Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 15th International Conference on Food Processing & Technology Rome, Italy.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Food Technology-2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ozlem Tokusoglu photo
Biography:

She completed her PhD from Ege University in the Department of Food Engineering, Izmir, Turkey. She professionally worked at the Ege University Department of Chemistry and Food Engineering. Tokuşoğlu was research associate at the Food Science and Nutrition Department at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA and at the School of Food Science, Washington State University, Pullman, in the State of Washington, USA. Tokuşoğlu, is currently also working as associate professor, faculty member in Department of Food Engineering of Celal Bayar University. Her study focuses on nutrition, food quality control, food chemistry, food safety, toxicology, shelf-life of foods and innovative food processing technologies and functional products. Her specific study areas are phenolics, phytochemicals, bioactive antioxidatives and anticarcinogens components and food toxicants.Tokuşoğlu has conducted academic research studies, keynote addresses, and academic presentations at many countries and meetings. She has published more than 150 studies in journals and conferences, she is book editor of CRC Press Taylor and Francis and has three scientific books. She has been serving as an editorial board member and associate editor, section editor of scientific journals. She administrated many international conferences in USA, and Europe. She has also been working at Technology Conferences as Organizing Committee member and she is also Chair of the Conference series LLC’s Food Technology conferenceseries.

 

Abstract:

Consumers around the world are better educated and more demanding in their identification and purchase of quality health-promoting foods. The food industry and regulatory agencies are searching for innovative technologies to provide safe and stable foods for their clientele. Thermal pasteurization and commercial sterilization of foods provide safe and nutritious foods that, unfortunately, are of en heated beyond a safety factor that results in unacceptable quality and nutrient retention. Innovative nonthermal processing technologies offer unprecedented opportunities and challenges for the food industry to market safe, high quality health-promoting foods. The development of non thermal processing technologies for food processing is providing an excellent balance between safety and minimal processing, between acceptable economic constraints and superior quality, and between unique approaches and traditional processing resources. Non-thermal technologies are useful not only for inactivation of microorganisms and enzymes, but also to improve yield and development of ingredients and marketable foods with novel quality and nutritional characteristics. The presentation devotes attention to improving food functionality with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and pulsedelectricfields (PEF). The focus on improving the quality and retaining bioactive constituents of foods and improving the quality of fruits, vegetables, dairy, egg, meat and seafood products with HHP is evident. Improving food functionality with pulse delectricfield (PEF) processes are focused on dairy and egg products and fruitjuices. In this context, the casestudies concerning natural anti-carcinogen phenolic bioactives and toxigenic mycotoxins in various types of foods were approached.

 

Keynote Forum

Ian A Watson

University of Glasgow, Glasgow
USA

Keynote: Advances in decontamination technology as a solution for improved food safety

Time : 10:00-10:30

OMICS International Food Technology-2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ian A Watson photo
Biography:

Ian A Watson has done his First degree in Applied Physics, followed by a PhD from the School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, in “Optimizing the gaseous discharge and optical coupling of a pulsed CO2 laser”. He has extensively researched on the effects of high power laser beams on microorganisms and laser sterilization and inactivation; has published on direct effects of lasers and their efficacy on decontaminating different substrates (solids, liquids and air) and a range of microorganisms (E. coli to B. atrophaeus, an anthrax simulant). He has investigated the real time detection techniques of bacteria and microalgae for improved biofuel production. He is a Reader in Applied Energy.

Abstract:

There remains significant global illnesses and death from pathogens entering the food chain. To this end, best practice can reduce the likelihood of infection but active measures are constantly being developed. Uptake of novel ideas by industry is often slow. This may be due to a number of reasons e.g. cost or the perceived risk of these technologies being less efficient than conventional practice. A review is given on the scale of the current problems, both financially and in terms of the unnecessary deaths that occur per year and why uptake is slow. Potential solutions to solve these problems are discussed, with emphasis placed on developing improved protocols and establishing methods on how industry can uptake improved technological solutions. Advanced protocols can help establish improved practice. Detection can play a vital role in identifying contamination; consequently, the role of real time detection systems in reducing infection will be evaluated along with their role in improving advanced decontamination system performance.

  • SPECIAL SESSION

Session Introduction

Mohammed Farid

University of Auckland, New Zealand

Title: Innovation in food sterilization

Time : 10:30-11:15

Speaker
Biography:

Mohammed Farid has completed his BE in Chemical Engineering from the  University of Baghdad, Iraq (1971), ME in Chemical Engineering from University of Swansea, Wales (1975) and PhD in Chemical Reactor Engineering from the University of Swansea, Wales in the UK. He is a Fellow of the Institution of Chemical Engineers, London and an active member of a number of international institutions. He has published more than 360 papers in international journals and refereed international conferences, 6 patents, 5 books, and 11 chapters in books. He has received a number of international awards such as the Matsumae International Fellowship from Japan (1986), the Hisham Hijjawi Award for Outstanding Scientific Achievement in Research in 1993, and the Marie Curie Fellowship, from European Union in 2010. He was invited as a keynote speaker to a large number of international conferences worldwide such as iFOOD2013 in Hannover.  He has initiated and established the research in NZ in non-thermal processing of food, including high pressure processing, pulsed electric field and UV, more than 15 years ago. In 2015, he was awarded by the International Association of Engineering and Food (IAEF) the “Lifetime Achievement Award”

Abstract:

Food sterilization is a well-established technology and maybe classified into (1) in-can sterilization and (2) Ultra high temperature short-time sterilization (UHT). The first is batch while the second is a continuous process. Both techniques require exposing the food to a high temperature (121°C to 140°C), which destroy all types of microorganisms including spoilage microorganism such as spores. However, in-can sterilization destroys most vitamins and other nutrients while UHT is known to change the flavor of food products such as milk, making it unfavorable by many consumers. Demands of consumers for higher quality and fresh tasting products are growing rapidly, which requires development of new processing technologies. Recently, non-conventional sterilization technologies have gained significant attention, since they have the potential to provide products with a better quality, fresh-like taste, and may even require lower energy. This presentation outlines the possibilities of combining one of the well-known methods of non-thermal processing such as pulsed electric field (PEF), high pressure (HPP), UV, ultrasound, irradiation and cold plasma with heat treatment. The main objective of such combinations of treatments is to lower overall treatment temperature/ time in order to produce food products of high quality. We recently have shown that the combination of PEF with heat could lower sterilization temperature of milk and hence reducing thermal damage to the nutrient in it.

  • Networking & Refreshment Break 11:15-11:30
  • WORKSHOP
Speaker
Biography:

Osama O Ibrahim is a highly-experienced Principal Research Scientist with particular expertise in the field of Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Food Safety, and Bio-processing for both pharmaceutical and food ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening/culture improvement; molecular biology and fermentation research for antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids and food flavors; Biochemistry for metabolic pathways and enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bioconversion, and Analytical Biochemistry. He was external research liaison for Kraft Foods with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and microbial screening and holds three bio-processing patents. In January 2005, he accepted an early retirement offer from Kraft Foods and in the same year he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for new startup biotechnology and food companies.

Abstract:

Continue increasing demand of fossil fuels is causing the concern of global warming due to increasing greenhouse gas remission and increasing energy supply insecurity due to politically unstable countries producing fossil fuels. These concerns are helping the production of bio-fuels as one of alternative approaches to decrease these concerns. Bio-fuels are produced from feed stocks or utilizing lands that could be used to produce foods. United States, Brazil, and Europe are the leading nations for the production of bio-fuels.  Carbohydrate crops such as corn, wheat, rice, potato, sugar cane and sugar beets are the major feed stocks for the production of bio ethanol. Oil seed crops such as canola, sunflower, and soy beans are the major feed stocks for the production of bio diesel.  As bio-fuels productions continue to compete with food productions, the assumption that this competition will drive up food price volatility and increase hunger in poor countries. The only way to reduce the impact of bio-fuels on food production is to de-link food and bio-fuels production. This can be accomplished through development of new bio-fuels technologies from second generation feed stocks that are not part of food supply. Such approach can be accomplished by utilizing agriculture residues, by-products from bio-process manufacturing, and capturing biomasses that are currently treated as waste, or utilizing non agriculture land that are not suitable to cultivate food crops but only suitable to grow plants or microbes that are  dedicated to bio-fuels as feed stocks and not  to produce foods. The major problem that did not allow these two approaches as second generation feed stocks technologies to develop on large commercial scale are due to several factors mainly, storage and transportation cost of these feed stocks, low bio-fuels production yield, long manufacturing process and high production costs. More R&D studies and experiments are necessary for the commercialization of bio-fuels from these second generation feed stocks in the near future.

Speaker
Biography:

She completed her PhD from Ege University in the Department of Food Engineering, Izmir, Turkey. She professionally worked at the Ege University Department of Chemistry and Food Engineering. Tokuşoğlu was research associate at the Food Science and Nutrition Department at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA and at the School of Food Science, Washington State University, Pullman, in the State of Washington, USA. Tokuşoğlu, is currently also working as associateprofessor, faculty member in Department of Food Engineering of Celal Bayar University. Her study focusses on nutrition, food quality control, food chemistry, food safety, toxicology, shelf-life of foods and innovative food processing technologies and functional products. Her specific study areas are phenolics, phytochemicals, bioactive antioxidatives and anticarcinogens components and food toxicants.Tokuşoğlu has conducted academic research studies, keynote addresses, and academic presentations at many countries and meetings. She has published moret han 150 studies in journals andconferences, she is book editor of CRC Press Taylor and Francis and has three scientific books. She has been serving as an editorial board member and associate editor, section editor of scientific journals. She administrated many international conferences in USA, and Europe. She has also been working at Conferenceseries LLC Food Technology Conferences as Organizing Committee member and she is also Chair of the Conferenceseries LLC Nutrition Conference Series and Food Technology conferenceseries.

 

Abstract:

Phenolic compounds, ubiquitous in fruits, vegetables and plants, are of considerable interest and have received great attention in recently owing to their bioactive functions. Polyphenols are amongst the most desirable phytochemicals due to their antioxidant activity and those components are known as secondary plant metabolites and possess also antimicrobial, antiviral and anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogen properties along with their high antioxidant capacity. Plant phenolics, especally such as flavonoids, phenolic acids lignans and stilbenoids, modulates everal important biological processes in mammalian cells and show anticarcinogenic properties in preclinical PCamodels and concerning studies are limited. Morusnigra is a deciduous tree growing to 10-13 m tall and  it is mulberry type especially specific to asian continent. Its edible fruits are dark violet or black colour. Anatolia is home of the mulberry fruit and one of the oldest culture area. In many agricultural areas of our country, high quality mulberry fruit is grown owing to the cultivation conditions are so convenient. It is reported that black mulberry fruit have antidiabetic, antioxidative, and anti-inflammatuar effects and it is positive efficient on urinary system. It contains phenolic phytochemicals as intense degree. Black mulberry fruit is rich in carotenoid and flavonoid bioactives, also alkaloids, vitamins, oils (linoleicacid, palmiticacid, oleicacid), sugars (glucose, fructose) and minerals are other constituents. Due to its antioxidant content, the antioxidant activity of black mulberry is high and its bioactive compounds, flavonoids and anthocyanins are in quite wide range. Black mulberries contain rutin, myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol  as flavonols; isoquercetin (quercetin 3-O-4C1-B-D-glucoside) as flavonol glycosides; p-coumaric, p-hydroxybenzoic, chlorogenic, ferulic, gallic, vanillicasidler as phenolicacids ; (+)-catechin, epicatechin, epigallocatechingallat as flavanols; morusin, moracin M2, cyclomorusin, apigenin as flavon structure phenolic compounds;  naringenin as flavonon; cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, cyanidin 3-O-rutinoside,  pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside, pelargonidin 3-O-rutinoside as anthocyanins and cyanidin, pelargonidin phenolics as  aglycon  forms of anthocyanins (called as anthocyanidins); resveratrol as stilbens; oxyresveratrol,  mulberroside A  (Oxyresveratrol-4-O-b-D- glucopyranosyl-3 9 -O-b-D-glucopyranoside or 2, 4, 3 9 , 5 9 -tetrahydroxys- tilbene), kuwanon C5, kuwanon C6 as resorsinol type phenolic compounds;  β sitosterol-3-O-β-Dglucoside as steroidal saponins; ursolicacid, oleanolicacid as triterpenicacids.
The studies of the flavonoid fractions obtained from black mulberry (Morusnigra) on antiproliferation of cancer cell lines and its anti-cancer effects are limited. It is reported that major phenolic substance morusinflavon in Morus alba type white mulberries has been inactive the STAT3 signals in prostate cancer cells (PCa) and has been triggered apoptosis (cell death) and no findings could be found belongs to Morusnigra (black mulberry). Besides, antiproliferative effects of the bioactive profiles of white colour mulberries on hepatocarcinoma cell lines (HepG2) was determined and it is reported that white mulberry bioactive compounds are effective on liver cancer and no findings could be found belongs to Morusnigra (black mulberry). It is put forwarded that apigeninflavon phenolic in all mulberry types can be blocked human T-24 bladder cancer cells and and has been triggered apoptosis.

 

  • Lunch Break 13:00-14:00
  • ORAL SESSION: Food Processing & Technology | Food Nanotechnology | Food Engineering Model: Past, Present & Future | Post Harvest & Food Packaging Technology | IPR in Food Technology
Speaker

Chair

Ozlem Tokusoglu

Celal Bayar University
Turkey

Speaker

Co-Chair

Ian Watson

University of Glasgow
UK

Session Introduction

Conrad Perera

University of Auckland
New Zealand

Title: Electrospinning as a novel encapsulation method for food applications

Time : 14:00-14:20

Speaker
Biography:

He received his PhD from Oregon State University and has many years of work experience in the food industry research institutes and academia. His main research area is Chemistry and technology of processing of food products, with special emphasis in dehydration and functional foods. Currently he is working on Vitamin D stability in foods and bioactive peptides from food waste. Dr Neo Yun Ping received her PhD from the University of Auckland in 2014 supervised by Professor Perera. She is currently a lecturer in Food Science at Taylor College in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

 

Abstract:

The main objective of this work was to better understand the procedure of electrospinning as a one-step encapsulation approach to acquire active component loaded nanostructured biopolymeric fibers. The impact of solution and processing parameters to the fabrication of zein electrospun fibers were investigated. Gallic acid was used as the model active component to determine the performance of loaded fibers using electrospinning as an encapsulation technique. The fabricated galic acid loaded zein (Ze-GA) fibers were appraised for various physicochemical characterizations including morphology, distribution of gallic acid in the electrospun fibers and thermal analyses. Results obtained indicated that interactions occurred between gallic acid and zein at the molecular level. Nevertheless, gallic acid preserved its phenolic character and antioxidant activity after electrospinning. Evidence for the efficacy and effectiveness of gallic acid in the fiber mat for food contact applications was determined by evaluating its release performance, mechanism of action, cytotoxicity and antimicrobial abilities. The fast release profile of gallic acid from the electrospun fibers is due to the large surface area and its localization on the fiber surface. The Ze-GA electrospun fibers are not cytotoxic and exhibited antimicrobial properties. Heat-curing improved the morphological stability of Ze-GA fibers to strengthen their structure and physical properties. All the electrospun fiber mats exhibited characteristic of α–helix rich protein. Overall, electrospinning has proven to be a versatile and promising approach that is capable of generating functionalized nanofibers suitable for food applications.

 

Speaker
Biography:

She has completed her 1st Ph.D at the age of 25 years from the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa. She is an associate professor of Food technology of Pisa University. In 2008, she received a “Special Mention” at “Montana Premium” for Food Science Research (with her colleague Venturi F.). She has published more than 100 papers in  journals or volumes and serving as a referee for research projects and papers. She was a scientific responsible for an Original Patent (PT2009A000018), an author of two Original Patents of Pisa University. She was Invited Speaker and part of the organizing committee for several national and international workshops and conferences.

 

Abstract:

The way of selling wines has changed dramatically in the last fifty years. If before we depended from the small national markets and from the media, scarcely spread and limited to the specialists, recently the globalization and the arrival of the web have revolutionized everything. Today is possible to share the knowledge (with zero costs through the social media) of the existence of particular products all over the world. All of that has generated the birth of infinite niches, which put together represent considerable volumes. The obligation of differentiate themselves in order to acquire attention from the customers has forced the wine merchants of any country to get wines with an history, an identity or at least some particular or unique characteristic (Cinelli Colombini S., 2015). The  clear target of any market is “the wines have to be healthier with less added chemicals”.  The Only wine project is an experimentation conducted starting from  2013 by the DAFE (University of Pisa) using both white grapes (2013) and repeated using red grapes of Sangiovese (2014), in parallel at University of Pisa and in Fattoria dei Barbi, located in Montalcino. The grapes have been worked in total absence of oxygen, with specific equipment at the University of Pisa and at Fattoria dei Barbi. No addition of any chemical product were carried out, only a light enrichment with MCR (Concentrated Rectified Must) in order to reach the 13% volume in alcohol in Fattoria dei Barbi in 2014. A protocol made by University of  Pisa has been followed (patent n. BI1217F/FSBR/fev) and all the proceedings and processing was done in vats saturated with CO2 from natural origin in Montalcino and at the University. The wine from the first vinification of white grapes in 2013 is still stable. The sample of red wine from Sangiovese has been available for whoever is interested, giving the possibility to judge the good quality. This project would like to represent an example of an innovative technology, useful within reasonable costs, which allows substantial reduction of chemistry in every step of the wine making.

 

Speaker
Biography:

She has 1st Ph.D at the age of 28 years from the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa. She is a researcher in Food Technology of Pisa University. In 2008, she received a "Special Mention" at "Montana Premium" for Food Science Research (with her colleague Zinnai A.). She published more than 90 papers in journals or volumes and serving as a referee for ACS journals. She was an author in two original patent of Pisa University. She was Invited Speaker and part of the Organizing Committee for several Conferences organized by Conferenceseries LLc in past years.

 

Abstract:

When used in optimized proportions, sourdough can improve volume, texture, flavour, nutritional value of bread and increase the shelf life by retarding the staling process and protecting bread from mould and bacterial spoilage. In this context, the objective of the paper is twofold: a) to verify the influence of different baking procedures adopted by different artisanal bakeries on the sourdough composition and performance; b) to determine if and how the operating conditions adopted  can affect the chemical composition and the sensory characteristics of the bread. The preliminary results obtained indicate that chemical composition of sourdough and bread, as well as sensorial expression of corresponding bread, might be greatly influenced by the operating conditions adopted during baking. In particular, when the activity of hetero lactic bacteria was promoted (Fermentation Ratio FR @ 3.0), the bread showed the worst sensorial expression in terms of taste and structural characteristics of the crumb.

 

Speaker
Biography:

She is an Adjunct Professor and Cereal Program Manager at The Department of Food Science having extensive research experiences working with the grain industry in Canada such as millers, bakers and food developers. She is highly skilled in the fields of grain chemistry and biochemistry. Dr. Ragaee has been working in the areas of effects of processing on bioactive components in cereal products, functionality of different prebiotics on the shelf life and quality of frozen dough, ingredient interactions and their functionality in different formulas, gluten-free products and developing high fiber functional wheat products for the functional food industry. All research projects in Dr. Ragaee laboratory are supported by several food industries in Canada.

Abstract:

The incidence of celiac and other gluten intolerances is growing worldwide. At present the only effective remedy is strict lifetime adherence to a gluten-free diet. However, the quality of gluten-free products available in the market is not comparable to that made from wheat, and the search for gluten alternatives is needed. A major gap in the current knowledge is how to modify proteins from gluten-free grains to mimic functionality of wheat gluten. Zein is a class of prolamins obtained from corn fractionation as a by-product. Zein could hold a potential to replace gluten in gluten-free formulas due to its ability to form a viscoelastic protein network when mixed with water and held above its glass transition temperature (30oC). The objective of this study was to assess protein secondary structure of zein during dough mixing at 40oC. The effect of different additives (hydrocolloids, crosslinking enzymes and proteins) on structure of zein-starch dough was investigated. Dough properties were evaluated by a Farinograph. Secondary structure analysis was conducted by deconvoluting the amide I band (1600-1700 cm-1). Results demonstrated that some additives were able to induce extensive and stable β-turns which resulted in zein-starch dough with similar functionality to a wheat viscoelastic system. More data will be presented and discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

She has completed her PhD in Educational Management on year 2012 at the Cagayan State University-Aparri garnering an outstanding rating in her dissertation presentation. She is presently an Associate Professor IV at the Cagayan State University-Aparri particularly teaching major subjects at the College of Hospitality Industry Management. She had already received a patent in making the process of aramang-dragon fruit flavored ice cream which was her main inspiration in drafting this reserach venture.

 

Abstract:

The main purpose of the research venture is to develop a new flavor of ice cream, one of universally patronized desserts. It was ventured upon to make a new flavor showcasing the author’s place main seafood produce which is aramang (Nematopalaemon tenuipes) and the tropical country fruit product mango (Mangifera indica); thus, from the research undertaking, the authors presented four aramang-mango flavored ice cream as they let 81 evaluators from diverse age groups to know the most acceptable aramang-mango flavored ice cream formulation. Based on the findings, the ratio of 125 g aramang and 375 g mango is the most preferred mixture to the prospective consumers, as it is most acceptable in terms of taste, appearance, texture, aroma and general acceptability. Female consumers tend to like higher proportions of aramang in the concoctions.  For this reason, entrepreneurs should initially produce aramang:mango ice cream with 125:375 ratio, then gradually shift to lesser mango ratio.

 

Betul Güroy

Yalova University, Turkey

Title: The effects on C-Phycocyanin of different drying methods

Time : 15:00-16:00

Speaker
Biography:

Betul Guroy has completed her PhD from Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University and Post-doctoral studies from Yalova University. She is the Director of Algae Culture Unit and Department of Food Processing. She has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals. 

Abstract:

C-Phycocyanin (C-PC) is a dark-blue pigment found in the blue-green microalgae, mainly in Spirulina. Phycocyanin can help to regulate a variety of important enzymes needed for the synthesis of human metabolism, inhibition of cancer cell growth and promote human cell regeneration. Phycocyanin has been recommended by oncologists due to pharmaceutic effects. Phycocyanin use in industrial applications has become more important with increasing purity ratio. In the pharmaceutical industry, the degree of purity of phycocyanin (A620) / (A280) is required to be 4 or more. In the food industry, the degree of purity of phycocyanin that is expected to be higher than 0.7 and 2 purity is widely accepted. Heat treatment has a significant impact on the quality of the extractable phycocyanin. In this trial we aimed to compare content of C-phycocyanin extracted from Spirulina powder produced by freeze drying and oven drying techniques. Phycocyanin concentration in the blue supernatant of samples obtained from freeze drying method was 0.37 mg/mL and higher than other group. Phycocyanin yield was found 41.3 mg/g at the freeze dried samples and 37.7 mg/g at the oven dried samples. The purity ratio of phycocyanin was achieved in samples of freeze dried and oven dried as 2.7 and 2.5 at reagent grade, respectively. The highest phycocyanin yield, content and purity ratio was obtained from Spirulina platensis powder processed by freeze drying.

Break: Networking & Refreshments 16:00-16:15

Sanjay Mukherjee

Sheffield Hallam University
UK

Title: Waste heat recovery in food & drink industry

Time : 16:15-16:35

Speaker
Biography:

He joined Sheffield Hallam University in 2015 as a Reasearch Associate in an Innovate UK funded project on waste heat recovery. He obtained his PhD in Carbon Capture and Storage from University of Surrey, UK. He has worked in collaboration with leading research groups from Cambridge University, Imperial College and Tsinghua University for an EPSRC funded project and has published papers in reputed journals. He has also worked as a technical consultant for Office of Carbon Capture and Storage at Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), London after PhD.

 

Abstract:

Most baking processes in the food manufacturing sector involve use of gas-fired ovens. Only about one-third of the total energy used in these ovens adds value to the final product. The remaining two-thirds is discharged with the exhaust gases at 150-250oC and thus represents an opportunity for heat recovery. However, the low temperature range, fouling and presence of corrosive materials in the exhaust streams make heat recovery technically challenging and uneconomical. The existing low grade heat recovery technolgies mostly use gas to liquid heat transfer to produce hot water for use in other areas of the manufacturing plant. The performance of these systems is governed by hot water demand in the factory and is therefore not recommended if there are frequent fluctuations in demand or if a more efficient technology, such as combined heat and power, is already in place. This study involves design, manufacturing and testing of a novel low-temperature gas to gas heat recovery system using an array of heat pipe heat exchangers, for industrial-scale baking ovens at a large confectionary manufacturing plant. Unlike gas to liquid heat transfer, a gas to gas heat transfer system provides direct savings in oven fuel consumption, independent of the hot water and other energy demands elsewhere in the plant. The heat recovery potential of the system is estimated using a thermodynamic model developed based on energy and mass balance for the ovens. The design enables recovery of up to 50% of the energy available through the exhaust stack, increasing the energy efficiency of the overall process to 60% and reducing food manufacturing costs by one third.

Nada El Darra

Beirut Arab University
Lebanon

Title: β‑Cyclodextrin Assisted Extraction of Polyphenols from peach pomace

Time : 16:35-16:55

Speaker
Biography:

She obtained her BSc in Life and Earth Sciences from Saint-Joseph University, Lebanon in 2007.  She earned her M.Sc. in Food chemistry with honors from Saint-Joseph University, Lebanon in 2009. Then worked as a Quality manager at Conserves Modernes Chtaura_Lebanon. In 2013, She obtained a certificate entitled “ISO 22000:2005” Food safety management System Lead Auditor from RABQSA. She was subsequently awarded a scholarship to pursue her PhD under a joint program between Saint-Joseph University and University of Technology of Compiègne_France. She obtained in 2013 a PhD in Food chemistry from Saint-Joseph University and a PhD in Industrial Process Engineering and Sustainable Development from University of Technology of Compiègne_France. After completing her PhD, she worked in 2014 as a Quality manager at Abido Spices_Neemeh_Lebanon. She has a number of publications in peer-reviewed journals. In 2014, She was appointed as an assistant professor at Nutrition & Dietetics department, Faculty of Health sciences, at Beirut Arab University

Abstract:

Peach byproducts, generated yearly, are disposed as waste despite their content in high-added value molecules. Amongst the latter, polyphenols are bioactive molecules with interesting health-promoting properties. In this study the recovery of polyphenols from peach pomace was conducted by an eco-friendly and cost effective method using a GRAS food additive: β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). The efficiency of β-CD was compared to that of organic solvent (ethanol) extraction at the same concentrations (1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5%). Both quantitative and qualitative (antiradical activity) analyses were conducted on the extracted polyphenols. The highest polyphenol (0.72 mg GAE/g DM) and flavonoïd (0.35 mg catechin/g of DM) concentrations so as the maximal antiradical activity (6.82 %) were obtained after 2 hours of diffusion at 50 °C with an aqueous β-CD (5%) solvent. At the same ethanol concentration (5%), extracts showed lower yields of polyphenols (0.63 mg GAE/g DM) and an inferior antiradical activity. Polyphenol encapsulation in β-CD was thought to protect them from oxidation and degradation. The results clearly show the competitiveness of β-CD assisted extraction to recover a high quantity and quality of polyphenols from peach pomace. This study suggests a green and GRAS process for biomolecule extraction from food byproducts recommending the use of β-CD as an alternative to organic solvents. 

Speaker
Biography:

He has completed his master from Hacettepe University and continues his phD studies at Hacettepe University, too. His partners, Meryem Goksel Sarac and Zehra Saba Keskin, are both phD students at Erciyes University and Cumhuriyet University. All members of the team are lecturers at Food Technology programme of Yildizeli Vocational School, Cumhuriyet University. This abstract was derived and financed from Scientific Research Project of Cumhuiyet University. The project’s coordinator is Fazil Yozgat, an associate professor at Cumhuriyet University.

 

Abstract:

Meat ball is known as the most sensitive food product towards microbiological spoilage because of its physical and chemical properties. Meat and meat products have the biggest ratio as 70% among foodborne diseases. Nisin and natamycin are natural compounds that intended of inhibition of microorganisms. Especially natamycin is patented antibiotics for promising to carcass decontamination and an alternative to chemicals like trisodium phosphate and chloride. Farming and meat industry are important daily breads for country public. In these sectors, neglecting of hygiene and standards were suspected and this was determined as research subject and detected. Samples that were included antimicrobials at different ratios, were analyzed in 0., 5., 10 and 15th days. Structural changes of samples were examined during storage period. In this project, meatball samples whose quality criteria were defined and which were supplied from Yildizeli the district of Sivas, were analyzed physicochemical and microbiologically after adding nisin and natamycin at different ratios. Both nisin and natamycin were added to meatball samples in concentration to 0 (control group), 2.5 and 5.0 g/kg. Moisture, ash, fat, pH, microbiological analyses and sensory properties of the all samples were evaluated.  While any physically or chemically differences were not identified between all samples, sensory property values of control group and nisin added group were the same. Study showed that the results were acceptable for the use of these antimicrobials in meatball and were increased the shelf life of meatballs.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Ahsen Ezel Bildik has completed her Bachelor’s, Master’s and PhD studies at Istanbul University, Faculty of Forestry, Forest Engineering Department (Istanbul). She is currently working as Researcher in Istanbul University. She is expert on packaging quality and quantity. Her specific study areas are on nutraceuticals additives of paper making and packaging, paper surface coating applications with antimicrobial materials and corrugated board strength properties evaluation.

Abstract:

Paper is made from cellulose, a natural polymer and has remarkable properties. Hydrogen bonded structure gives the paper strength against their lightweight construction and heat durability without thermal decomposition. Also, porous surface coating color easily applies with papers. Moreover, it is shown that with natural antimicrobial or antioxidant agent coated paper extends the shelf life of food products. Rhus coriaria L., commonly known as sumac, grows wild in the region of the Mediterranean coastline in Turkey. Sumac has significant phenolic phytochemical constituents as tannins, flavonoids, anthocyanins, organic acids, flavones, proteins and fiber. Total phenolic (TP) of sumac powder applied was 732 mg of gallic acid/100g while antioxidant activity as effective scavenging concentration (EC50) on DPPH radical was 6.02μg/mL. Sumac is natural bioactive agents that suitable material for coating color due to its anthocyanine components. Also after coating with sumac powder, several fatty products can be protective from oxidation. In this study, wrapping paper, paper board and test liner chosen as base paper. Starch was used as a binder. Sumac was added to the starch solution at 10% (w/w) applied on one side at 4.5 g/m². The paper was coated with #0 drawdown bar and then tested the paper strength properties. As a result, sumac coated paper gained antioxidant activity. However; coated paper had lower strength properties comparing to uncoated paper, but this strength lost could be relieved using wet strength agents.

Ranjana Singh

University of Delhi, India

Title: Development of soy fortified Indian traditional snacks

Time : 17:35-17:55

Speaker
Biography:

Ranjana Singh earned her PhD in Food Technology from the G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar and is currently working as an Associate Professor, Food Technology at University of Delhi, India. During 25 years of tenure, she has participated in the development of the Institute and has successfully fulfilled several responsibilities including the organization of student placements, the re-organization of the curriculum in accordance with University norms and industry demand, and the organization of various workshops & national conference. One of her key achievements is development of value added new product concepts which enhanced the creative & research ability of students, encouraging their entrepreneurship dreams. Her research has been published in reputed international journals and has also been presented in international conferences in the US and South Africa.

Abstract:

Soy foods have long been important in Asian diets, where they are valued for their nutrient content and culinary versatility. For health conscious Indians, soy foods are among the variety of healthful options for meeting protein needs. Soy foods are reported to have lower risk of coronary heart diseases, osteoporosis, and certain cancers and help alleviate menopausal symptoms. Five value added Indian traditional snacks viz. Multigrain soy bar, Soy vermicelli, Soy cookies, Soy chips, Soy phirni & Guava soy bar were developed to prototype form and studied for their sensory acceptability and shelf-life study. These products could be easily formulated using locally available raw materials at a reasonable cost and the good organoleptic characteristics combined with high protein & minerals make these products suitable for common man & especially for school children, adolescents, pregnant & lactating females. Results of the present study showed that these Indian traditional foods under study could be successfully fortified with defatted soy flour (20% level) or soy milk (50% level) to increase their nutritive value in terms of quality proteins, minerals, vitamins and phyto-chemicals without altering their sensory aspects and acceptability. Moreover, these products can help alleviating malnutrition and in improving the nutritional status of millions of impoverished undernourished kinds.

Speaker
Biography:

Kaci M has completed her graduation in Food Engineering from Higher National School of Agronomy, Algeria, and then she obtained a Master’s degree in Food and Biotechnological Science from Nancy University, France. In 2015, she was awarded a PhD from The University of Lorraine, France. She is currently a post-doctoral student and conducts her research on the Stabilization of Nanoemulsions and Vectorization of Hydrophobic Compounds.

Abstract:

To improve encapsulation and release of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), emulsifier-free-emulsions were developed with a new emulsification process by high frequency ultrasound (HFU) at 1.7 MHz. Nano-emulsions containing CoQ10 were elaborated with or without rapeseed lecithin used as emulsifier. The prepared emulsions with HFU was compared with CoQ10 emulsion containing emulsifier developed with the same emulsification technique and also with low frequency ultrasounds coupled with high pressure homogenization (LFU+HPH). The physico-chemical properties of emulsions were determined by: average droplets size measurement with nano-droplets tracking analysis, droplets surface charge with ζ potential measurement, surface tension and rheological behavior. Emulsions made by LFU+HPH with emulsifier showed lower droplets size due to cavitation generated by HFU process. Surface tension results showed that whatever the preparation process, there was no significant difference between emulsions containing lecithin emulsifier, with or without CoQ10. In vitro biocompatibility tests were performed on human mesenchymal stem cells in order to show the cytotoxicity of various formulations and also the efficiency of CoQ10-loaded emulsion. In vitro tests proved that the vectors were not toxic for cells. Furthermore, CoQ10 provided high rate of cell proliferation and metabolic activity especially for the formulation without emulsifier.