAP treatment surface temperature of carrots didn’t exceed 40 ºC. SEM results showed that bacterial cell wall integrity were disrupted after the plasma treatment causing cell death. This study demonstrated that the AAP treatment can be used as an efficient alternative process to traditional non-thermal decontamination methods for surface decontamination of carrots.

Speaker
Biography:

Aline Holder has her expertise in material science and engineering, food science and technology as well as food contact materials. Her research focus is based on advanced technologies for the food and beverage industry with special focus on smart surfaces to develop innovative automation products. She has built up her expertise during a phd thesis from 2010-2014 in research, evaluation, teaching and administration at the University of Hohenheim, Institute of Food Science and Biotechnology. Since 2015 she is part of the research department of Festo AG & Co. KG focusing on applied research to transfer new promising technologies to the company.

Abstract:

Surfaces and their properties are playing an increasingly important role in industry application.  In general, materials are used according to their property requirements such as elasticity, strength, heat resistance or to meet other requirements such as corrosion resistance. However, traditional surfaces are often not able to meet the ever increasing demands of today´s applications in automotive, textile, medical and food industry. Thus, in recent years, advances have been made using functional coatings to exceed limitations of material to make surfaces more attractive for specific industry applications. Hygienic and efficient automation technologies are key aspects for a successful production process for example in the food and beverage industry. Requirements regarding the cleanability and durability of surfaces that are in food contact are important factors. The approach of this study was to design functional surfaces with easy to clean and/ or self-cleaning coatings that enable automation components to be easily or less cleaned. For coating procedure physical vapor deposition was carried out in order to facilitate separation of the vaporized coating material to the substrate. Substrates used are aluminum, stainless steel and plastics for example polyamide or polyethylene. Analytical descriptions of surface characteristics were performed using scanning electron microscopy, contact angel and roughness.Different surfaces were successfully coated with easy to clean coatings and characterized analytically. In addition, coating of automation components consisting of different materials were realized and coating adhesion was improved. First application tests showed a clear improvement of material properties relating to chemical resistance and cleanability compared to today’s standard materials used. 

Speaker
Biography:

Nelly Datukishvili obtained the doctoral degree in 1997 from the I.Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University (Georgia). She worked in the area of molecular biology and biotechnology at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Biological Physics (Tbilisi), Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology (Moscow), Agricultural Biotechnology Center (Godollo, Hungary), Gent Agricultural Research Centre (IVLO, Belgium). Since 2004 Dr. Datukishvili has initiated molecular study and analysis of genetically modified plants and foods in Georgia. Currently, she leads the GMO group, is an Associate Professor and a manager of scientific projects. She has more than 40 publications and presentations. 
 

Abstract:

In recent years Global distribution of genetically modified (GM) crops resulted in an increasing share of GM foods in agro-food industry. Detection of genetically modified foods is important in many aspects of food quality and safety, labeling regulation, health protection, consumer information and food production. This study presents new multiplex PCR methods for rapid and reliable screening of GM ingredients in foods. The multiplex approach enabling simultaneous detection of several targets was applied to meet challenges for effective detection of increasing number of GM crops. Soybean, maize, potato and tomato were investigated as significant GM food crops. The certified reference materials of Roundup Ready soybean (RRS), potato EH92-527-1, maize MON 810 and Bt-176 were used for the optimization of multiplex PCR systems. The seeds and different foodstuffs were analyzed. The analytical procedure includes several steps, such as design of GMO-specific and species-specific PCR primers; genomic DNA extraction; evaluation of DNA quantity and integrity by spectrophotometer and agarose gel electrophoresis; development and optimization of all standard and real-time uniplex and multiplex PCR systems; analysis of GM ingredients in foods by multiplex PCR. The results analysis and interpretation exhibited that new multiplex PCR methods allowed identification of common transgenic sequences, such as: cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase (NOS) terminator, 5-enolppyruvylshikimate-phosphate synthase (epsps) gene, Cry1Ab delta-endotoxin (cry1Ab) gene, the junction between the nopaline synthase promoter and the neomycin phosphotransferase II gene (Pnos-nptII), phosphinothricin N-acetyltransferase (bar) gene as well as species specific genes, in particular soybean lectin,  tomato LAT52, maize zein and invertase, potato sucrose synthase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase genes. Testing of different foodstuffs demonstrated that new PCR methods developed in this study are useful for fast and reliable analysis of GM ingredients in foods.  

Speaker
Biography:

Ivana Radojcic Redovnikovic is a Full Professor at the Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology at University of Zagreb since 2017. She received her diploma in Biotechnology (2001) and her doctoral degree in Biotechnology and Bioprocess engineering (2007) at the same Faculty. The focus of her doctoral dissertation was localization of aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis and their potential role in plant defense. Her scientific interests are: plant secondary metabolites, phytoremediation and green solvents (ionic liquids, deep eutectic solvents). She is a lecturer for „Bioprocess Engineering“ and „Molecular Biotechnology“ Master degree studies programme and „Biotechnology and Bioprocess Engineering“ PhD programme, researcher in several national/international research projects, supervisor of undergraduate, graduate and PhD students. Currently, she is involved in projects concerning green solvents preparation and characterization (determination of their physicochemical properties and toxicological profile) and its application in extraction of phenolic compounds from food industry waste and biocatalysts with enzymes and microbes.
 

Abstract:

According to the principles of green chemistry, the selection of a suitable solvent is based on workers' safety (toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, absorption through the skin and respiratory system), process safety (flammability, explosiveness, volatility, creating the potential peroxide), environment protection (ecotoxicity, persistence, groundwater contamination, destruction of the ozone layer) and the sustainability of the process (the ability of recycling and repeated use possibility) meaning that green solvent should be chemically and physically stable, low volatility, easy to use and easy to recycle with the possibility of reuse. Over the last few years, natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) have been dramatically expanding in popularity as promising alternatives to traditional organic solvents. NADES may be considered as ‘designer solvents’ due to their numerous structural variations and possibility to design their physicochemical properties. Furthermore, NADES are based on compounds that are safe for human consumption which opens numerous possibilities for their applications in the field of life sciences. One of the applications of NADES is the extraction of biologically active compounds from plant material. A few studies in which NADES have been applied for the extraction of bioactive compounds, showed that many compounds are dissolved better than in water or lipids. Independently of target compounds, in order to design efficient extraction methods by using NADES, following steps should be included: (1) selection and fine-tuned NADES physicochemical characteristic, (2) selection and optimization of extraction method and, (3) recovery of target compounds from NADES if it is necessary. Herein, a brief overview of the up to date knowledge regarding these solvents, with special emphasis on extraction of phenolic compounds from grape pomace, will be presented.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Turkan Mutlu Keceli is Assistant Professor of Food Engineering at The University of Cukurova, Adana, Turkey.  She received her B.S. and the M.S degree in the University of Cukurova and Ph.D. in food science from the University of Reading, England.  She has been active in the area of food science for over 15 years.  Her research mainly includes olives and olive oil quality; natural extracts; lipid oxidation and oxidative stability; production and purification of value-added bio product phenolic compounds such as antimicrobials and antioxidants; characterization of olive oils from different regions. Her research is supported by the grants from DPT and University research funds. She is currently directing the projects on characterization of virgin olive oils obtained from Gemlik, Sarı Ulak, Halhalı, Sarı Haşebi olive varieties. She has produced over 77 international and national publications, has been cited 90 times and worked in 26 projects. She has 18 review service activities in journals of food science and technology.

Abstract:

Adulteration of food products involves the replacement of high cost ingredients with lower grade and cheaper substitutes. The extra virgin olive oil adulteration with other lower value vegetable oils still remains an important issue for the consumers and the olive oil sector. Adulteration of olive oil is also serious problem for regulatory agencies, oil suppliers and could also threat health of consumers. Blend edible oils can be prepared only for suitable oils, if the resulting blend deviates from the mixture proportions this should be given on the label. The edible oils widely employed in virgin olive oil adulteration can be lower quality olive oil (refined or pomace olive oil) or other seed oils such as corn, peanut, cottonseed, sunflower, soybean and poppy seed oils. Hazelnut oil is another oil with very similar triacylglycerol, total sterol and fatty acid compositions to extra virgin olive oil and has concerned numerous researchers. Several chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques in combination with chemometric methods have been proposed as rapid screening techniques for the authentication of extra virgin olive oil, and the detection and quantification of its adulteration with refined oils. Recently, simple, inexpensive, rapid and accurate alternative methods to determine adulterants in extra virgin olive oil in environments that time and fast decisions are important (ports, control points, market surveys and other rapid testing environments) have been developed including near infrared and Raman techniques combined with chemometric methods. This presentation will discuss recent researches which have been performed or in progress best in detecting and quantifying adulteration of extra virgin olive oil.

Speaker
Biography:

I have worked on characterization and utilization of spirulina for food applications during my doctoral degree at University of Agriculture of Faisalabad, Pakistan and Cornell University, New York, USA. My current research interest is on fortification of food especially prepared from staple crops like wheat and rice. I am also working on value addition of agricultural commodities.

Abstract:

Spirulina (Spirulina platensis) belongs to “algae” and considered as the most nutrient dense food on the earth as it is an excellent source of protein (62%), thiamine (2.38 mg/100g), zinc (4.15 mg/100g) and iron (28.50 mg/100g) at the same time very low in calorific value (290 kcal/100). Due to its exceptional nutritional profile, it has proven to be a great option to fortify staples to make nutrient rich products to alleviate malnutrition without disturbing dietary habits. This study was designed to conduct protein quality and safety evaluation of the spirulina using Sprague Dawley rats using 45-day trial and further utilized for the development of food bars for school nutrition programs. Biological indices including growth i.e. protein efficiency ratio (1.87), net protein ratio (4.16) and relative net protein ratio (78.48) as well as nitrogen balance study that include true digestibility (74.32 %), biological value (79.78%) and net protein utilization (60.24%) of spirulina proved it as a promising nutritional ingredient. Safety evaluation revealed no abnormal values related to test diets were observed in serum total protein, albumin, globulins and A/G ratio, glucose and insulin, lipid profile including cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL and HDL, liver enzymes (ALT, AST & ALP) and serum urea, creatinine and bilirubin as kidney function. Extruded crisps were prepared which was converted into food bars as a convenient nutrient delivery systems for the school nutrition program. Consumption of 100 g of the nutrition bar can satisfy substantial RDA of protein (90-95%), vitamin A (85-92%), vitamin C (93-100%), iron (200%), and zinc (110%). Spirulina supplemented nutrition bars is an economic and shelf stable vehicle for providing macro and micro nutrients to the school age children.

Speaker
Biography:

Baran Onal-Ulusoy is working as an Associate Prof.Dr. BARN ONAL-ULUSOY at Çankırı Karatekin Univ. in Turkey. She received her BSc., MSc and Ph.D.  degrees in Food Enginnering from Hacettepe University. Her research interests include Plasma polymerization technique for surface modification, Plasma sterilization and detoxification, Adsorption and other separation techniques (Membranes, MIP, TLC, Chromatography), Validation and accreditation of Food Analysis Methods, Chromatographic Instrumental Analysis Techniques and Food Chemistry. She is the author of 14 papers and one international book chapter and she worked at 11 projects in which 5 of them were international projects (COST, Koranet, IOWA State Univ. Inc.).She has one US patent on antioxidants used for frying oil.  

Abstract:

In this study, decontamination and detoxification effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure and low-pressure plasma systems were investigated on hazelnuts artificially contaminated with 7.9±0.06 log (cfu/mL) of Aspergillus parasiticus (A.parasiticus) and 7.8±0.06 log (cfu/mL) of Aspergillus flavus (A.flavus) spores. Different plasma parameters for atmospheric plasma (plasma frequency: 16-20-25 kHz, reference voltage: 40-100, plasma jet velocity: 50-100 m/min, gas flow rate: 3000-5000 L/h, raster offset: 3-5 mm, cycle time: 5, temperature, gases: high purity air or nitrogen) and low-pressure plasma (treatment time, gases: high purity oxygen, air or nitrogen) were tested for decontamination purposes. optimum parameters for both plasma systems were determined according to remained viable spores counted after plasma treatments. Additionally, the effects of optimum plasma conditions on different concentration of aflatoxin B1(1-1000 ppb) and total aflatoxins (B1+B2, 1-1000.39 ppb) were also determined and compared with the effect of gamma radiation (10 kGY Cobalt-60 for 10 min). Improved spore inactivation of 5.6 and 4.7 log (cfu/mL) in A.paraciticus and A.flavus,respectively,were achieved after 100 W-30 min of low pressure plasma treatment by using air as the plasma forming gas. Similarly, 5.5 and 5.4 log (cfu/mL) in A.paraciticus and A.flavus, respectively, were achieved after atmospheric pressure air plasma at 100 voltage, 25 kHz frequency, 3000 L/h flow rate, 60 m/min plasma jet velocity, 3 mm raster off- set and 5 cycle time. 89-90% of AFB1 reduction was achieved when 10-50 ppm of pure AFB1 was treated with low-pressure air plasma at optimum conditions.  On the other hand, highest AFB1 reduction of 75 % was achieved when 50 ppb of AFB1 was treated atmospheric pressure air plasma at optimum conditions.

 

Abdullah S Colakoglu

Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Turkey

Title: SPME/GC-MS characterization of volatiles in whey butter
Speaker
Biography:

Abdullah Sinan Colakoglu is Assistant Professor of Food Engineering at Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Turkey. He received his BSc degree in the Cukurova University, MSc degree in The Ohio State University, USA and PhD degree in Ankara University, Turkey. He has been active in the area of food science for over 15 years and worked primarily on food chemistry. His research mainly includes thermal and oxidative stability of lipids by thermal analyses and bread quality and staling by thermal and mechanical analyses. He completed 4 research projects supported by The Scientific and Technological Research Council and University research funds. His research team is currently working on characterization of whey butter obtained from different collection centers. He has produced 36 international and national publications cited over 80 times. He has served as the editor for International Journal of Food Science and Biotechnology, and the reviewer for The Journal of Food and Turkish Journal of Agriculture - Food Science and Technology.

Abstract:

Since annual world cheese-whey production is increasing, whey utilization has been the subject of much research. Whey, depending on the milk source, type and processing method of cheese, contains 0.3-0.5% of fat.This study was assessed to determine the volatile profile of whey butter, and to verify if the volatile fraction, determinant for butter flavor, differs among the collection centers and from milk butter. Whey butter was produced from wheys collected from four different cities around Turkey. Briefly, after clarification and pasteurization, whey was concentrated to cream with 45-50% fat content by cream separator. The cream was allow to crystalize at cool temperature and then churned. Finally, the obtained butter worked to improve its consistency, and kept -20oC. A duplicate 3.0-g portion of the butter sample and 10 µL of 2-methyl-3-heptanone in methanol as an internal standard in a 15-mL vial were hermetically sealed with Teflon coated rubber septa and aluminum caps and allowed to equilibrate at 40oC for 30 min. Extraction is achieved by inserting a 75 µm carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) fiber into the vial and exposing it to the headspace for 30 min at 40oC. Desorption of the extracted volatiles was carried out on a  gas chromatography–mass spectrometry system and run in split (ratio was 1:20) mode. During desorption, the fiber remained in the injector for 2 min at a temperature of 250oC, with helium as the carrier gas at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The volatile compounds were separated on a DB-Wax column (60 m x 0.25 mm x 0.25 µm). The oven was held at 40oC for 2 min, then increased for 5oC/min to 240oC and held for 6 min at 240oC. The mass spectrometer was set to record at 33–450 atomic mass units (threshold 1000) at a sampling rate of 1.11 scans/s. The volatile compounds were identified by calculation of the retention index (RI) of each compound, using an n-alkane series (C10–C26) under the same conditions. Identifications were confirmed by comparing retention times with reference standards when available. The amount of the volatile compounds was calculated by the comparison of the peak area of the internal standard and the unknown compounds. Each compound was expressed as µg/100 g of butter. Two commercially produced milk butters were used as control samples. The results obtained from the study will be presented and discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Hermin Pancasakti Kusumaningrum, SSi., MSi has completed her PhD at the age of 37 years from Gadjah Mada University by SEAMEO SEARCA program. She is the Associate Professor of Biology Department. She has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals in Indonesia and overseas.

Abstract:

Recent decades showing remarkable development of the biotechnology of microalgae. Valuable product for food, nutrition and other applications will extend into broader area. Natural nutrition productions from micro-algae are not yet competitive with their synthetic levels. Chlorella is widely used as a health food and feed supplement, as well as in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. Protoplast fusion was found to be an efficient method in improving its nutrition production and diversification in Chlorella vulgaris. The research was carried out by application of protoplast fusion on interspecific microalgae of C. vulgaris. The fusant was subjected for analysis of nutrition content by GCMS methods on C. vulgaris powder from 100 L liquid cultivation of fusant. The research result gained fusant in high mass production level. Nutrition analysis of fusants showed 17 amino acid with high concentration glutamic acid ( 14495,52 ppm) followed by leucine (10856.97 ppm) and Aspartic acid (10378 ppm). Palmitic acid (1,59%) was showed highest concentration in its lipid acid profile. Lipid analysis also showed polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with concentration 1.0987% and DHA 0,2% . Surprisingly, the fusant also revealed Omega 9 instead of Omega 3 and Omega 6. The research result showed potential acquisition of improvement nutrition by protoplast fusian application on microalgae.

Speaker
Biography:

Mannan Hajimahmoodi received Pharmacy Doctorate and PhD of Food Science and Nutrition from Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). She is Vice Chancelor of Food and Drug uniiversity of Medical Science, since 2013. Now she is Professor of Drug and Food Control Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, TUMS. She published many papers and managed more than 20 projects about food and nutrition.  She is Skillful in analytical instruments such as HPLC, GC/FID, IR, UV, and highly interested in analytical methods about food safety and quality.

Abstract:

Juice is an important source of vitamins required for human. The main goal of the present study was to develop an analytical method for the quality control of juice products. Two physiochemical characteristics of juice (pH and Brix) were analyzed and compared to the related standards. Additionally, the ferric reducing antioxidant power was applied for evaluation of antioxidants and Catechin, Eriocitrin, Narengin, Hesperidin and Quercetin contents were evaluated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and UV detection at 280 nm. The RP-HPLC method was performed using a C8 column with gradient elution of water, acetic acid and acetonitrile. Maximum LOD is 1.39 ppm for Eriocitrin and spiked sample’s recoveries of at least 82.81% were observed for Narengin. The method was applied for determination of pH, brix, total polyphenol content and flavonoids in 73 Iranian commercial juices, such as orange, pineapple, peach and sour cherry juice. Results indicated that the determination of flavonoids were highly valuable for quality control of commercial fruit juice.