Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 15th International Conference on Food Processing & Technology Rome, Italy.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Mirjana Menkovska

Ss. Cyril and Methodius University
Macedonia

Keynote: Food contamination by mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus species in regard to human and animal health effects

Time : 09:30-10:00

OMICS International Food Technology-2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mirjana Menkovska  photo
Biography:

She is full professor at Department of Food Technology and Biotechnology at the Institute of Animal Science, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, Macedonia. Her background is Food Technology. She graduated at the Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy in Skopje, took M.S. degree in Instrumental Analysis in Chemistry and Technology at the same University and Ph.D. degree in Food Technology at the University of Belgrade, Serbia. Dr. Menkovska was visiting scientist for cereal research at GMRC in Manhattan, Kansas, during the academic 1985/86, at Cereal Research Institute in Detmold, Germany in 1997, and at other known research centers in Europe. Dr. Menkovska has published more than hundred fifty papers in domestic and foreign scientific journals and participated at ninety scientific meetings in the country and abroad. Her bibliography data counts over 200 references. She has also translated scientific books (3) and reviewed scientific books (3) from English into Macedonian language.
Dr.Menkovska teaches Food Instrumental Analysis and Food Quality and Safety, as well as Dietoprevention and Dietotherapy at the post-graduate studies. She has been many years a member of AACC, RACI, ISEKI, National contact person at EUCheMS - Division of Food Chemistry, ICC National Delegate, and member of many Scientific and Organising Committees at many international and domestic scientific meetings and conferences, such as Food Technology Conferences. She got the aword ”The 13th of November” of her city Skopje for the scientific book “Technologycal quality of Macedonian wheat-recent instrumental techniques and methods, international standards” and a Certificate of Recognition for contribution to the Eu/ICC Cereal Conference 2002 “ECC 2002-ERA. She was rector candidate at Ss.Cyril and Methodius University and candidate for regular and corresponding member of Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts.

 

Abstract:

Aspergillus is one of the most important genera in the spoilage of foods and animal feeds, containing a number of highly mycotoxigenic molds. The aflatoxigenic and ochratoxigenic species are the most important for human health. Aspergillus mycotoxins of greatest significance in foods and feeds are aflatoxins (AFs). Aspergillus species, like Penicillium species, produce toxins that exhibit a wide range of toxicities, and aflatoxin B1 is perhaps the most potent liver carcinogen known for a wide range of animal species, including humans. Ochratoxin A and citrinin both affect kidney function. One of the most commonly occurring molds in nature is A.flavus. A.flavus like A.paraziticus has a strong affinity with nuts and oilseeds.Significant amounts of aflatoxins can occur in peanuts, corn and other nuts and oilseeds, particularly in some tropical countries where crops may be grown under marginal conditions and where post harvest facilities are limited. In addition to their prevalence in crops, foods, and feed stuff, AFs are frequently at high levels in air-borne, respirable grain dust particles, representing an occupational and environmental hazard. Detection, control and prevention for the toxins will be discussed in this presenrarion.

 

Keynote Forum

Osama O Ibrahim

Bio Innovation, USA

Keynote: Bacteriocins, a natural antimicrobial peptides for foods preservation and safety

Time : 10:00-10:30

OMICS International Food Technology-2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Osama O Ibrahim photo
Biography:

Osama O Ibrahim is a highly-experienced Principal Research Scientist with particular expertise in the field of Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Food Safety, and Bio-processing for both pharmaceutical and food ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening/culture improvement; molecular biology and fermentation research for antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids and food flavors; Biochemistry for metabolic pathways and enzyme kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bioconversion, and analytical biochemistry. He was external research liaison for Kraft Foods with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and microbial screening and holds three bio-processing patents. In January 2005, he accepted an early retirement offer from Kraft Foods and in the same year he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for new startup biotechnology and food companies.

Abstract:

Bacteria have mechanisms to allow them to compete for nutrients and space in their habitat. One of these mechanisms are the acquisition of defense system as the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), also known by the name bacteriocins. Bacteriocins are ribosomal synthesized peptides of less than 60 amino acids with a narrow to wide antimicrobial spectrum against gram positive bacteria. They are categorized in several ways, including producing strain, peptides structure, and mechanism of action. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are generally recognizes as safe (GRAS) and producing bacteriocins with a broad spectrum of inhibition against the growth of spoilage and or pathogenic bacteria. These bacteriocins offer potential applications in foods as natural preservatives that help reducing the addition of chemical preservatives or the intensity of heat treatments that affects food products quality and taste. Since food safety has become an increasingly important international concern, bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that target food-borne pathogens without toxic or other adverse effects have received great attention. In addition to the applications of bacteriocins in foods/feeds products, they have other applications in various industries such as pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics, products.

  • SYMPOSIUM On New developments in the extraction of plant bioactives/ nutraceuticals

Session Introduction

Giancarlo Cravotto

Universty of Turin, Italy

Title: Enabling technologies and green processes for the production of high-value bioactives

Time : 10:30-11:00

Speaker
Biography:

Giancarlo Cravotto is full Professor of Organic Chemistry at the University of Turin (Italy) and since 2007 he is Director of the Department of Drug Science and Technology and he is the President of the European Society of Sonochemistry. His research activity is documented by more than 300 peer reviewed papers, several book chapters and patents. His group has been partner of several UE projects. Among them ARCADE (FP7), MAPSYN “Highly efficient syntheses using alternative energy forms” (FP7-NMP-2012), “ECOEXTRACTION” (Alcotra 2011) and US4GREENCHEM (Horizon 2020). His research activity is focused on enabling technologies for green chemical processes and extraction from lab scale to industrial applications.

Abstract:

Extraction is one of the essential processes in the preparation of key ingredients in food and pharma industry. Choosing the best technology and procedure has a significant impact on the selectivity and product quality. The development of enabling technologies for process intensification is a prerequisite to advancing the biorefinery concept and green extraction. The overall goal is the cost-effective production of high-value ingredients and the recovery of co-products from biomass and food processing wastes which see ultrasound, hydrodynamic cavitation, microwaves and ball milling technology playing a pivotal role. Several naturally occurring compounds have progressively moved from the territory of traditional and folklore medicine to rigorous studies aimed at identifying natural preventive therapies for diseases. It should also be mentioned that phytochemical and antioxidant characteristics of some bioactive substances can also be affected by physico-chemical treatments, which may have either positive or negative impacts in their properties. Recent advances on a laboratory or bench-top scale, demonstrate the big advantages offered by cascade processes with enabling technologies generating reproducible results for scaling-up.

Break: Networking & Refreshments 11:00-11:15
Speaker
Biography:

Farooq Anwar obtained his PhD in Analytical Chemistry and has more than 15 years of research and teaching experience at different organizations including employments as Quality Control Executive, Scientific Officer and Post-doctoral Researcher at Canada and Malaysia. He is mainly involved in bio-analytical and phytochemicals research. He is parentally working as Associate Professor at University of Sargodha, Pakistan and is currently serving at the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia. He has the Honor of being selected as Fellow of the Chemical Society of Pakistan and Productive Scientist of Pakistan. On the basis of scientific achievements, The Academy of Sciences for the Developing World (TWAS) based in Trieste, Italy has granted him Young Affiliate Fellowship-2009. He has also been awarded Dr. Atta-Ur-Rehman Gold Medal/Prize-2010 (Chemistry) by Pakistan Academy of Sciences (PAS). He has supervised 10 PhD and 50 MPhil research students. Overall, he has published 200 research articles bearing cumulative Impact Factor of 300 and Citation over 5000 to his credit.

Abstract:

Moringa oleifera (M.oleifera), a well-known plant from the Moringaceae family, is very much popular among the rural communities due to its impressive range of nutritious and traditional medicinal benefits. Currently, there has been an increasing interest in exploring the functional food and nutraceutical potential of this multipurpose species due to its wide array of high-value nutrients and medicinally important bioactives such as essential amino acids and minerals, vitamins, high-oleic lipids, bio-peptides and polyphenolics along with a rare and rich combination of β–sitosterol, zeatin and antihypertensive compounds (thiocarbamate and isothiocyanate glycosides).A number of therapeutic and biological activities such as antipyretic, antiulcer, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic and diuretic have been attributed to different parts of this miracle tree. In view of the widespread nutritional, folk medicinal and therapeutic uses of M. oleifera, the present lecture is mainly designed to focus and highlight the growing potential of Moringa as a rich source of nutritional substances and valuable phytochemicals for the development of functional foods and nutraceuticals. An overview of various Moringa derived functional food and cosmo-nutraceutical products, available on shelves, as well as the current market trends and future prospects of Moringa industry are also discussed.

  • WORKSHOP

Session Introduction

Mirjana Menkovska

Ss. Cyril and Methodius University
Macedonia

Title: Mycotoxin contamination of cereals affecting technological quality of cereal-based products and health

Time : 11:45-12:30

Speaker
Biography:

She is full professor at Department of Food Technology and Biotechnology at the Institute of Animal Science, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, Macedonia. Her background is Food Technology. She graduated at the Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy in Skopje, took M.S. degree in Instrumental Analysis in Chemistry and Technology at the same University and Ph.D. degree in Food Technology at the University of Belgrade, Serbia. Dr. Menkovska was visiting scientist for cereal research at GMRC in Manhattan, Kansas, during the academic 1985/86, at Cereal Research Institute in Detmold, Germany in 1997, and at other known research centers in Europe. Dr. Menkovska has published more than hundred fifty papers in domestic and foreign scientific journals and participated at ninety scientific meetings in the country and abroad. Her bibliography data counts over 200 references. She has also translated scientific books (3) and reviewed scientific books (3) from English into Macedonian language. Dr.Menkovska teaches Food Instrumental Analysis and Food Quality and Safety, as well as Dietoprevention and Dietotherapy at the post-graduate studies. She has been many years a member of AACC, RACI, ISEKI, National contact person at EUCheMS - Division of Food Chemistry, ICC National Delegate, and member of many Scientific and Organising Committees at many international and domestic scientific meetings and conferences, such as Food Technology Conferences. She got the aword ”The 13th of November” of her city Skopje for the scientific book “Technologycal quality of Macedonian wheat-recent instrumental techniques and methods, international standards” and a Certificate of Recognition for contribution to the Eu/ICC Cereal Conference 2002 “ECC 2002-ERA. She was rector candidate at Ss.Cyril and Methodius University and candidate for regular and corresponding member of Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts.

 

Abstract:

Microbial contamination is the most common cause of food borne illnesses in humans and animals, but it also has an deleterious effect on the technological quality of food products.  Aspergillus is one of the most important genera of toxigenic molds in the spoilage of foods and animal feeds that produce a variety of aflatoxins. Many other mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus are of great significance from the point of view of human health in cancer induction and immunosuppresion. The most important group of mycotoxigenic molds other than Aspergillus species that contaminate the human food and animal feeds are species of the genus Fuzarium. Cereal grains, beans and oil seeds can be contaminated by these species among which the most commonly contaminated are wheat, corn, barley, rye, triticale, oats and millet. Fuzarium  toxins, particularly deoxynivalenol and fumonisins, have been detected in finished human food products, while zearalenone has been found naturally occurring in numerous cereal grains, especially in those for animal feed. In addition to their deleterious health effects, Fuzarium species worse the technological quality of the products made from cereal grains. Detection, control and prevention for both toxins will be discussed in this presentation.

 

  • ORAL SESSION (Food & Nutrition | Food Safety: Prevention & Control | Food Microbes: Probiotics & Functional Food | Food Industry: Edible Oils & Others | Food Marketing & Economics | Diary Food Technology)
Speaker

Chair

Mirjana Menkovska

Ss. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, Macedonia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Osama O Ibrahim

Bio Innovation, USA

Session Introduction

Anne Pihlanto

Natural Resources Institute
Finland

Title: Novel protein sources for food security

Time : 12:30-12:50

Speaker
Biography:

Anne Pihlanto has completed her PhD from University of Turku. She is managing the Innovative Food Chain research area at Luke.  She has over 20 years’ experience in food protein research. Publications with original results within food technology, chemistry and medical science have been presented in scientific international journals, monographies and invited book chapters. The articles are published in microbial, food and dairy science journals. Total amount of scientific papers is about 150.         
 

 

Abstract:

Novel protein source for food security (ScenoProt) is a project funded by Strategic research program (SRC) in Finland.  Our vision is that in 2030 the Finnish consumers will eat tasty, wholesome, sustainably produced and nutritionally sufficient doses of protein, optimized for each age cohort according to Finnish nutrition recommendations. The ScenoProt project will significantly increase the knowledge on health and safety aspects of underutilized plant and novel protein sources. We know how different processing methods affect beneficial and anti-nutritional components. Cost-effective and environmentally acceptable processes will be established and their suitability in different scale will be proved. We will show the role of plant proteins in structural formation of foods through processes such as fermentation, hydrolyzation and emulsification. Developed model products are safe, contain beneficial components, like fibers, vitamins, and have well balanced amino acid composition.  This project has great potential in the field of public health. It will add to the current knowledge on the possibly substantial positive health effects and the physiological mechanisms of high plant protein intake. The results may have several implications for future recommendations and nutrition policy, leading to guidelines for diets rich in plant derived protein. Consequently, the findings of this project can give remarkable help in tackling the burden of several chronic diseases, such as type-2 diabetes and colorectal cancer, and thus contribute to desired improvements in public health. 

Speaker
Biography:

She has completed her Bachelor of Technology (Food Technology) from Universiti Sains Malaysia in 1993 and obtained her PhD from Leeds University, UK in 1998.  Currently, she is an Associate Professor and Dean of School of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, Malaysia.  Her main research interest is on food protein.

 

Abstract:

This study reported the optimization of enzymatic protein hydrolysis condition of  mud crab meat to obtain maximum angiotnesin-converting inhibitory (ACEI) activity. Firstly, screening of commercial food grade enzymes (Alcalase®, Protamex™, Neutrase® and papain) were carried out with hydrolysis time of 1 to 4 hours to select the enzyme with the highest ACEI activity. Then, enzymatic hydrolysis was further optimized by using Response Surface Methodology with a face centered Central Composite Design (CCD).  Four variables including  temperature (45-65 ˚C), pH (pH 5.5-7.5), hydrolysis time (1-4 hours) and enzyme to substrate (E/S) ratio (1-3%) were employed. It was found  that mud crab hydrolysate produced from Protamex™ gave the highest ACEI activity compared to Alcalase®, Neutrase® and papain. Optimization study shows that 2FI model can be used to describe the effect of the four variables on the ACEI activity of mud crab. The optimum condition was at 65˚C, pH 5.5, 1 % E/S and 4 hours of hydrolysis time.  Validation of optimum condition shows that the experimental value of ACEI activity (88.93%) was close to that of predicted value (90.08%). The IC50 of ACEI activity of mudcrab hydrolysate prepared at this optimum condition was 2.64 ± 0.112 mg/ml. In conclusion, mud crab hydrolysate is an alternative source of ACEI peptides. Further study is on going to purify and characterize this bioactive peptide.

 

Break: Lunch Break 13:10-14:00
Speaker
Biography:

Roberto Romaniello is a Contract Researcher in Agricultural Mechanics, Contract Professor in Mathematics at University of Foggia, Department of the Science of Agricultural, Food and Environment. His scientific research concerns the innovation and optimization of agro-food industry equipment and plants, prototyping new food plant’s machines, designing of image analysis protocols for food safety and food quality assessment. He has been involved in research projects aimed to design and prototyping new industrial scale machines and new methods to control the food processes by using different measurement chains.

Abstract:

The performances’ process parameters of an innovative horizontal centrifugal decanter were mathematically modelized. The machine belongs to the decanter’s pâté generation and the experiments were conducted in a continuous industrial olive oil extraction plant. Two different configurations have been considered: with water added and without. Mathematical models were developed to predict the extraction efficiency and the oil content in the husk, wastewater and pâté, as a function of the olive paste’s mass flow rate. Various statistical parameters (mean percentage error, mean bias error, root mean square error, modeling efficiency and chi-square test) have been used to evaluate the mathematical models’ suitability. The models developed showed very good generalization capabilities. The decanter’s extraction efficiency resulted high. In particular, the extraction efficiency reached values higher than 90% when the decanter worked with water added. Moreover, in both conditions considered it was been obtained dry solids and olive oil clarified by light solids. The decanter was also demonstrated to be able to switch from one configuration to the other without stopping operation. 

Speaker
Biography:

She is an Associate Professor within the School of Food Science at the University of Idaho and Washington State University. Her research interests include food microbiology, dairy microbiology, food biotechnology, microbial food safety, food bio-preservation, bioactive packaging of foods, functional foods, and bioconversion of agricultural and industrial waste into value-added products. She is an alumna (2012-2013) of The Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program. She is an active member of the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) and served as the Chair for the Biotechnology Division of the IFT (2014-2015). She serves on the Editorial Board of Probiotics and Antimicrobial Proteins.

 

Abstract:

Six lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains, Lactococcus lactis BFE 920, L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454, L. lactis subsp. cremoris ATCC 14365, Lactobacillus curvatus L442, Lact. curvatus LTH 1174, and Lact. bavaricus MN, were grown in cheddar cheese whey supplemented with complex nutrient sources. Cell-free culture supernatants were freeze-dried and the resulting bacteriocin-containing powders were applied on the surface of hot dogs that were inoculated (~ 4 log cfu/hot dog) with a five-strain Listeria monocytogenes cocktail. Hot dogs were vacuum sealed and stored at 4°C for 4 weeks. L. monocytogenes was enumerated, using both Tryptic Soy Agar (TSA) and Oxford Listeria Agar (OXA), on day 0 and at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks of the refrigerated storage. In hot dogs containing only the L. monocytogenes inoculum, L. monocytogenes counts increased from 4 log cfu/hot dog up to 7 log cfu/hot dog. All samples containing freeze-dried bacteriocin-containing powders exhibited significantly lowered (P < 0.05) L. monocytogenes populations on the surface of hot dogs throughout the 4-week study except for bavaricin MN powder. Bacterial counts on hot dogs packed without any powder were statistically equal on day 0 when enumerated on OXA. Freeze-dried bacteriocin-containing powders from Lact. curvatus L442 and L. lactis subsp. cremoris ATCC 14365 decreased L. monocytogenes populations on the surface of hot dogs by greater than 2 log cfu/hot dog throughout the 4-week study. For the powdered bacteriocin preparations from L. lactis BFE 920, L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454, and Lact. curvatus LTH 1174, L. monocytogenes populations were determined to be approximately 3-log cfu/hot dog after 4

 

Speaker
Biography:

She has completed her Ph.D.  from Middle East Technical University, Ankara,Turkey. She is an associate professor at thedepartment of industrial engineering in Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey. She has beenworking on thesubject of optimization, mathematical modelling, statistical methods of engineering. 

 

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the aflatoxin production of aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus and expression levels of aflatoxin biosynthetic metabolic pathway genes (aflR, nor-1 andpksA) in red pepper stored under different water activities (aw) (0.80, 0.85, 0.90 and 0.95 aw) and temperature conditions (5, 15, 25 and 35°C). Cultural mould growth, aflatoxinanalysis, extraction of total RNA were carried out at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 15 and 20th days of incubation. Expression levels of theregulatory gene aflR and two structural genesnor-1 and pksA of the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway were also assayed by the reverse transcriptionreal-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Also, response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to evaluate the effects of aw, temperature, time, genes (aflR, nor-1andpksA) expression on aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) production of  A. Flavus and to predict AFB1 amounts of contaminated red pepper. According to the results, mouldcounts of samples at 0.80 and 0.85 awdecreasedstartingfromthethirdday of storageforalltestedtemperatures, and the lowest mould counts were obtained at 0.80 aw-25°C and 0.80 aw-35°C conditions on the 20th day of storage. AFB1contents of  the samples increased with the increment of temperature for all aw levels. The lowest AFB1 production was observed under 0.80 aw-5°C conditions in the experiment while the highest AFB1amount (61.56 ppb) was detected at 0.95 aw-35°C on 15th day, and these cond highest AFB1 amount was observed at 0.95 aw-25°C on 15th day (57.21 ppb) of storage. Interms of the model, the effects of aw, temperature and pksA gene expression were very significant (p<0.01), and the effect of nor-1 gene expression was significant (p<0.05), while the aflR gene expression was insignificant (p>0.05) in explaining of the AFB1 occurence in contaminated red pepper stored at 25°C. In conclusion, it can be suggested that the growth of aflatoxigenic A. flavus, amounts of AFB1, gene expression levels of aflR,nor-1andpksA depending on theaw, temperature and time were monitored in red peppers and AFB1 production was modelled with RSM for the first time in this study. Determination of correlations between AFB1 production and aw, temperature, time, aflR, nor-1and pksA expression levels could be help ful to predict potential risk AFB1 accumulation during storage of redpeppers.

 

Speaker
Biography:

She has completed his PhD in Technological Innovation for Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences at the University of Milan in 2010. Currently, she is a research fellow at the Institute of Sciences of Food Production, National Research Council of Italy, Milan. Her research activity concerns food microbiology and molecular biology, with particular regard to fermented products. She has published more than 20 papers in international and national journals.

Abstract:

New aerogels were obtained from laccase-oxidized galactomannans (GM) of the leguminous plants fenugreek, sesbania and guar and we suggest their potential practical use as delivery systems of actives.
 
Laccase/TEMPO oxidation of GM in aqueous solution causes a viscosity increase up to fifteen-fold and generates elastic hydrogels.
 
Upon lyophilization of these hydrogels, water-insoluble aerogels are obtained, capable of uptaking water or solvents several times their own initial weight.
 
To test these new materials as delivery systems, the anti-microbial peptide nisin and the enzyme lysozyme were used as models. They were absorbed in the aerogels from aqueous solutions, retained in active form after re-lyophilization of the “loaded” hydrogels, and released in solution as evaluated by biochemical and microbiological assays. The release of nisin from the three aerogels was evidenced by the growth inhibition of the Gram positive Enterococcus faecalis and Clostridium tyrobutyricum, while the activity of lysozyme was confirmed by the halo formation due to cell wall peptidoglycans hydrolysis of Micrococcus lysodeikticus and by the growth inhibition of Cl. tyrobutyricum.
 
These new biomaterials, composed of enzymatically oxidized plant polysaccharides, might represent versatile, biocompatible delivery systems of active principles in food and packaging materials.
 

Rosa Palmeri

University of Catania
Italy

Title: Preliminary study of employ of an olive leaf extract on bakery products

Time : 15:20-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

She has completed her PhD in "Food Science and Technology at University of Catania.  Actually she is a temporary researcher in the Food Science and Technology, at the Department of Agriculture Food and Environment at University of Catania. The scientific production is summarized in more than 40 pubblications, which concerns the development of economic methods of extraction and purification of glycosidases by related activities from vegetables and microorganims, in order to determine the best conditions for a possible use for the improvement of organoleptic and sensory characteristics of food; valorization of wastes from agro-food industries for application in nutraceutical food production. 

 

Abstract:

Olive leaves represent a quantitatively significant by-product of olive grove farming, around 10% of the total weight of olive arriving to the mill, they are considered as a cheap and natural source of bioactive compounds. The chemical composition of olive leaves varies according to many factors, the most important are olive cultivar, climatic conditions, stage of crop’s cycle, agronomic practices and extraction procedures, that influences the different cultivars’ total and specific phenols content as shown in the scientific literature. The olive leaves’s secoiridois, flavonoids and phenolic compounds are beneficial for humans health and in particular phenolic compounds such as oleuropein, verbascoside, rutin, tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol which biologic activity, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antiproliferative properties. Different studies show that many factors influence the olive leaf biocompound extraction efficiency, such as type and volume of solvent, temperature, pH and number of steps. An olive leaves aqueous extract from ‘Biancolilla’, a Sicilian cultivar rich in oleuropein, was employ for the production of bakery products.  The enriched products maintein after an high cooking temperatues an higher phenolic content and antioxidant activity, expressed as DPPH, than control. Furthermore, activity water (Aw) and textural properties at different time of storage were determined to evaluate the shelf-life of the product. Olive leaf extract represents a good candidate as functional ingredient for the enrichment of bakery products; it can be associated with improved prevention and control of metabolic diseases.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Alessandro Leone is an Associate Professor in Agricultural Mechanics and Food Processing Plants, SAFE Department - Engineering Area, University of Foggia, where he teaches “Mechanics and Mechanization in Agricultural”, “Food Engineering” and “Work Safety”. His major research topics includes, food processing plants: agro-food industry plants and process settings, processing logic control, recovery of agro food waste by-products to useful composts in agriculture, as well as waste management and agricultural mechanics: analysis of the vibrations transmission mode from the vibrating heads to the trunk of olive trees, and subsequent optimization; study, design of mobile elevating work platforms; safety devices on tractors and machinery.

Abstract:

A microwave system was developed and applied in an industrial-scale olive oil extraction plant to evaluate the impact of the microwave treatment used to condition the olive paste, to analyze the installation and determine any advantages to improving the process continuity. To this purpose the extraction efficiency of the olive oil plant was investigated for different operating conditions of the microwave system and compared with conventional methods to condition the olive paste. The microwave system was evaluated in terms of extraction yield of the olive, electrical and thermal energy consumption and olive oil quality. The energy consumption evaluation shows that the use of the microwave system requires an additional electric power but non request thermal power with respect to the traditional malaxers machine. The short process time obtained with the microwave treatment resulted in a low peroxide value compared with the conventional method. Using the microwave treatment, a higher concentration of volatile compounds with spicy and bitter notes was obtained. No significant differences were found with extraction yield. The experiments showed the potential of the continuous microwave system to conditioning the olive paste as an alternative technique to effectively condition olive paste.

Break: Networking & Refreshments 16:00-16:15

Marco Iammarino

Zooprofilattico Institute of Puglia and Basilicata of Foggia, Italy, Italy

Title: Foodstuffs radiocontamination by 90Sr: Analytical methods, mean levels in food and contribution to risk assessment

Time : 16:15-16:35

Speaker
Biography:

Marco Iammarino is a Food Technologist and Chemical Surveyor. He is a Researcher of Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e della Basilicata of Foggia (Italy), since 2002. He deals about food quality and safety, analytical chemistry applied to food analysis, research & development and analytical methods validation. In particular, he has developed several analytical methods (HPLC, HPIC, CE, LSC) for the determinations of food additives (nitrites, nitrates, sulphites, polyphosphates, organic acids, etc.), radionuclides, mycotoxins and drugs in foods and feed materials. He has published more than 100 articles in peer-reviewed and Academic Journals, Congresses Proceedings and books.

Abstract:

90Sr is considered an important contaminant relating to food supply chains, but comprehensive studies about this type of contamination in food are lacking. In this communication, two radiochemical methods, validated for the determination of radiostrontium in liquid and solid matrices, are described. Moreover, the related control activity, developed in the last 4 years by Italian National Reference Center for the Detection of Radioactivity in Feed and Foodstuff, is reported. More in depth, the described radiochemical methods are characterized by high sensitivity (Minimal Detectable Activity equal to 6 mBq L-1 and 8 mBq kg-1 for liquid and solid matrices, respectively), Linearity (as determination coefficient r2) = 0.999, Precision (as CV%) in the range 13% - 15%, Trueness (as recovery%) in the range 89% - 106% and ruggedness. Regarding control activity, 176 liquid and 260 solid foods, were analyzed. Milk samples resulted the most important indicator about 90Sr contamination, within liquid matrices (mean 90Sr activity concentration: 0.058 Bq L-1). Among other liquid foods, wine/spirits and water watering resulted the most contaminated, with mean contamination levels equal to 0.022 and 0.035 Bq L-1, respectively. Regarding solid matrices, cheeses produced from sheep’s milk resulted the most contaminated (mean level: 1.237 Bq kg-1). Meat products and seafood showed not significant contamination levels. Among vegetables, contamination levels detected in cacao/chocolate and spices resulted comparable with those measured in cheeses obtained from cow’s milk. A final interesting aspect was the not negligible mean contamination level detected in animal feeds (raw materials), equal to 1.557 Bq kg-1.

Speaker
Biography:

Rosaly V. Manaois received her Master’s degree in Food Science from Louisiana State University as a scholar of the Ford Foundation International Fellowship Program. She was a fellow at the Functional Food Factor Laboratory at the National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan in 2014-2015 under the United Nations University-Kirin Fellowship Programme. She is currently the Head of the Rice Chemistry and Food Science Division of PhilRice. Her research interests include functional foods, rice starch, sensory evaluation, and rice grain quality.
 

Abstract:

High intake of plant foods has been linked to decreased risk of many chronic diseases. In the Philippines, various vegetables are cultivated but have not been thoroughly studied in terms of their antioxidant capacities. This work assessed the antioxidant capacity of vegetables commonly grown and consumed in rice-based farms in the country. Twenty-one raw and boiled vegetables were evaluated for their total phenolic content (TPC) using the Folin-Ciocalteau assay. The antioxidant capacities were determined using the 2,2-diphenypicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity and 2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic-acid)-diammonium salt (ABTS) cation-radical scavenging activity techniques. The TPC of the raw vegetables ranged 0.11-31.78 mg gallic acid equivalents/g sample, with the highest values recorded in jute (Corchorus olitorius), eggplant (Solanum melongena), squash flower (Cucurbita maxima), chili (Capsicum frutescens), mustard (Brassica juncea), Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa) and green pepper (Capsicum annuum). DPPH of the raw samples ranged 1.24-239.32 µmol Trolox equivalents (TE)/g, while ABTS ranged 2.10-136.84 µmol TE/g. Boiling generally reduced the TPC and antioxidant capacities. Jute, eggplant, water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica), green pepper, and ginger (Zingiber officinale) consistently displayed the highest antioxidant capacities in both raw and boiled forms as measured by DPPH and ABTS techniques. The TPC of raw and cooked vegetables were highly correlated with their DPPH values (r=0.931** and 0.892**, respectively) and ABTS (r=0.941** and 0.828**, respectively). Increasing the consumption of minimally heated vegetables could help consumers maximize their dietary antioxidant intake.

Speaker
Biography:

She obtained her BSc in Life and Earth Sciences from Saint-Joseph University, Lebanon in 2007.  She earned her M.Sc. in Food chemistry with honors from Saint-Joseph University, Lebanon in 2009. Then worked as a Quality manager at Conserves Modernes Chtaura_Lebanon. In 2013, She obtained a certificate entitled “ISO 22000:2005” Food safety management System Lead Auditor from RABQSA. She was subsequently awarded a scholarship to pursue her PhD under a joint program between Saint-Joseph University and University of Technology of Compiègne_France. She obtained in 2013 a PhD in Food chemistry from Saint-Joseph University and a PhD in Industrial Process Engineering and Sustainable Development from University of Technology of Compiègne_France. After completing her PhD, she worked in 2014 as a Quality manager at Abido Spices_Neemeh_Lebanon. She has a number of publications in peer-reviewed journals. In 2014, She was appointed as an assistant professor at Nutrition & Dietetics department, Faculty of Health sciences, at Beirut Arab University

Abstract:

Food fraud is a serious ethical and economic problem affecting the food industry everywhere. As pomegranate molasses’ consumption continues to increase due to its unique taste and antioxidant activity, its adulteration is taking several forms. Most commercial pomegranate molasses are labelled as containing 100 % pomegranate, giving the customer the impression that they are benefitting from the healthful and nutritional effects associated with pomegranate. The purpose of this study was to detect for the first time the adulteration of commercial pomegranate molasses with date molasses, which will be important not only to the regulatory agencies and to manufacturers, but also to consumers who might purchase it for its health-beneficial effects. To differentiate pomegranate molasses from the date syrup, different parameters that could signal adulteration, such as total acidity content, polyphenol yield, anthocyanins concentration, color intensity and antiradical activity were determined. UV-VIS spectroscopy was used as a screening method to detect fraud and high-performance liquid chromatography was conducted for a quantitative analysis. Our findings support the hypothesis that some of the commercialized pomegranate molasses in the Middle East area are adulterated with cheaper date syrup.

Speaker
Biography:

Antonia Tamborrino is an Assistant Professor in Agricultural Mechanics and Food Processing Plants at University of Bari, Department of Agricultural and Environmental Science. Her scientific research deals with the innovation and optimization of agro-food industry equipment and plants, design of the food pilot plants and their implementation in the industrial environmental; sensors and real time process for the food industry; processes settings; influence of industrial processes on food quality. She has participated on different national and UE projects to develop innovative processes and prototypes of agro-industry plants.

Abstract:

In this scientific paper, an industrial prototype of a partial de-stoner machine was specified, built and implemented in an industrial olive oil extraction plant to evaluate its quantitative and qualitative performance compared to the traditional mechanical crusher. The extraction efficiency of the olive oil extraction plant, olive oil quality, sensory evaluation and rheological aspects were investigated. The research demonstrated that leaving 40% of pits in olive paste (as pits fragments) the extraction efficiency loss at decanter level is avoided. The extraction efficiency measured when partial destoner machine and mechanical crusher were used did not show statistical differences. The oils obtained using partial destoner machine are characterized by higher green fruitiness, flavor and aroma with respect to those produced using traditional processing systems. In addition, the partial destoner machine allows the pits recovery to be used as biomass. It is to be noted that nowadays the goal of environmental sustainability is oriented to the use of renewable energy instead of fossil fuels and the global goal is to increase the use of biomasses for energy-consuming processes.

Speaker
Biography:

Emilia Bustos-Griffin has worked over 30 years in research on food irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment. Her work has resulted in irradiation doses that have been globally adopted for fruit pests.  Her research on free radicals was important for the evaluation of quality in spices and dried food.   She has served as an expert in dosimetry standards with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as well as a member of the national expert committee for the Official Mexican Standard establishing doses for the irradiation of food in Mexico.  Emilia has been an expert in working groups for the North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO) and the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) for the elaboration of regional and international standards for the use of irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment.  She represented Mexico for more than 10 years in the International Consultative Group for Food Irradiation with the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Abstract:

An important factor for increasing the commercialization of phytosanitary irradiation (PI) is the adoption of generic doses in international and national regulatory frameworks.  A limiting factor to accelerating the use of PI is the availability of information on commodity tolerance for the wide range of horticultural products that might be eligible for treatment with generic doses.  The International Database on Insect Disinfestation and Sterilization (IDIDAS) was developed by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture to provide information on the doses of radiation applied for these purposes to mites and insect pests of crops and veterinary and human importance. It includes data on both the doses required for the( PI) of fresh and durable commodities infested withspecific pests, and also the radiation doses used to induce sterility in target pests, mainly for the application of the sterile insect technique.  The new IDCT database complements IDIDAS with commodity tolerance data for fresh horticultural commodities including fruit, vegetables, flowers, roots and tubers.  Tolerance data were extracted from scientific publications available from 1960 to the present.  Specific technical information was selected to identify the maximum doses for acceptable quality, the type of radiation source, the dose rate, dose

uniformity ration (DUR), and the optimal conditions for handling, storage, and transportation.  The availability of this information in the IDCT database greatly facilitates the process of identifying potential trade opportunities using PI and helps highlight where commodity tolerance research has been done or is needed.

Speaker
Biography:

Para Dholakia is an Assistant Professor in Food Technology for past 13 years. She has done MSc in Food and Nutrition after graduation in Food Technology and currently pursuing PhD from University of Delhi. She has guided MSc dissertations and worked as Nutrition Advisor with industry. She is currently working on a project on development of mobile application to track nutritional intake of people. She has attended various national and international conferences and published papers. She has been the secretary of Association of Food Scientists and Technologists of India, Delhi.

Abstract:

Microwave cooking has emerged as a popular cooking method in past few years. Data on nutritive value along with the sensory characteristics of food cooked in microwave ovens in relation to traditional methods is insufficient. A study was planned to compare the nutrient composition and sensory characteristics of foods cooked by microwave cooking and traditional cooking. Fifteen dishes were selected from different food groups based on a survey done on a small population (N=200). The dishes were prepared by both traditional as well as microwave cooking and analyzed for sensory characteristics and proximate composition using standard procedures. There was no significant (p<0.05) difference in fat content and ash content. Nine dishes showed significantly higher retention of vitamin C in microwave cooked foods as compared to traditionally cooked food. Mineral content remained same in both the methods. Thus both the techniques showed similar effects on nutritive value except Vitamin C. Sensory attributes like appearance(browning of crust), texture and flavor were better in traditionally baked, roasted and boiled foods than in microwave cooked ones, however, color of greens did not differ significantly between the two methods. This preliminary study helped to draw the conclusion that both the techniques didn’t differ in affecting the nutritive value except Vitamin C whereas, sensory characteristics were obtained better with traditional cooking. The study can be extended further to compare the effect of microwave and traditional cooking on vitamin B complex group, fat soluble vitamins, biological value and protein efficiency ratio.