Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology London, UK.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Osama O. Ibrahim

Bioinnovation
USA

Keynote: Biotechnology in the field of food science and technology

Time : 09:00-09:25

OMICS International Food Technology-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Osama O. Ibrahim photo
Biography:

Osama O. Ibrahim is a highly experienced, principal research scientist with particular expertise in the field of microbiology, molecular biology, food safety, and bio-processing for both pharmaceutical and food ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening /culture improvement; molecular biology and fermentation research for antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids, food flavors, biochemistry for metabolic pathways and enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bio-conversion, and analytical biochemistry. He was external research liaison for Kraft Foods with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and microbial screening and holds three bioprocessing patents. In January 2005, he accepted an early retirement offer from Kraft Foods and in the same year he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for new start up biotechnology and food companies.

Abstract:

Biotechnology is the basic and applied sciences of living systems and their engineering aspects required to exploit the bioprocess to bring bio ingredients and bio products to the market place. While our understanding of biotechnology has rapidly advanced in recent years beyond production of alcohol and fermented foods to the production of bio ingredients and refined products with tremendous applications in improving food raw materials, food production and producing healthy ingredients that will improve human health. Since biotechnology is a collection of techniques some of which may involve genetic engineering for the production of genetically modified foods or genetically modified organisms (GMO). The term “genetically modified foods” is applied only to products that have been genetically engineered. Genetically modified foods have been hailed by some people as the technology that will be able to solve the world’s food problems and is denounced by other as a dangerous technology on several grounds, including health safety issues environmental concerns even it is regulated under the same United States laws that govern the health, safety, efficacy and environmental impacts. The history of biotechnology in food industry, current status and its future perspective will be highlighted in this presentation.

OMICS International Food Technology-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mirjana Menkovska photo
Biography:

Mirjana Menkovska is full Professor at the Department of Food Technology and Biotechnology at the Institute of Animal Science, Sts.Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, Macedonia. Her background is Food Technology. She graduated at the Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy in Skopje in 1976, took M.S. Degree in Instrumental Analysis at the same University in 1982, and Ph.D. degree in Food Technology at the University of Belgrade, Serbia. She was research visiting scientist at GMRC in Manhattan, Kansas, USA, during the academic 1985/86, at Cereal Research Institute in Detmold, Germany in 1997, and at many other known research centers in Europe. She published more than hundred thirty papers in domestic and foreign scientific journals; and participated at more than sixty scientific meetings in the country and abroad. She was for a long time member of AACC, RACI and ICC National Delegate, and member of many Scientific Committees at International and Domestic scientific conferences.

Abstract:

With aim to find out the influence of organic farming on cereal quality properties, a comparative analyses were conducted on nutritional composition on selected cereals-wheat, rye, barley, oat and millet, which were grown by organic and conventional farming in three locations. Standard methods of analysis were applied in the analyses on the value of ash, dry matter, protein and fat. Standardized enzymatic-gravimetric methods-the Megazyme Total Dietary Fiber Kit and mixed-linkage β-glucan assay kit (Megazyme Ireland) were used in the analyses of the value of total dietary fiber (TDF) and its compounds-soluble dietary fibre (SF), insoluble dietary fibre (ISF) and β-glucans. Cereal kind-farming method by chemical-technological trait biplot analysis was also applied within R 2.9.0 program environment (R Development Core Team, 2010) to investigate associations between average value of the particular cereal nutrients and farming type.\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\nIn comparison with the conventionally grown cereals, some of the organic grown cereals have shown a significant increase in the value of ash, crude protein, and fat as well as of the value of TDF and ISF (%,db), while some of the cereals exhibited increase in the value of SF (%,db). There was no change in the β-glucan value of some particular cereals grown either by organic or conventional farming. Positive and negative associations between average values of analysed nutrients, TDF, ISF and SF and β-glucans and cereal farming type are discussed. It was pointed out the efficiency of organic farming for particular cereals in regard to examined chemical-technological traits for their improving, what is of importance for breeding programs, agronomic practice and food processing industry.

  • Special Session on "Fermented Food and Its Possible Health Consequences"
Speaker

Chair

Gabriela Riscuta

National Cancer Institute
USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Sharon Ross

National Cancer Institute
USA

Speaker
Biography:

Gabriela Riscuta MD, MS. CNS is a Program Director in the Nutritional Science Research Group at the Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute . In this position she plans, develops, directs, and coordinates extramural research programs in diet, nutrition and cancer as related to cancer prevention. At NCI, her role includes the examination of bioactive food components, i.e., as modifiers of cancer risk and tumor behavior in relation to specific genes and/or microbiome activity. She received a prestigious Merit Award in 2012 from NIH for the creation of a webinar series for physicians and researchers to understand the strength and the weakness of the evidence about the health effects of a food/bioactive food components.

Abstract:

Humans consume fermented food produced through natural fermentation since ancient times. Around 7000 BC, controlled fermentation process started to be used in order to produce alcoholic beverages from fruits, rice and honey. Among other fermented foods, today, fermented dairies containing live active bacteria are receiving an increased attention. Historically, under the action of indigenous microflora found in milk, the fermentation arose spontaneously. Today, controlled fermentation process is used to enhance taste and to increase the digestibility and shelf life of dairy products. Some fermented dairy products, have been evaluated in regard to their potential benefits in cancer prevention and. It was found that milk and dairy products contain micronutrients and bioactive constituents, which may influence cancer risk and progression. In 2007 the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research report concluded that probable it is an association between milk intake and lower risk of colorectal cancer. Two new large cohort studies, in Netherland and Sweden show possible protective effect against bladder cancer, associated with an increased intake of cultured dairy products in some populations. Efforts are made to understand the underlying mechanisms beyond these effects, the most beneficial probiotics involved in these processes and the optimal combinations between probiotics and prebiotics. Future studies need to clarify who might benefit and who may be placed at risk in relation to fermented dairy products consumption.

Speaker
Biography:

Sharon Ross is a Program Director in the Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health. Prior to joining the NCI, She has worked at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Food and Drug Administration. She has a PhD in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Maryland, College Park and a Masters of Public Health from Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health with an emphasis in Epidemiology.

Abstract:

Fermented foods and beverages are part of the traditional and economic fabric of many cultures, with the fermentation process imparting texture and flavor, providing nutritional value and other bioactive components and influencing food safety.The type of microorganisms used in a fermentation process influence the outcome of the fermented product. Yeasts produce ethanol as the main fermentation product, and the main fermentation product of lactic acid bacteria is lactic acid. Fermentation by yeast is primarily an anaerobic process converting sugars, such as glucose, to other compounds like ethanol, while producing energy for the microorganism. Fermented beverages include those that utilize grains (beer, rice wine, maize-based beverages), fruit (wine), tea (kombucha), and milk products (fermented mare’s milk, kefir). This talk will focus on the yeast fermented beverageswine and beer, including their processing, compositionand consumption, as well as biological roles in health and disease. The consumption of wine and beer has been associated with both healthy and harmful effects. Studies concerning the “French paradox” and adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern suggest benefit from consuming wine. Wine has a complex composition, depending on whether it is red or white as well as the variety of grape used in fermentation. Interestingly, it has recently been speculated that grape-derived microbiota may influence wine quality or terroir. Alcohol and phenolic compounds, i.e., resveratrol, have been associated with health effects of wine consumption, including cardiovascular disease risk reduction. Evidence also suggests that yeast fermentation of grapes and the resulting alcohol contribute to the increased bioavailability of resveratrol compared to the same amount of resveratrol from grape juice. Beer is rich in nutrient as well as non-nutrient components, including carbohydrates, amino acids, minerals, vitamins, and phenolic compounds. Beer and wine both contain phenolic compounds, but the specific phenolic compounds are different because the barley and hops used in the production of beer contain phenolic compounds different from those in grapes used in the production of wine. For example, Xanthohumol, the most abundant flavonoid in hops, is used as a preservative and to add bitterness and flavor to beer. Xanthohumol has several putative biological properties, including anti-inflammatory and oxidative stress modulation. Evidence to support the health benefits of moderate consumption (defined as 1 alcohol drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men) of either wine or beer or wine over beer has not been conclusive. Food scientists are currently employing techniques to increase the production of phenolic compounds during beverage fermentation, while nutrition scientists are describing the potential biological effects from consumption of beer and wine

Speaker
Biography:

Meredith A J Hullar has completed her PhD from Harvard University and Post-Doctoral studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering at University of Washington. She is currently a Senior Staff Scientist in the Cancer Prevention Department in the Division of Public Health Sciences at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Her research focuses on the role of the human microbiome in human health as influenced by the microbial metabolism of diet.

Abstract:

Fermentation has been used as a method of meat preservation in many cultures. Fermentation of meat and fish results in hydrolyzation of proteins making them more digestible, altering the composition which aids in use of indigestible components, and in some cases, acting as a source of beneficial bacteria introduced during the fermentation process. The addition of salts, nitrite, or nitrate influences the preservation process partially through altering the microbial community involved in fermentation. A recent review of the epidemologic literature shows convincing evidence for a positive association between processed meat and colorectal cancer; and probable association for salted/fermented fish and nasopharyngeal cancer. Molecular approaches, that do not rely on culturing bacteria, have shown that the composition and alpha and beta diversity of the microbiome changes in relation to meat consumption. Curing agents, as well as, hydrolized protein can be metabolized by human gut bacteria to compounds that are associated with increased risk of disease. N-nitroso compounds (NOC), which are carcinogens, are formed endogenously from nitrate and nitrite used in the curing process. Upon ingestion of fermented meat products, hydrolyzed proteins are metabolized to polyamines putrescine, tyramine, histamine, and cadaverine in the human gut. Putrescine, tyramine, and cadaverine have been shown to potentiate histamine toxicity. Microbial metabolism of sulfur amino acids and sulfated sugars found in fermented meat products are metabolized by human gut bacteria to hydrogen sulfide which may be genotoxic. These studies suggest that gut microbial metabolism of fermented meats may influence human disease risk.

Pamela E Starke-Reed

United Stated Department of Agriculture
USA

Title: Fermented vegetable: Health implication
Speaker
Biography:

Pamela E Starke-Reed is the Deputy Administrator for Nutrition, Food Safely and Product Quality Agriculture Research Service, USDA. Prior to that, she had 26 years career at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), most recently 12 years as Deputy Director of the Division of Nutrition Research Coordination. Her previous positions include 10 years with the NIH National Institute on Aging as Director of the Office of Nutrition and Program Director for the Nutrition and Metabolism and Protein Structure and Function research Programs; Biologist with the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and Assistant Professor with the Department of Medicine of George Washington University (GWU) in Washington DC. She is currently Co-Executive Secretary of the Federal Government Interagency Committee on Human Nutrition Research (ICHNR). She serves as an Associate Editor of Nutrition reviews and on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry.

Abstract:

Fermented foods contribute to about one-third of the diet worldwide and cereals are particularly important substrates for fermented foods around the globe. Fermentation of cereals, fruits and vegetables, can make otherwise inedible food stuffs safe, nutritious, and palatable. From Korean kimchi and Indian chutneys to sauerkraut, yogurt and cheese, global cultures have crafted unique flavors and traditions around fermentation for thousands of years. Fermentation is the ‘slow decomposition process of organic substances induced by micro-organisms or enzymes, of plant or animal origin’, and the changes caused by fermentation can be both advantageous and disadvantageous. Fermentation in food processing and bio-preservation is essentially the conversion of carbohydrates to alcohols and carbon dioxide or organic acids using primarily yeast or bacterial organisms. Fermentation is also employed in preservation techniques to create lactic acid in sour foods such as sauerkraut, yogurt, or vinegar. Fermented foods, as a group, are highly nutritious and digestible. Fermentation pre-digests foods, making nutrients more bio-available, and in many cases fermentation generates additional nutrients or removes anti-nutrients or toxins. Most research focuses on fermented dairy products. However, vegetables such as cabbages, carrots, garlic, soybeans, olives, cucumbers, onions, turnips, radishes, cauliflower and peppers, in addition to fruits such as lemons or berries, are fermenting probiotic foods. Lactic acid fermentation, or lacto-fermentation, is an anaerobic process where lactic acid bacteria, mainly Lactobacillus species, convert sugar into lactic acid, which acts as a preservative. This process preserves the food, creates beneficial enzymes, B-vitamins, Omega-3 fatty acids, and probiotic bacterial strains. Several health benefits have been associated with intake of fermented vegetables such as a reduction in hypertension and serum cholesterol levels, enhanced immune and gastrointestinal function as well as a lowering of the risk of colon cancer. Probiotic foods with live lactic-acid-producing bacteria intact are receiving increasing attention by consumers because of their suggested benefits to digestive health, immune function, and general well-being

Break: 11:15-11:30
Speaker
Biography:

Thomas T.Y. Wang received his Ph.D. from University of California, Davis and conducted postdoctoral studies at Purdue University. He is currently serving as Research Leader (RL) in the Diet, Genomics, and Immunology Laboratory (DGIL), Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC), Beltsville, MD. He has published more than 80 papers in peer-review journals and serving as editorial board member of journals.

Abstract:

Fermented food has existed since the dawn of human civilization and in many cultures worldwide. There are a wide variety of food materials used for fermented food including milk, legumes, fruit and vegetables. More importantly, several health-promoting properties often ascribed to fermented foods include the prevention of cancers and cardiovascular disease. As with other health promoting foods, the precise components and mechanisms by which fermented food promotes health remain elusive. Existing literature suggests that the mechanisms by which fermented food exerts its health- promoting effects may be complex and multiple cellular pathways may be associated with their health-promoting effects. Some effects may include: modulation of gut microbiomes, inflammation, hormone and cytokines pathways, and xenobiotic metabolism pathways. Also, regulation can be through genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms. Additionally, individual differences may influence health-promoting efficacies of fermented foods. Future research should include dissecting specific active components, identifying specific mechanisms and identifying whom will benefit.

  • Symposium on "Illusions, misperceptions and false food preferences caused by the brain"
Speaker
Biography:

Michael O'Mahony is Professor and Sensory Scientist in the Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis. A very entertaining and informative lecturer, he is well known for his approach to communicating new concepts to broad audiences. He has published over 100 journal articles in Sensory Science and is the author of Sensory Evaluation of Food: Statistical Methods and Procedures. He consults extensively with consumer products companies globally. He holds a Ph.D. in Chemistry and Psychology from Bristol University, United Kingdom. Topics of interest like bias in fine discriminations between similar foods, bias when estimating the strength or liking for food flavors, vanishing tastes and smells, inventing a language for flavor, solving the problem of false preferences and designing a food that people will like, even though it doesn’t yet exist.

Abstract:

The paired preference test would seem to be a simple test. Two foods are presented to a consumer, who tastes them and reports which one is preferred or whether there is no preference. It would seem simple except that if two identical foods are presented, 60-80% of consumers report they have a preference, a false preference. This tendency to give false preferences can greatly distort measurements of consumer acceptance. Why does this happen? The answer lies in the organization of information processing in the brain. The central processor is required to process massive amounts of information, just to be able to see. Because of this it uses various strategies to protect itself from information overload. The brain is very selective with the input to which it pays attention. Some of the things our eyes see can be missed completely. If the sensory input to the brain is completely constant and providing no new information, the brain simply desensitizes itself to that input. Things can vanish completely. These effects will be demonstrated in detail in the lecture, giving an entertaining set of illusions, misperceptions and strange visual effects. We only perceive what the brain decides we should perceive. Yet, it is here that the answer to the false preference problem can be solved. To protect the central information processor, a lot of behaviors become over learned and automated. They can be visualized as being relegated to an information processing subroutine.This appears to be happening with a paired preference testing. Using disruption techniques, the information processing can be restored to the central processor and false preferences eliminated.

  • Workshop on "Folic acid (B9) fortification strategies by innovative microencapsulation"

Session Introduction

Ozlem Tokusoglu

Celal Bayar University
Turkey

Title: Folic acid (B9) fortification strategies by innovative microencapsulation
Speaker
Biography:

Ozlem Tokusoglu is currently working as Associate Professor faculty member in Celal Bayar University Engineering Faculty Department of Food Engineering. She performed a visiting scholar at the Food Science and Nutrition Department /University of Florida, Gainesville-Florida-USA during 1999-2000 and as visiting Professor at the School of Food Science, Washington State University, and Pullman, Washington, USA during April-May 2010. She organized and directed as Conference Chair the International Congress entitled ANPFT2012 (Advanced Non-thermal Processing in Food Technology: Effects on Quality and Shelf-Life of Food and Beverages in May, 2012 at Turkey. She has published many papers in peer reviewed journals and serving as an editorial board member of International Journal of Food Science and Technology by Wiley Publisher, USA and Polish Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences (PJFNS) in Thomson Reuters. She published the scientific edited two book entitled Fruit and Cereal Bio-actives: Chemistry, Sources and Applications by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis, USA Publisher and entitled Improved Food Quality with Novel Food Processing by CRC Press, third book Food By-Product Based Functional Food Powders is also in progress

Abstract:

Folic acid is essential for a healthy fetal development, aids in periods of rapid cell division and growth during pregnancy and throughout infancy. Folic acid is a general term for vitamine B9 that includes food folate and folic acid that is used in supplements and food fortification. In the current study, double emulsions was used for protecting the 1-5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid (L-5-MTHF) with or without sodium ascorbate (ASC) from degradation throughout the baking and storage of a fortified wheat bread using microencapsulation using white egg powder (WEP) as the coating agent; there is no research in literature on two-step homogenization method for preparation of double emulsions. In the system, prehomogenization and following ultrasonication applications were used. With the fortification of 1-5-methyltetrahydrofolic-WEP or 1-5-methyltetrahydrofolic-WEP-ASC into wheat bread, the recoveries were found as 89.6±2.1% and 92.2±1.5% (n=6) respectively based on the HPLC. Two-step homogenization and WEP coated 1-5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid stability was preserved, significantly (p<0.05) during storage at 25o C compared to the free 1-5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid. WEP was an effective microencapsulated agent and double emulsion technique was the great condition for 1-5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid stability in baked wheat bread.

Break: 13:15-13:50
  • Track 4: Nutrition and Nutritional Management
    Track 5: Food and Public Health
Speaker

Chair

Osama O. Ibrahim

Bioinnovation
USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

A J van der Goot

Wageningen University
Netherlands

Session Introduction

A J van der Goot

Wageningen University
Netherlands

Title: Towards development of plant-based alternatives for animal products
Speaker
Biography:

A J van der Goot is Associate Professor of Food Process Engineering at Wageningen University

Abstract:

The use of plant proteins instead of proteins from animal origin is a promising route to make food production more sustainable. Replacement of animal protein by plant proteins is not trivial because animal-based products like meat and cheese are highly appreciated by consumers due to their unique sensory properties. From consumer research, it became clear that consumers appreciate alternative products most, when those resemble the original products as much as possible. We therefore investigate how to make fibrous products using plant materials as an alternative for meat. The concept of shear-induced structuring turned out to be a new route to make highly fibrous materials. The exact properties of the materials are determined by a combination of process conditions (temperature, time and deformation rate) and the functional properties of the raw materials. To obtain suitable raw materials, plant materials have to be refined due to their high carbohydrate content. The way how those are removed determine the functional properties and their structuring potential greatly. We therefore also investigate how functional protein-rich materials can be obtained from legumes/plants in a sustainable manner. Nowadays, fractionation of plant proteins is usually done with wet fractionation processes in which proteins and carbohydrates are separated based on solubility characteristics. Traditionally, refining plant proteins focuses on high protein yields and high protein purity. But, functionality may be negatively influenced by the focus on protein yield and purity. Besides, the purity of each fraction will be higher at the expense of yield, leading to less efficient use of raw material. A less intensive separation will preserve the natural structure of the plant leading to enhanced properties. In addition, a reduction in the use of chemicals, water and energy for refining is expected which contributes to a more sustainable fractionation process. In case of soy, we demonstrate a certain amount of carbohydrate have a positive effect on the final structure of the material obtained. Here, complete purification of soy protein is not the best route towards the production of high quality meat alternatives. Both from sustainability and well as final product quality, the focus in fractionation of plant materials should therefore be on functionality rather than purity

Speaker
Biography:

Henryk Zieliński is the Head of Department of Chemistry and Biodynamics of Food at IAR&FR PAS. He has completed MSc in chemistry from Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, PhD in Biochemistry from University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Professor in Food Technology and Nutrition from Polish Academy of Sciences and Postdoctoral studies from Rayne Institute, UMDS London and King’s College London. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editor-In-Chief of Polish Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences. He is Polish delegate to Food Chemistry Division at EuCheMS.

Abstract:

The functional properties of traditional and novel innovative buckwheat enhanced wheat and rye products have received increasing attention due to the suggested reduction of total mortality, coronary heart disease mortality, diabetes and cancer incidence in humans. The potential non-pharmacologic prevention of buckwheat enhanced bakery products against formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) due to the presence of quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (rutin)-the main buckwheat flavonoid was addressed in this study. AGEs are a complex group of compounds formed in a non-enzymatic way when reducing sugars react with amino acids of proteins and other molecules. Protein glycation in human is believed to be implicated in the development of chronic degenerative diseases. Recently, the protective effect of rutin, the main buckwheat flavonoid and its metabolites has been shown in diabetic rats against formation of AGEs. In this study the inhibitory activity of aqueous alcohol extracts of traditional and novel innovative buckwheat enhanced wheat and rye products against AGEs formation was studied in a bovine serum albumin (BSA)/glucose and BSA/methylglyoxal (MGO) systems whereas amino guanidine (AG), a commonly used inhibitor of glycation process has served as a reference compound. The studies showed a high inhibitory effects of buckwheat enhanced wheat breads, formulated on dark wheat flour and flour from roasted buckwheat groats against AGEs formation offer a potential therapeutic approach for the disease prevention. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of extracts from rye-buckwheat ginger cakes supplemented with low and high rutin dosages was confirmed. The results of the inhibitory activity were highly correlated in two applied model systems.

Speaker
Biography:

Osama Ibrahim is a highly experienced, principal research scientist with particular expertise in the field of microbiology, molecular biology, food safety, and bio-processing for both pharmaceutical and food ingredients. He is knowledgeable in microbial screening /culture improvement; molecular biology and fermentation research for antibiotics, enzymes, therapeutic proteins, organic acids, food flavors, biochemistry for metabolic pathways and enzymes kinetics, enzymes immobilization, bio-conversion, and analytical biochemistry. He was external research liaison for Kraft Foods with Universities for research projects related to molecular biology and microbial screening and holds three bioprocessing patents. In January 2005, he accepted an early retirement offer from Kraft Foods and in the same year he formed his own biotechnology company providing technical and marketing consultation for new start up biotechnology and food companies.

Abstract:

Prebiotics are the fermentable, non-digestible carbohydrates that stimulate as nutrients the growth and the activity of beneficial bacteria (probiotics) in the digestive system. There are two prebiotics categories: Prebiotics fibers that are naturally occurred in whole grain, broccoli, asparagus, radish, cabbage, etc, and Prebiotics oligosaccharides such as Fracto-oligosaccharide (FOX), Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), Xylo-oligisaccharides (XOS), polydextrine etc. These prebiotics oligosaccharides are increasingly added to foods for their health benefits and are not labeled as fibers in the United States. Prebiotics oligosaccharides are synthetically manufactured or extracted from plants in pure forms. Probiotics are the beneficial bacteria in the colon such as Befidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria. These probiotics bacteria assist in the maintenance of the natural balance of micro flora in the digestive system to reduce the effect of the harmful and pathogenic bacteria in the digestive system, suggesting that these probiotics bacteria can prevent gastrointestinal tract from infection diseases and reduce gut inflammation. It is also, assumed that probiotics bacteria strengthen the immune system. Synbiotics are products that contain both prebiotics and probiotics. These products have the non-digestible carbohydrates source (prebiotics) and the good bacteria (probiotics) Manufacturing of the major prebiotics oligosaccharides and the impact of synbiotics on gut health will be highlighted in this presentation.

Speaker
Biography:

Arnljotur Bjarki Bergsson completed his Master of Science in Food Science and Technology from Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology. He is currently the Director of Resources and Products division in Matis since 2010, responsible for the company’s close collaboration with the Icelandic fish and seafood processing industry. His division is currently involved in half of the projects in the Nordic Marine Innovation 2.0 Program funded by the Nordic Innovation. He has been COB of The Icelandic Fisheries Science Society since 2002. He was COB of the biotechnology company IceProtein Inc. in 2009-2013.

Abstract:

The seafood industry is the most important industry in Iceland. Sustainable utilization of marine resources is important. Focus on systemic value creation and development in Icelandic sea food industry is high. Managing catch sustainably, eliminating discards and improving utilization of the catch leads to better use of our limited resources. Implementing scientifically founded management systems for fisheries and by further developing production processes with food technology has opened new export channels. Improved production processes include a holistic value chain approach, where the raw material is handled properly from catch to consumer, and by applying biotechnology to extract the different compounds of seafood. Such compounds can be used for various applications, such as ingredients for food supplements, medical products and cosmetics. While tackling the challenges of the bioeconomy and food security, great opportunities are to be found in the marine environment in both vast amount of biomass to be found in the ocean, and the positive health impact of seafood shown in numerous studies that may counteract increasing pressure on already struggling health care systems.

Speaker
Biography:

Michael Nikolaou acquired his BSc (Hons) in Molecular Biology & Genetics of DUTH, Alexandroupolis, Greece in 2011 and his MSc in Food Science and Nutrition of University of Leeds in 2012. Being an expert in functional foods, pro-/pre-/symbiotics, he has been the Head of BioFood Tech Unit at CorinGreen SA from the end of 2013, where he developed new symbiotic products, edible cosmetics and functional lyophilized powders. From the end of 2014, he is the Quality Assurance & Control Manager of Aggelakis SA, where he assures through ISO 9001, ISO 22000 and FSSC 22000 the high quality and the safety of the produced chicken-based products with the target of the company insertion into the international markets.

Abstract:

Nowadays, a decrease in blood selenium levels in the UK and other European countries has raised great interest about possible health implications especially regarding cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, the increase of blood LDL cholesterol has been associated with the modern way of life which is strongly related to consumption of foods with high levels of saturated fats. Therefore, Aggelakis S A has developed a method of producing high quality chicken with high levels of organic selenium and oleic acid. Starting from the poultry growth, the company has changed the usual vegetable chicken feed program and it has turned it into an enriched one, consisted of naturally grown grains, fortified with 2.2% w/w olive oil and 0.02% w/w organic selenium. Using Cobb and Ross broilers and starting this fortified program on the 28th day of their growth, Aggelakis SA achieves to grow poultry which 44% of their rearing and 50% of their body mass is strongly associated with this poultry feed program. In the end of the growth period, functional chickens are produced with average net weight of 1.85 kg, when its fortified feed for 18 days weighs about 2.78 kg, the 59% of their total feed. The final result shows a substantial nutritional value because 100 gr of chicken meat is consisted of 7 gr fats, 40.3% oleic acid (of total fats) and 33 mg (60% of RDA) organic selenium when a conventional chicken is comprised with at least 14 gr fats per 100 gr of chicken meat, 39.3 % oleic acid (of total fats) and 16 mg of organic selenium. A product like OliV Chicken is a functional food which is able to protect people against selenium deficiency, cancer appearance and cardiovascular diseases.

Speaker
Biography:

Mecit Halil Oztop is a Faculty Member in the Department of Food Engineering at Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara Turkey. His current research includes application of MRI/NMR relaxometry in food science and designing active packaging systems. He received his PhD degree from University of California, Davis Biological Systems Engineering on 2012 nd started to work as faculty at METU right after.

Abstract:

Reaction monitoring is usually achieved by high-resolution spectrometric and chromatographic techniques such as GC-MS, NMR and Raman Spectroscopy. These instruments are designed such that continuous monitoring of products and reactant in a reaction is not possible. Low-Resolution NMR systems provide easy designs to implement a continuous reaction system to the instrument. NMR is a non-invasive and non-destructive method that takes signal from whole sample and enables to evaluate signals from different compartments with varying proton environments. T2 NMR Relaxometry is based on measuring spin-spin relaxation signal (CPMG) and then decomposing the signal through a mathematical transformation known as Non Negative Least Square. In this study, NMR Relaxometry monitored acid hydrolysis of sucrose through T2-CPMG experiments. The acid hydrolysis experiments were designed to develop an accurate and quick repeatable method for the concentration determination of the hydrolysis product. Acid hydrolysis of sucrose was studied at different concentrations of sucrose (10%, 15% and 20% w/w). pH 2.5, HCl solution was used at 30o C as the hydrolysis media. T2 relaxation times of the solutions were measured at pre-determined time intervals. Reducing sugar concentration was determined by the DNS (3, 5-dinitrosalicylic acid). 2 T2 peaks were detected based on NMR Relaxometry results. The T2 values of peaks showed significanthigh correlations (p<0.05) with the reducing sugar content. However, for different concentrations of sucrose different peaks of T2 gave better results

Speaker
Biography:

Tarek M. Madkour has completed his PhD on 1992 from University of Cincinnati, OHIO and postdoctoral studies from the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium. He was awarded the Fulbright Fellowship award, the state of Egypt award, the Polymer Society of Japan award and the Showman foundation award. He has published more than 70 papers in reputed journals, delivered more than 20international conferencepresentations and supervised more than 15 PhD and MSc theses.

Abstract:

Biodegradable-biorenewable polymers may provide an excellent alternative to petroleum-based polymers but their poor mechanical, thermal and barrier performance may form an obstacle to their full utilization as food packaging materials. In the current work, bionanocomposites were prepared with various nanofiller particles in order to improve their overall performance as food packaging and storage materials. Both the biopolymeric matrix and the reinforcement agents are based on natural renewable materials name lypoly(lactic acid) (PLA) and functionalized and non-functionalized carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets, respectively. Use of the bionanocomposites comes with the advantage of sustainable development from shifting the dependency of using the limited supply of fossil fuel resources for the production of the packaging materials to using renewable natural resources for the production of biodegradable materials that can break down easily and diffuses naturally back into the environment. The addition of nano-sized fillers has efficiently improved the mechanical and barrier properties of the materials provided that the nanofiller particles are well dispersed into the matrix. It was observed that the incorporation of functionalized nanofillers into the PLA matrix enhanced its rate of degradation and hence markedly decreased the thermal stability of the resulting nanocomposites.Control of the thermal degradation of the biopolymer nanocomposites was also achieved by controlling the amount and type of the nanofillers. Good quality bionanocomposite films with low porosity and well dispersed nanofiller particles were obtained as indicated from the scanning electron microscopy micrographs.

Break: 16:10-16:25
Speaker
Biography:

Hector Eduardo Martinez Flores completed his PhD at the age of 31 years (1997) in the CINVESTAV-IPN Institution, Mexico. He undertook Postdoctoral studies in the Universidade Estadual of Campinas, Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil from 1997 to 2000. He was Visiting Professor at Washington State University from 2013 to 2014. He has published 37 papers in reputed scientific journals and has been and is serving as Reviewer of 18 JCR journals.

Abstract:

A freeze-dried yogurt made with skim milk, inulin, vegetable oil and Saccharomyces boulardii was developed. To prevent fermentation of carbohydrates, probiotic yeast was encapsulated. Some physicochemical properties, sensory evaluation and viability of the encapsulated yeast were measured in the lyophilized yogurt. Yogurt had excellent rehydration properties, panelists agreed lyophilized yogurt, although a slight graininess was detected in the product. Relative to the viability of S. boulardii, the initial value of the colony forming units (CFU) was 6.55 log CFU/g. After 21 days of storage, the value was 4.4 log CFU/g. The initial count of lactic acid bacteria was 8.06 log CFU/g and after 21 days storage the value was 7.57 log CFU/g. The presence of S. boulardii was detected in colon and feces of Wistar rats previously treated with ampicillin and then fed yogurt. The conclusion is that the yogurt meets the characteristics of being a functional food.

Speaker
Biography:

Camille S Bowen-Forbes completed her PhD in 2006 from The University of the West Indies and Postdoctoral studies from the Bioactive Natural Products and Phytoceuticals Laboratory, Michigan State University. She is a Lecturer at UWI and has published her work in reputed science journals. Two of her publications received institutional awards for best research publication.

Abstract:

Although Jamaica is a highly fruitful country, many of its fruit species are unknown by the masses resulting in their exclusion from the diet and their non-exploitation with respect to cultivation and use in research and food and nutraceutical product development. The goal of our research therefore is to conduct research on uncommon Jamaican plant species including fruits, aimed at investigating their health-beneficial properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic and anticancer properties. This is done with a view of promoting productive utilization of the island’s plant resources. Studies have been done on four berries species from the Rubus genus (R. rosifolius, R. racemosus, R. ellipticus and R. jamaicensis, three raspberry and one blackberry species respectively). Our results revealed that the Jamaican berries possess high antioxidant activities and levels of anthocyanins comparable to those found in similar commercial varieties sold worldwide. Extracts of the Jamaican berries demonstrated superior anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties compared to their counterparts. Additionally, extracts and compounds from the red and yellow raspberries (respectively R. rosifolius and R. ellipticus) showed anti-proliferative activity against several cancer cell lines including colon, breast and stomach cancers. Rubus leaf extracts have demonstrated high antioxidant activity and are good sources α-linolenic acid, an essential fatty acid. Phenolics including gallic acid, 3-0-methyl catechin and epicatechin have been isolated from Rubus leaf extracts which significantly account for their antioxidant activity. These results prove that these uncommon fruit species represent a valuable natural resource which may be productively harnessed for their health-promoting properties

  • Track 7: Nutritional Deficiencies and Nutraceuticals
    Track 8: Sustainable Food Security
Speaker

Chair

Michael O’Mahony

University of California
USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Henryk Zielinski

Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research PAS
Poland

Session Introduction

Ian Watson

University of Glasgow
United Kingdom

Title: Strategies for producing food from microalgae for improved food security
Speaker
Biography:

Ian A Watson first degree was in Applied Physics followed by a PhD from the School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, in “Optimising the gaseous discharge and optical coupling of a pulsed CO2 laser”. He has extensively researched the effects of high power laser beams on microorganisms and laser sterilization and inactivation; publishing on direct effects of lasers and their efficacy on decontaminating different substrates (solids, liquids and air) and a range of microorganisms (E. coli to B. atrophaeus, an anthrax simulant). He is actively investigating microalgal growth, dewatering and extraction of biofuel and utilization of microalgae for food.

Abstract:

Microalgae offer the world a potential solution for sustainable sources of protein, carbohydrates and oils. In the face of a growing population, set to rise to 9.7 Billion by 2050, there are increasing pressures on production of protein. This is exacerbated by the increase desire of people world-wide to consume more meat where the production of livestock has a significant feed requirement. Microalgae encapsulate a combination of protein, carbohydrates and essential oils which can be used for different foods and offer a potential solution to increased food security. Various strategies for producing microalgae for food at scale will be investigated and their feasibility as a protein substitute assessed

Speaker
Biography:

Ryszard Amarowicz has completed his graduation of a Master of Science in Human Nutrition at the University of Warsaw (Poland) in 1979, followed by the attainment of a PhD at the Faculty of Agriculture of the University of Olsztyn (Poland). Since 1989, he has developed his scientific career at the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences, serving before the role of Assistant Professor (1989-2001), followed by that of Associate Professor (2001-2011) and finally Professor (2011-now) where he currently also holds the position of Head of the Department of Chemical and Physical Properties of Food. He got his scientific skills by means of numerous fellowships at leading foreign research institutes in Japan, Canada and USA

Abstract:

Phenolic acids are the main group of phenolic compounds in rapeseeds and canola seeds. Anti oxidative properties of extracts of phenolic acids from rapeseed and canola are significantly important from the nutritive and technological point of view. Examination of these properties was a subject of many publications and scientific reports. However, the information of the influence of cultivation condition on the antioxidant capacity of rapeseeds is limited. Materials of the investigation were three cultivars of rapeseed: California, Castilla and Nelson F1. The seeds were cultivated using normal (N), intensive (I) and economical (E) technology. In addition, seeds of cultivar Hybryda I was infected by Alternaria brassice. From the defatted plant material, phenolic compounds were extracted with 80% (v/v) methanol. Phenolic compounds present in the crude extracts showed antioxidant and radical scavenging properties as revealed following studies using FRAP, ABTS and DPPH methods. The content of phenolic compounds in the extracts was determined using the Folin & Ciocaltcu’s phenol reagent. The content of total phenolic in the crude extracts ranged from 48 mg/g (Castilla -I) to 61 mg/g (California-N). The weak effect of the cultivation condition on the content of total phenolics was observed for California and Nelson F1. Intensification of agricultural technology decreased the FRAP of the extracts of Nelson F1 and the antiradical properties of California against ABTS cation radical. In the case of Nelson F1 the economic method of cultivation increased the antiradical activity of the extract against DPPH radical. The infection by fungi decreased the content of total phenolics in the rapeseed extract and changed the profile of individual phenolic compounds.

Speaker
Biography:

Zafer Akan graduated from Yuzuncu Yil University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics and M.Sc. in the Yuzuncu Yil University School of Medicine, Dept. of Biophysics, and Ph.D. in the Marmara University School of Medicine Dept. of Biophysics and University of North Carolina department of Biochemistry-Biophysics NC USA at 2009. His Main research area is about Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Soft tissue, Head and Neck Cancers. Moreover, he have works about antioxidants and cancer relations. Besides involved in the editorial boards of many international scientific journal and He is also the chief editor of international journal Medical Science and Discovery.

Abstract:

The phytochemical quercetin is one of the most abundant dietary flavonoids widely present in many fruits and vegetables. Previous in vitro studies has shown that quercetin acts as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and it has potential anticarcinogenic properties as an apoptosis inducer. In this study, it was examined apoptotic effects of quercetin on the K562 erythroleukemia cell line. K562 cells were induced to undergo apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide. Cell viability and apoptosis level were assessed by annexin V and PI staining methods using flow cytometry. Viability of K562 cells was increased by low dose of quercetin (5-100 μM) for 3 hours. Meanwhile, the toxicity of high doses of quercetin utilizing was proved in the conditions of 100-500 μM, 24 hours and resulted in decreasing of K562 cell viability as expected (p<0.01). As to results, 100 μM quercetin was defined as a protective dose. Also, K562 cell apoptosis due to hydrogen peroxide was decreased in a dose dependent manner. As indicated in previous studies, reduction of superoxides by free radical scavengers like quercetin could be beneficial for prevention of cancer but consumption of such flavonoids during cancer treatment may weaken effects of chemotherapeutics and radiotherapy. Especially cancer patients should be carefully considered for traditional phytotherapy during cancer treatment, which can lead to controversial results.

Speaker
Biography:

Kinga Topolska has completed her PhD from University of Agriculture in Krakow. Her main scientific interests are functional foods and osteoporosis as well as nutritional education

Abstract:

Yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) is an Andean tuberous root that is regarded as a functional food given that it contains fructans. There are evidences that fructans-non-digestible carbohydrates enhance mineral (especially calcium) absorption and thus may play important role in the prevention of osteoporosis. The next issue is that fruit products are becoming an important part of the modern diet in many communities. Despite of fresh fruits, several types of preserves are popular. One of them are fruit sorbets. This is why the aim of our study was to assess the total Ca content in the blood serum of growing rats fed calcium-deficient diet with the addition or not sorbet containing yacon root powder as a source of fructans. Animals i.e., female Wistar rats had a free access to deionised water and the modified AIN’93 G diet containing a strawberry sorbet produced with yacon (calculated to provide 8% of fructans in rat diet). After 12 weeks of feeding the rats were euthanized. The measurements of total calcium level in serum were performed using BS 120 analyzer. The results demonstrated the Ca concentration in rat serum was decreased after consuming of sorbets containing yacon as compared to the control group, however the changes were not statistically significant. Further studies are needed to assess the potential of fructans from yacon as the ingredients for functional food, what is especially important for those population groups where the calcium consumption is insufficient.

Speaker
Biography:

Victoria O. Adetunji is Senior Lecturer at University of Ibadan

Abstract:

Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogen of serious concern in the food industry. Biofilm formation by this pathogen enables persistence in the food processing environment. This study assessed the abilities of some food and disease outbreak strains of Listeria monocytogenes to form biofilms and tested the effect of various glucose and sucrose concentrations over some incubation periods. Biofilms were developed in polystyrene tissue culture plates by 4 food isolates and 4 disease outbreak isolates of L. monocytogenes strains in tryptic soy broth (TSB) with 3 different concentrations (0, 2% and 4%) of glucose or sucrose at 37oC during a period of 24 to 120 h. The biofilms formed were quantified using the crystal violet binding assay. The influence of glucose, sucrose and incubation time on biofilm formation was tested for significance at p<0.05 using the univariate analysis of variance on Statistical Analysis Software (SAS). Both sugar inhibited biofilms masses of Listeria monocytogenes strains tested. Significantly (p<0.05) high levels of Listeria monocytogenes biofilm reduction were observed with the use of sucrose than glucose and at increased sugar concentrations. Both sugars have very strong effects against biofilm masses of Listeria monocytogenes strains H8738, H8506, H7962 and 7869 than other strains. This study concludes that the use of sugars could pave a way for effective control of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms in the food industry.

  • Young Research forum

Session Introduction

Laura H G Van Donkelaar

Wageningen University
Netherlands

Title: Dry fractionation in barley processing
Speaker
Biography:

Laura H G Van Donkelaar has completed her Masters degree in sustainable process engineering at the age of 23 years from Wageningen University. Currently, she is working as a PhD in the Food Process Engineering Group at the same university. She works on the optimization of the use of agricultural materials and focusing on barley.

Abstract:

Wet processing is often used to alter the composition of natural materials. Wet processing requires copious amounts of water, energy and chemicals while focus is mostly on pure ingredients. However, for many applications complete purity is not necessary and sometimes even counterproductive. Dry fractionation is an interesting method to alter the composition of raw materials slightly. The big advantage of dry fractionation is that no water and chemicals are needed while the absence of a drying process reduces the energy consumption considerably. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the potential of a specific dry fractionation step (i.e. pearling) as a new route to alter the composition. Besides, the effect on functional properties will be given having the main application, the beer brewing process in mind. Pearling is an abrasive method to remove the outer layers of the barley kernels. It has been shown to reduce the content of insoluble fibre, ash, protein and polyphenols. Removing the outer 5% of the kernel for example results in a 15% reduction of insoluble arabin oxylans, 23% of the insoluble fibre content and 25% of the water holding capacity of the non-starch components. It also reduces the ash content by 19% and the polyphenol content by 11% while only 0.20% of the starch is pearled off. A relation was found between the insoluble fibre content and the water holding capacity of a fraction. Lower fibre content reduces the water holding capacity and as a result the volume of the spent grains which implies that less worth and sugar are lost during filtration

Speaker
Biography:

Xiaoguo Ying graduated from Zhejiang Ocean University in 2014 with a master degree in food science and technology. Thereafter he stared his PhD studies at the University of Pisa, Italy where he currently works for the Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment (DAFE). His work is focused on food technology. In this field, he has major expertise on wine storage.

Abstract:

The post-bottling period is critical in the wine value chain, since once the wine is bottled there are no further possibilities to control any compositional deviation. Even though the rate of biochemical changes during post-bottling storage slows down, some biochemical reactions and wine sensory changes in color, aroma or in-mouth properties occur during the storage process to some extent. Despite being aware of the importance of both the stage of ageing in the bottle and the initial composition of the wine in the evolution of its sensory properties, the current studies separately showed the effect of storage conditions or packaging type on wine conservation. However, no study so far looked at the combined effects of both factors. To this end, the present work has evaluated the evolution of sensorial and physicochemical characteristics of some types of wines (White, short maceration red wine, aged red wine) in different storage conditions comprehensively. All these sensory attributes were correlated in a principal component analysis (PCA) combined with physicochemical index for more intuitive understanding of overall change in the different post-bottling conditions.

Break: 16:20-16:35
Speaker
Biography:

Vasilisa Pedan studied Food Chemistry at the Technical University of Berlin in Germany and is currently doing her PhD at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences in Switzerland since 09/2012. Her field of research is the determination of changes of the polyphenol content during the chocolate manufacturing process.

Abstract:

Monomer cocoa polyphenols can be measured easily by RP-HPLC whereby more and more studies use NP-HPLC for evaluating the distribution of the oligomeric polyphenols. From conventional photometrical cuvette measurements it is known that the portion of condensed polyphenols in cocoa is much higher than that of monomer polyphenols. Due to the lack of reliable methods, it is difficult to predict the antioxidant capacity of single higher molecular polyphenols quickly. As presented recently, the antioxidant activity of condensed cocoa polyphenols can be measured simultaneously using an online NP-HPLC-DPPH assay. The question arises how condensed polyphenols are altered during different chocolate manufacturing stages and with them their antioxidant capacity. The online NP-HPLC-DPPH assay was applied to separate the homologous series of condensed polyphenols and simultaneously assess their antioxidant capacity in relation to their degree of polymerisation (DP) during a chocolate manufacturing on a lab process. This study shows that an unroasted cocoa extract contains condensed polyphenols with a DP of up to 13 monomer (-)-epicatechin units. It could be shown that changes in the profile of condensed polyphenol resulting from the chocolate process have an impact on their antioxidant capacity. From unroasted cocoa beans to the ready-to-eat chocolate, the maximum DP changes from 13 monomer units to 11 monomer units. The most prominent shift was observed during the drying process. In addition, it is clarified that during a four hours conching of cocoa mass the amount of condensed polyphenols changes just slightly and therefore also only marginally their antioxidant capacity. It could be shown that unroasted cocoa extract contains the highest amount of extractable condensed polyphenols and displays the most powerful antioxidant

Speaker
Biography:

Sevil Cikrikci has completed her both BS and MS Degree at Middle East Technical University Food Engineering Department. Currently, she has been studying PhD at METU and she is also a research assistant

Abstract:

Oil migration is a common problem in chocolate confectionery products leading to quality defects, particularly fat bloom. Although there are so many methods to monitor and quantify migration, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is among the most novel technique as being a non-destructive method. The main objective of this study was to quantify oil migration from two different hazelnut pastes (oil percentage as 44% and 38.4%) and one hazelnut cream (oil percentage as 30%) products into one type of dark chocolate layer system stored at 30 °C. For this purpose, signal intensity (SI) values of chocolate layers containing migrated oil through hazelnut layers were obtained by using MRI. 2D MR images of samples were acquired in the study. MRI measurement was performed using a turbo spin echo sequence (TSE) with a TR of 800 ms and TE of 13 ms with a 3T system (SIEMENS MAGNETOM Trio, Germany). A single layer of each hazelnut formulation and a single layer of dark chocolate were prepared and analyzed. SI values were obtained as 102.94, 92.96 and 101.9 for two layer systems of hazelnut paste with high oil content (HO), low oil content (LO) and hazelnut cream (HC) samples, respectively. The highest SI value among single layer samples was found in single layer of HO sample as 366.27 and the lowest SI result was obtained in single chocolate layer as 57.61. It was shown that MRI has the potential to differentiate different confectionary fillings/coatings based on their migration rates in chocolate systems.

Speaker
Biography:

Van Tang Nguyen obtained Engineer degree in Food Technology from HaNoi University of Science and Technology. He then received Master degree in Food Science from National Taiwan Ocean University, and has been doing his PhD in Food Science at University of Newcastle, Australia. Van Tang Nguyen is working as a Lecturer in Food Science and Technology at NhaTrang University and Casual Academic in Food Science at University of Newcastle. His research has focused on natural bioactive compounds, pharmacological activity, and functional foods.He published 12 research papers and 3 books in the field of Food Science and Technology.

Abstract:

Drying methods, solvents and extraction methods greatly affect the phytochemical compounds and biological activity from plant materials. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of different drying methods, various solvents and extraction methods on the phytochemical compounds and antioxidant capacity from Xao tam phan (Paramignya trimera) root obtained from Vietnam. The results showed that microwave drying was an effective method in removal of water in terms of shortest drying time, lowest energy consumption and greatest retention of phytochemical compounds and antioxidant capacity from the P. trimera root while methanol and microwave-assisted extraction were the best solvent and method for greatest extraction of the phytochemical compounds and antioxidant capacity from the P. trimera root. The findings from this study allow retaining the highest levels of phytochemical compounds and antioxidant capacity from the P. trimera root for potential application in the nutraceutical industry.

Speaker
Biography:

Mehrdad Mirzaee has completed his BSc in Horticulture at Tabriz University in 1994 and worked as greenhouse producer and consultant for more than 10 years in Iran. In 2007 he moved to the UK and continued his studies in MSc and PhD in postharvest and Natural resources in university of Essex and university of Greenwich. He started his job as technical and business development manager at Landseer Ltd (AgroFresh agent in the UK) since 2008. He combined his academic and work experience in commercial sectors for conducting many applicable research projects for industry related to crop production and postharvest technology.

Abstract:

Maintaining the quality of fresh produce is not only important during postharvest handling for fresh market, but also has an important impact on the quality of processed products. Growers applied chemical compounds like calcium salts as pre-harvest and postharvest treatments for maintaining texture of fresh produce for a long time. Also delaying maturation after harvest through controlled atmosphere storage and application of 1-MCP (SmartFreshTM) as an inhibitor of ethylene perception revolutionized storage life of fresh produce. This helped food industry to have access to fresh produce for a longer time. For better understanding the quality changes in the fresh produce which stored for a long time and the impacts after processing, it is important to develop diagnostic methods to identify changes in minerals and nutrition. Most of the previous studies focused on total calcium concentration, while it is known that certain amount of calcium could be bound and are not active within the tissues that affect the distribution of available minerals. This study focused on identifying new diagnostic methods to have a better view about the content of available minerals during storage time and helps for a better prediction of proceeding changes of nutrition after processing in food industry. Bramley’s seedling apple as the most popular British cooking apple was studied in this research and studies on other fruit and vegetable like banana, broccoli and potato are continuing

Speaker
Biography:

Sevgin Diblan was graduated from Department of Food Engineering at Süleyman Demirel University as honor student in 2011 and then she received her master degree at the age of 24 years from Department of Food Engineering at Ankara University in 2013. Currently, she is doing her Ph.D. in the Department of Food Engineering at Gaziantep University. She has been working as a research assistant in the Department of Food Engineering at Adana Science and Technology University since 2013.

Abstract:

In this study, the effects of five different types fining agents (gelatin, bentonite, albumin, casein and chitosan) on anthocyanins (ACNs) and color of red grape juice produced from Kalecik Karasi variety (Vitis vinifera L.) were investigated. Total monomeric ACN, ACN composition, phenolic composition, polymeric color and reflectance color analyses were carried out. After clarification, the turbidity of red grape juice decreased from 28 NTU to 4.2–4.4 NTU with bentonite + albumin and bentonit + casein combinations followed by bentonite (5.7 NTU) and bentonite + gelatin (8.8 NTU). Chitosan and bentonite + chitosan combination resulted in the highest turbidity level (11 NTU). Clarification with bentonite, bentonite + casein and bentonite + albumin and albumin + gelatin did not lead to significant ACN losses. However, chitosan (38%), bentonite + chitosan (26%) and bentonite + gelatin (20%) resulted in drastic reductions in ACN contents. Four major ACNs were identified in red grape juice. HPLC analyses revaled that malvidin-3-glucoside (57%) was the major anthocyanin followed by peonidin-3-glucoside (10%), cyanidin-3-glucoside (6%) and delphinidine-3-glucoside (4%). Highest loss in phenolic content was found in samples clarified with casein and albumin (29–32%). High correlation was found between phenolic content and turbidity (r=0,9396). While casein and albumin caused most reduction in catechin, chitosan removed caffeic acid at the highest level. Clarification with casein and albumin resulted in the highest clarity among all clarification treatments and did not cause much change in color values of red grape juice. Bentonit + casein and bentonit + albumin are recommended for the clarification of red grape juice with highest clarity and lowest color loss.

Speaker
Biography:

Sumeyye Alagoz was graduated from Department of Food Engineering at Ankara University as honor student in 2011 and then she completed her M.S studies with the scholarship at the age of 25 years from Department of Food Engineering at Ankara University in 2014. She worked as a research assistant in the Department of Food Engineering at Çankırı Karatekin University for 11 months in 2014. Currently, she has been working as food engineering in Republic of Turkey Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Livestock in Food Control Laboratory Directorate, Bolu since January 2015. At the same time, she has been doing her Ph.D. in the Department of Food Engineering at Ankara University since February 2014.

Abstract:

Sun-dried apricots (SDAs) containing various sorbic acid (SA) (0, 488–530 and 982–1087 mg/kg) and moisture [intermediate (271–278 g/kg and high (341–344 g/kg)] levels were stored in the consumer-size packages with very low moisture and gas permeability at various temperatures (4–30°C) for 10 months. Changes in chemical (brown color and β-carotene) and microbiological qualities of SDAs during storage were investigated. Moisture content, SA concentration and storage temperature showed significant effect on chemical and microbiological qualities of SDAs. Removal of SA from SDAs was fitted to a first-order kinetic model (R2=0.799–0.966) and the highest SA loss was determined in SDAs stored at 30°C. Interestingly, SA oxidation protected β-carotene from oxidation; therefore, the lowest β-carotene degradation occurred in SDAs stored at 30°C. Also, increase in moisture content led to 1.3–1.9 times slower rate of brown colour formation in SDAs. On the contrary, increase in brown colour formation was found with increase in SA content. As storage temperature increased, brown colour formation increased. No spoilage was observed in SDAs with intermediate moisture content at all storage temperatures. On the contrary, SDAs containing no sorbic acid and high moisture were spoiled by mould and yeast at 20 and 30oC in a month and at 4 and 10oC in 1 to 3 months. Sorbic acid must be used for the prevention of microbial growth in SDAs with high moisture. As a result, 500 mg SA/kg is sufficient to prevent the microbial spoilage and brown color formation.

Speaker
Biography:

Ashwini is in her final year of PhD degree under the supervision of Dr.Wee Sim Choo and Prof.Gary A. Dykes at the School of Science, Monash University Malaysia. She completed her BSc (Hons) Biotechnology at AIMST University, Malaysia with a First-Class Honours and obtained her Masters in Biotechnology from Macquarie University, Australia. Her areas of research interest are mainly on the production of functional foods, application of plant secondary metabolites in food processing and to improve consumer food products.

Abstract:

The current trend in food colouring research is the discovery and use of natural food colourants to overcome the potential adverse effects of synthetic colourants. Hylocereus polyrhizus (red pitahaya) is rich in betalains, a potential source of natural red colourant. The betalain extracts from Hylocereus polyrhizus can contain up to 80% of fermentable sugars. These free sugars result in diluted colourant preparation and possible caramelization during food processing at high temperatures. Fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a simple technique to remove these free sugars and to concentrate the betalains from Hylocereus polyrhizus. This studyoptimized the fermentation conditions (temperature, duration, inoculum size and agitation speed) using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to achieve the maximum recovery of betalains. A Box-Behnken designwas performed to analyse the effects of fermentation conditions on the yield, betacyanin content (BC) andtotal sugar content of betalains. The study revealed that agitation speed had a significant influence on the yield of betalains while temperature, duration and agitation speed were the key factors for the removal of sugars from betalain extracts. The BC were significantly influenced by temperature and agitation speed. The optimized conditions obtainedwere as follows: temperature of 36°C, duration of 16.5 hr, inoculum size of 2.7% and agitation speed of 107 rpm. Under these fermentation conditions, at least 48.8% of betalains with a BC of 132.5 g kg-1and 2.57% of sugars will be recovered. These optimized fermentation conditions are useful for the production of betalains with low sugar content as potential natural red colourants for the application in the food industry.

Speaker
Biography:

Kubra ERTAN was graduated from Department of Food Engineering at Ankara University in 2012. Currently, she is doing her master degree in the Department of Food Engineering at Ankara University. She has been working as a research assistant in the Department of Food Engineering at Mehmet Akif Ersoy University, Burdur since 2013.

Abstract:

The effects of various copigment sources (gallic acid and water extracts obtained from green tea, pomegranate rind and rose petal) and various sweeteners (sucrose, honey, and maltose syrup) on anthocyanins stability were investigated in sour cherry nectars. Water extracts of green tea, pomegranate rind and rose petal were added to sour cherry nectars to form copigmentation with anthocyanins. Sour cherry nectars were then sweetened by sucrose, honey and maltose syrup. In the nectar samples, the pigment : copigment ratio was 1:10 (w/w), the pH values were 3.2–3.5 and the temperature was at 20°C. Copigmentation was measured by the shift in absorbance (hyperchromic effect, ΔAmax) and the shift in the wavelength of the maximum absorbance of the anthocyanins (bathocromic shift, Δλmax). The addition of rose petal and green tea extracts, and gallic acid led to significantly increase in ΔAmax value, while there was no significant copigmentation effect of the sweeteners (sugar, honey and maltose syrup) added. In contrast, the combination of phenolic extracts and sweeteners resulted in the increase in ΔAmax value and this significant increase clearly showed the synergistic effect for copigmentation when these two added together. The maximum copigmentation effect was observed after the addition of rose petals extract, including honey as sweetener. This addition resulted in bathocromic shift up to 4.1 nm and increase in absorbance up to % 4. Results demonstrated that gallic acid and rose petal extract had copigmentation effect and increased the stability of anthocyanins in sour cherry nectars containing various sweeteners.

Speaker
Biography:

Bhaswati Goswami is pursuing her PhD program from Indian Institute of Engineering Science & Technology (IIEST), Shibpur. Additionally she is ‘Junior Research Fellow’ from Department of Science & Technology, INSPIRE, Govt. of India. She is first rank holder and is silver medalist in Master of Science in ‘Food Processing and Nutrition Science” in Bengal Engineering & Science University, Shibpur (BESUS), W.Bengal, India. She has published one paper on “Identification and Characterization of Extracellular Red Pigment Producing Bacteria Isolated from Soil” in International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences in 2014.

Abstract:

Bioactive peptides which are specific protein fragments serve for both nutritional and medicinal purposes. These are inactive within the sequence of parent protein and release during food processing. The present research study aims on the production and utilization of bioactive peptides from protein rich natural sources which is of immense scientific interest over the past few years. In this particular study we have tried to optimize the parameters for the superior quality peptide production for better utilization in human body. Edible oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) has been selected (obtained from Vivekananda Institute of technology, Nimpith, West Bengal.) for peptide production. Primarily Protein hydrolysate was prepared enzymatically. Hydrolysis has been performed using three different enzymes (Protease k, Pepsin, Trypsin) at three different concentrations (0.05%, 0.1% and 0.15%)at three different temperatures (room temperature, 40˚C, and 50˚C)with three different time periods(60, 90 and 120 minutes)respectively. Enzyme inactivation has been done by keeping the hydrolysate in boiling water bath for 3 minutes. Degree of hydrolysis (TNBS method) ranged from 55.03% to 103.14%. Protein solubility and Protein dispersibility index (PDI) of mushroom protein hydrolysates varied from 3.26% to 4.15% & 68.12% to 79% respectively. According to the results, ‘Protease k’ has optimal activity of production of protein hydrolysate with highest degree of hydrolysis at 50- 60˚C. Thus, these hydrolysates can be formulated in diets for the betterment of protein utilization in human body and further processed for peptide production. The Spent mushroom will be processed for bioethanol production and bioremediation simultaneously