Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Food Processing & Technology London, UK.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Food Technology-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ozlem Tokusoglu photo
Biography:

Ozlem Tokusoglu has completed her PhD at Ege University Engineering Faculty, Department of Food Engineering at 2001. She worked as a research fellow/doctor assistant/ assistant professor/associate professor at Ege University and Celal Bayar University during 1993 to now. She is currently working as Associate Professor faculty member in Celal Bayar University Engineering Faculty Department of Food Engineering. She performed a visiting scholar at the Food Science and Nutrition Department /University of Florida, Gainesville-Florida-USA during 1999-2000 and as visiting Professor at the School of Food Science, Washington State University, and Pullman, Washington, USA during April-May 2010. She organized and directed as Conference Chair the International Congress entitled ANPFT2012 (Advanced Non-thermal Processing in Food Technology: Effects on Quality and Shelf-Life of Food and Beverages in May, 2012 at Turkey. She served as organizing committee member at 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Nutritional Science & Therapy Conference in July 2013 at Philadelphia, USA. She has published many papers in peer reviewed journals and serving as an editorial board member of International Journal of Food Science and Technology by Wiley Publisher, USA and Polish Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences (PJFNS) in Thomson Reuters. She published the scientific edited two book entitled Fruit and Cereal Bio-actives: Chemistry, Sources and Applications by CRC Press, Taylor & Francis, USA Publisher and entitled Improved Food Quality with Novel Food Processing by CRC Press, third book Food By-Product Based Functional Food Powders is also in progress.

Abstract:

Food Ultrasound (US) is an emerging technology and it is stated that US improve the quality of food and beverages and preserve the overall quality of foods such as improvement in microbial inactivation, mass transfer, inactivation or acceleration of enzymatic activity to enhance shelf life, assistance of thermal treatments in texture quality in facilitating the extraction of various foods/plants and enhancing of bioactive components of foods. Power US uses a lower frequency range of 20 to 100 kHz and a higher sound intensity of 10 to 1000 W/cm2 that are disruptive and induce effects on the chemical-biochemical, physical or mechanical properties of foods and can be used in preservation and safety and are applying to food enzymes in microbial inactivation in ultrasound assisted extraction. Also, US can be used for improved sensory, texture and color quality and microbial stability of plant food resources including fruit and vegetables, fruit juices, cereals, oil-based products. US can be applied for homogenization at fruit juice manufacturing. The using of an ultrasound processing during the mixing step of fruit juice manufacturing may lead to better quality juices. The utilization of high power ultrasound in the juice industry has been widely studied. To meet the FDA requirement of a 5-log reduction of micro organisms, a sonication combination with mild heat treatment and or pressure is essential. It was concluded that total mesophilic aerobes in orange juices was inhibited as 3.7 log at 485 kHz/200 W/20 min; no ultrasound-related detrimental problems was found on color properties of orange juices. The total phenolic anti oxidants, naringenin flavanone were 186.22±8.3 mg/L, 74.82±2.6 mg/L respectively by domestic squeezing whereas those were 242.30±11.4 mg/L and 97.05±5.2 mg/L by ultrasound processing at above-mentioned conditions. In current study, the non-pathogen bacteria Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris in apple and tomato fruit juices was inhibited as important levels without color problem of juices. The chocolate quality is highly dependent on tempering stage of the manufacturing process owing to tempering is critical for reducing processing failures and ensuring a quality end product. US application for cacao mix at 150 kHz/100 W/5 min gave the pleasant texture, good mold stability, stable shelf-life and good resistance to fat bloom. From the nutritional perspective, the theobromine is the primary stimulant in chocolate, and caffeine being secondary. By applying ultrasound in prepared cacao formulation, theobromine level was found as 27.54±3.65 at the same conditions and it was found the good correlation between TB level and a stringency founding’s in sensory analyses (y=3.456x+5.47; R2=0.998).The approach of ultrasound applying to assist food preparation could be of great interest to fruit juice and chocolate manufacturers for the innovative and safe food products.

Keynote Forum

Christopher Smith

Manchester Metropolitan University
UK

Keynote: The future for food technology

Time : 09:30-09:55

OMICS International Food Technology-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Christopher Smith photo
Biography:

Christopher Smith joined MMU in November 2010 as the Director of the Manchester Food Research Centre and Professor of Food Science at Hollings Faculty.Educated in Liverpool,he took his first degree in Applied Biology followed by a PhD in Chemistry at the University of Salford.He is Editor-in-Chief of Food and Agricultural Immunology and International Journal of Food Science and Technology.He has published over 100 scientific papers, many in the field of Food Science; he has provided chapters for books and spoken at over 150 scientific meetings.He has also been instrumental in organising the biannual Environment and Food Mass Spectrometry Special Interest Group meetings as well as the 2008 IFST Annual Meeting, the First International Chester Food Science and Technology Conference and the Food Nanotechnology Conference.He is currently Editor-in-Chief of Food and Agricultural Immunology Foods.

Abstract:

Food Technology is potentially the most important scientific activity. In the future the Food Industry has to consider the pressures which will present themselves as the world develops. We all know of the problems of the World; Population Growth, Climate Change, Famine and Water shortages. These issues and many others such as energy supplies, changes in dietary habits and pollution all ultimately present challenges which the food industry and particularly food technology will have to manage. Food Technology can provide options and opportunities which will assist with solving these problems. Obviously it is possible to examine each of these problems separately and attempt to solve them without consideration of the interconnected nature of these problems. Hence Food Technology needs to examine methods for feeding a larger population whilst limiting the impact on the climate using less energy producing less waste and utilizing the products of basic production in better and more relevant ways. In this conference, the talk examines these questions in more detail. The material presented will introduce novel food sources utilizing by-products of food production, modifying manufacturing processes, developing foods which have additional functions such as health effects, obesity management and yet maintain or improve the quality of the products

Keynote Forum

Alison Burton Shepherd

De Montfort University
UK

Keynote: The impact of sustainable diet on long term health, a review of the evidence.

Time : 09:55-10:20

OMICS International Food Technology-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Alison Burton Shepherd photo
Biography:

Alison Burton-Shepherd is a Registered Nutritionist (Scientist) and Senior Lecturer in Adult Nursing at De Montfort University Leicester UK. She is a part time Advanced Nurse Practitioner and Non Medical Prescriber. Recently, she became an Inspector for the Care Quality Commission inspecting primary medical services to ensure that high standards of clinical care are being maintained. She is proud to be a Queens Nurse a title given to nurses who have achieved and continue to strive for excellence.

Abstract:

The concept of sustainable diets presents an opportunity to successfully advance commitments to sustainable development and the elimination of poverty, food and nutrition insecurity, and poor health outcomes. However, Keats et al (2014) asssert that global dietary patterns have changed dramatically in the past 50 years, presenting both a boom and a threat to the health and well-being of populations everywhere. Moreover, for many different reasons beyond the scope of this presentation, it is suggested that today, people are consuming foods that pose the greatest negative impacts for their health and the environment. Increased incomes are accompanied by increased consumption of diets high in meat, dairy, oil, salt, and processed foods. At the same time, the globalization of the food system has contributed to environmental degradation and biodiversity loss, while lowering prices for diets high in energy but consequently low in variety and important nutrients. Coupled with urbanization and increasing sedentary lifestyles, there is an unprecedented rise in obesity and, subsequently, non-communicable diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and hypertension. These trends reveal an alarming increase of such health issues across low, middle, and high-income countries. Although >1 billion people world-wide are overweight and obese, 868 million people are suffering from hunger, and another 2 billion are suffering from micronutrient deficiencies. As Ballam (2011) suggests, there are many major challenges and no single solutions to assist the population in achieving a sustainable diet. This presenation will seek to address some of these challenges which may be useful in health promotion.

Keynote Forum

Tim Finnigan

Quorn Food
UK

Keynote: Why we need healthy new proteins with a low environmental impact?

Time : 10:20-10:45

OMICS International Food Technology-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tim Finnigan photo
Biography:

Tim Finnigan is currently a Director of R&D for Quorn Foods. He is a PhD graduate of the Food and Biosciences faculty of the University of Reading, England and has held innovation roles in government food research, General Foods, APV, RHM, Zeneca and Premier Foods. He has been instrumental in the product and technology innovation programs that have helped to establish Quorn as the world’s leading meat free brand across 15 countries worldwide.

Abstract:

Something is broken in the way we produce and consume our food. Our food and agriculture now contributes to 30% of global greenhouse gas emissions with half associated with the production of meat. Land and water use are reported to become the new oil in global politics as food security becomes a more pressing risk for a sustainable food future. Half of the world’s antibiotics are fed to industrially farmed animals contributing to the rise of deadly superbugs whilst cereals and crops that could be used nourish the world’s poorest are increasingly grown as animal fodder and a hugely inefficient conversion of protein and environmental damage. There seems no doubt that our desire for ever cheaper and more plentiful meat is at the heart of issues of food sustainability that threaten our very way of life. Indeed, we can no longer meaningfully separate our dietary choices from their impact on the health of our bodies and of the planet. We need to change the balance by eating less and better quality meat and sometimes none at all. We need new ideas and new and healthy proteins with a low environmental impact to help us achieve this. Foods such as Quorn are already helping consumers transition away from an over dependence on meat, in short, we need a culture change

Break: 10:45-11:00
  • Symposium on "Food safety, security and sustainability: The 21st century challenge"

Session Introduction

Malcolm Elliott

The Norman Borlaug Institute for Global Food Security
UK

Title: Food safety, security and sustainability: The 21st century challenge
Speaker
Biography:

Malcolm Elliott graduated with First Class Honors in Plant Sciences from The University of Wales in 1963. His PhD in Plant Biochemistry (1966) was followed by a period as a Fulbright Scholar and Research Staff Biologist at Yale University (1967-1969). He returned from the USA to the post of Lecturer in Plant Biochemistry at The University of Leicester (1969-1971), then he became Professor and Head of The School of Life Sciences at De Montfort University, (1971-1994), Chairman of The College of Deans at De Montfort University (1989-1993) then Founding Director of The Norman Borlaug Institute for Global Food Security (1994 to 2011) and Editor in Chief of the BioMed Central open access journal Agriculture & Food Security (2011 to date). He is the author of several hundred research publications and he has directed the Higher Degree programmes of more than fifty Graduate Students. He was honored by the award of the Charles University Medal (1992), the Gregor Mendel Gold Medal for Biological Sciences Research of Exceptional Merit (1993), the Jan Evangelista Purkyne Medal (1994) and the DSc (Honoris Causa) of the Bulgarian Academy of Agricultural Science (2006).

Abstract:

At the end of October, 2011 United Nations’ demographers observed that the world’s population had reached seven billion. The UN FAO estimated that, in 2010, more than a billion people went to bed hungry or starving every night. The world’s population will approach nine billion by the middle of this Century so we face the supreme challenge of producing much more food on less land with less water, fewer agrochemicals and less energy while maintaining biodiversity and confronting global climate change. It is apparent now, that agriculture must be “sustainable.” We understand this to mean that our agricultural practices across scales of time and space must be in long term balance, meeting human needs with safe, healthy outcomes within the boundaries of our natural resource base. Nineteen seventy Nobel Peace Laureate Norman Borlaug (“The Man Who Fed the World”) initiated the Green Revolution in Agriculture. He championed the application of cutting edge science to crop improvement and in this cause he espoused crop gene manipulation and other state-of-the-art genetic approaches. While there are many approaches to improving and stabilizing agricultural yields and livelihoods and the resilience of agricultural systems, the mandate of food security cuts across the debates

  • Special Session on "AgriFood Antibodies - Immunoassays for Food Safety and Quality Control"
Speaker
Biography:

Sergei A. Eremin is Head of Research Group of Immunoassays. Born in 1954 and received his B.Sc. in Chemistry on 1976 at the Faculty of Chemistry, MSU. He was awarded a Ph.D. degree in organic chemistry on 1982. He is a member of International Association of Environmental Analytical Chemistry and all Russia D.I.Mendeleev Chemical Society; editorial board member of Russian Journal of Analytical Chemistry, Food and Agricultural Immunology, and International Journal of Food Science & Technology.

Abstract:

The chromatography techniques are commonly used now for detection of small molecules like antibiotics, pesticides, dies, detergents and etc. But this techniques are time-consuming could not be made in field conditions. The immunochemical methods like ELISA based on the specific and high affinity antibodies are more widely used for high-throughput screening (HTS) and monitoring of food contaminants. The method of fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) could be used for rapid determination of small molecules. FPIA is based on the competition of an analyte and the analyte labeled with a fluorescent label (tracer) for the binding sites of specific antibodies. In the absence of analytes in the sample the determined fluorescence polarization is maximum and decreases with increasing concentration of analyte. The total time required for an assay is few seconds or minutes. The limit of detection for analyte could be around 10 ng/ml after careful optimization antibodies and fluorescein-labeled tracers. FPIA is simple method in the formulation and allows for a few minutes with both qualitative and quantitative determination of small molecules. The FPIA is an accurate and cost-efficient method which is readily automated and suitable for quantitative detection of multi analytes in one sample. The recent results for development of FPIA for dyes and drugs will be presented. More details about this FPIA method can be found in the review and in some of our recent publications.

Speaker
Biography:

Karsten Haupt studied Biochemistry at the University of Leipzig, Germany. In 1994, he obtained his PhD in Bioengineering from Compiegne University of Technology, France. He then spent several years as a researcher at Lund University, Sweden, where he worked on molecular imprinting. Back in France he was a researcher at INSERM, Paris, before joining the University of Paris 12 as an associate professor. In 2003, he was appointed full professor of Nanobiotechnology at Compiegne University of Technology (UTC), France, where he is now the Head of the CNRS Institute for Enzyme and Cell Engineering. His present research interests include affinity technology, biosensors, synthetic receptors, biomimetic polymers and nanomaterials, for applications in biomedicine, cosmetics, food analysis and security.

Abstract:

Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are synthetic antibody mimics ('plastic antibodies') that specifically recognize molecular targets. They are highly cross-linked polymers that are synthesized through the polymerization of monomers bearing suitable functional groups, in the presence of the target molecule acting as a molecular template. This templating induces three-dimensional binding sites in the polymer that are complementary to the template in terms of size, shape and chemical functionality. Thus, the plastic antibody can recognize and bind its target with an affinity and selectivity similar to a biological antibody. We present here new approaches allowing for the synthesis of MIPs by controlled/living radical polymerization and localized photopolymerization. This results in protein-size, soluble MIP nanogels with a homogeneous size distribution, and allows also the direct synthesis of MIP nanocomposites, and interfacing with transducers. The MIPs show specific binding of their targets, small organic molecules (herbicides, antibiotics, mycotoxins...) or proteins, with a nanomolar affinity and a good selectivity.

Speaker
Biography:

B Ho completed his PhD in Microbiology at University College, Cardiff (currently Cardiff University), Wale and has since returned to work at the National University of Singapore. Ho has more than 30 years of teaching and research experience in bacterial pathogenesis, food microbiology and rapid detection of Gram-negative bacteria. He has published over 170 papers, manyon the understanding of Helicobacter pylori and bacterial endotoxin. He has been serving as a reviewer and as editorial board member of various journals

Abstract:

The route of transmission of Helicobacter pylori,remains elusive. The detection of H. pylori-specific 16S rDNA in different water and food sources indicates its probable “presence” in extra-gastric environments. A study using confocal and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the bacteria were able to form biofilm on lettuce surfaces suggesting the possibility of H. pylori in surviving in the food. Furthermore, in vitro study shows that the biofilm forming ability of H. pylori is strain dependent. This signals the variability in the colonizing ability of H. pyloriin and on different food sources. Interestingly, SEM analysis of the gastric biopsies also revealed the attachment of such biofilm-like structure on the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected patients, an indication that H. pylori is capable of adapting to the biofilm state in both in vitro and in vivo conditions to overcome the unfavourable harsh environments. Our findings are further supported by the presence of H. pylori in sera of patients with gastroduodenal diseases by ELISA using the highly specific monoclonal antibodies against gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. Taken together H. pylori biofilm may play an important role in the survival of H. pylori in extra-gastric environments. Food and water contaminated with H. pylori may serve as a possible source of the presence of H. pylori and that such contaminated food can be a cause for public health concern

Speaker
Biography:

Terry Fodey has extensive experience in the production of antibodies to low molecular weight compounds and has employed these reagents in immunoassays designed to detect contaminating chemicals in food products of animal origin. He became a Graduate of the Royal Society of Chemistry (GRSC) in 1993 at the University of Ulster and obtained his PhD from Queens University Belfast for his thesis in “Novel approaches for the production of specific antibodies to food contaminants” in 2008. He is currently a Research Scientist in the Chemical Surveillance Branch of the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute of Northern Ireland.

Abstract:

Phenylbutazone is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is commonly used to treat horses for the pain associated with musculoskeletal disorders. However the drug is known to cause adverse effects in humans and is therefore not permitted for use in any animal destined for human consumption. In compliance with European legislation, samples from food producing animals are analysed for the presence of the drug and in recent years some equine and bovine samples have proved to be non-compliant. While physicochemical methods of analysis exist there is a need for less expensive, rapid screening methods such as immunoassays. This study describes the production of antisera that could be employed in an immunoassay to detect the two marker residues, phenylbutazone and its main metabolite oxyphenylbutazone. Four haptens were chosen for immunogen preparation and two of these, suxibuzone and γ-hydroxyphenylbutazone produced antisera which had IC50s of <5 ng mL-1 for phenylbutazone. Antisera with IC50’s 5.5 ng mL-1 for phenylbutazone and 5.6 ng mL-1 oxyphenylbutazone were produced by the phenylbutazone and oxyphenylbutazone haptens respectively. These figures suggest that when incorporated in immunoassays the antisera could deliver detection capabilities below the concentration that is recommended by the Community Reference Laboratory (5 ng mL-1).

  • Track 1: Breaking Innovations in Food Science world
    Track 2: Food Safety, Preservation, Quality Standard and Systems Management
    Track 3: Food Processing and Packaging Technologies
    Track 6: Application of Food Technology
Speaker

Chair

Francesca Venturi

University in Pisa
Italy

Speaker

Co-Chair

Lara Hanna Wakim

Holy Spirit University of Kaslik, Lebanon

Speaker
Biography:

Francesca Venturi completed his 1st Ph.D at the age of 28 years from the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa. She is a researcher in Food Technology of Pisa University. In 2008, she received a "Special Mention" at "Montana Premium" for Food Science Research (with her colleague Zinnai A.). She published more than 70 papers in journals or volumes and serving as a referee for ACS journals. She was an author in an Original Patent of Pisa University (RM2010A000617) for extra-virgin olive oil extraction by addition of CO2,s. She was Invited Speaker and Chair at International Conferences.

Abstract:

The influence of glass on wine sensory perception is claimed by many wine connoisseurs but this hypothesis is not fully investigated. On this basis, an experimental activity was developed to put in evidence both the time evolution of sensory profiles of the same wine maintained in different types of glasses and its possible correlation with the changes occurring in both physical and chemical properties of the products. With the aim to better understand how the differences related to the glass type can influence the consumer perception of the wine, the same product was assessed in each glass, at the same moment, for three times (t= 0, 40’, 120’) during every tasting session. The judgments, expressed in each session, were subjected to 2 way ANOVA and PCA analysis. The evolution of wine was also analyzed by chemical and physical points of view with the aim to verify the possibility to correlate some glass properties and chemical/physical changes occurred in wine with the modification of sensory perception of the panelists. On these basis, it was possible to define a final ranking of the glasses and identify which glass has allowed the best expression and evolution of wine sensory properties. Comparing the results obtained utilizing the same glass set for tasting different wines, it could possible to verify how the best combination wine/glass change as a function of the type of wine and which are the main parameters involved in the definition of the best combination glass/wine.

Break: 13:20-14:00
Speaker
Biography:

Johanna Suomi has completed her PhD at the age of 25 from University of Helsinki and worked nine years as senior lecturer at Helsinki University of Technology / Aalto University. Since 2011 she has been working as senior researcher at the Risk Assessment Research Unit of the Finnish Food Safety Authority Evira. Her specialty is risk assessment of chemical hazards in food. She also holds title of Associate Professor at the University of Helsinki. She has published 25 articles in refereed journals as well as scientific reports, monographs and invited articles in books. She is member of an EFSA network.

Abstract:

Cadmium, lead, mercury, and arsenic are toxic to humans, affecting many processes of the same organs in the body. These elements are found as contaminants in practically all food items, but the concentrations vary between foods. Simultaneous exposure to several heavy metals may cause additive damage compared to the effect of a single compound. Cumulative risk assessment has mainly been applied to pesticides, and hardly any research has been carried out on cumulative risks of heavy metal exposure. Interaction of the heavy metals was considered to induce harmful effects on the kidney and on the nervous system. This study concentrates on the cumulative risks of heavy metals among Finnish children of 1, 3 and 6 years and the contribution of heavy metals on nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity. We have determined the levels and the main sources of Cd, Pb, Hg and As exposure. Furthermore, the contribution of these compounds on the cumulative exposure was assessed. Concentration data of the heavy metals in a wide range of foodstuffs as well as individual Finnish consumption data were used to assess the heavy metal intake. Probabilistic exposure assessment was performed with MCRA 8. Further research on the cumulative effects of heavy metals, using the same toxicological endpoint, are needed in the future to check the validity of the assumptions made in this study.

Speaker
Biography:

Ruihong Zhang is a Professor in the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering at University of California, Davis (UC Davis). Dr. Zhang has more than 25 years of research and teaching experiences with bioenergy and biofuel production, waste treatment and environmental quality management and control. She has successfully transferred new technologies from her laboratories to commercial companies. She is now serving as Chief Technology Advisor for CleanWorld, a Sacramento based bioenergy company. She has over 300 scientific publications and seven patents. Dr. Zhang received her PhD degree of Agricultural Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1992. She then joined the faculty of Iowa State University in 1993 and the faculty of UC Davis in 1995. She conducted innovative research and technology development on the production of biofuels and biochemicals from food and agricultural wastes. Dr. Zhang received several prestigious awards, including the New Holland Young Researcher Award from the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers in 2003, Environmental Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 2007, and Distinguished Career Award from Association of Overseas Chinese Agricultural, Biological and Food Engineers in 2010, Achievement Award from California Bioresources Alliance in 2013, and CleanTech Innovator of the Year from Sacramento Regional Technology Alliance (SARTA) in 2014.

Abstract:

The State of California has recently enacted new legislation and policies for accelerating the development of low carbon economy. Many food processors and suppliers have established sustainability goals for their businesses. Diverting food processing residuals and food waste from landfill and converting them into energy, fertilizer and other valuable products is an effective pathway to reduce the carbon footprint and improve the environmental and economic sustainability of food processing facilities and food businesses. UC Davis’s high solids anaerobic digestion technology has made the co-production of renewable natural gas and biofertilizers from food waste possible at commercial scales. The new anaerobic digestion technology has been successfully used in three commercial food wastes to energy projects in the Sacramento region. At full capacities, these facilities convert over 150 tons of food wastes each day into biomethane gas. The biomethane produced at Sacramento Biodigester is currently used as renewable natural gas for trucks and cars and the biogas produced at UC Davis Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digestion facility is used for generating approximately 5.6 GWh of renewable electricity per year. This presentation provides a review of anaerobic digestion technologies and their applications for food waste conversion and highlights the food waste to biogas energy projects that Clean World has in operation.

Speaker
Biography:

Lara Hanna Wakim is an Associate Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences at the Holy Spirit University of Kaslik, Lebanon. She is the Vice-President of the Global Confederation of Higher Education Associations for Agricultural and Life Sciences-2015 and Member of its Steering Committee. She served as Head of Food Science Department at USEK and as Responsible of the International Relations. She has an extensive experience as Food Safety consultant. She is Member of the National Committee of Agri-Food Industries at the Lebanese Ministry of Agriculture, an Active Member at the Lebanese Standards Institution at the Lebanese Ministry of Industry, Member of the Lebanese Association of Food Scientists and Technologists and also Member of the Governing Council of the International Union of Food Science and Technology. Her research interests are primarily focused on consumer perceptions and attitude toward food safety in Lebanon. She holds an Agricultural Engineering Diploma from USEK (Lebanon), an MS in Food Science from the Agence Universitaire de la Francophonie (AUF)/INAP-G (France) and a PhD in Food Process Engineering from AgroParis Tech (France). She holds as well an MA/PG Diploma in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education from University of Chester (UK).

Abstract:

The perception of the consumer in food safety plays an important role in reducing the incidence of food borne diseases. Studies show that young adults aged between 18 and 25 years are more prone to food borne illnesses than adults because of their lack of food safety knowledge. The aim of this study was to measure the degree of university students' awareness in food safety as well as to explore whether there is a relationship or not between the demographic characteristics of university students and their knowledge and practices. A valid questionnaire divided into three parts was distributed to 938 university students aged between 18-25 years living alone or with their parents from different majors and years of study. The data collected was analyzed using the SPSS program. The total scores of the students surveyed were 47.95% on their food safety knowledge and 56.45% on their practices in the matter. The final score of the food safety perception of university students in both genders was 52.2%. Female students scored higher (63.14%) than male students (39.69%) and students majoring in health related fields (67.45%) scored higher than those majoring in areas not related to public health (49.21%). These results showed an overall low level of food safety perception of university students. Educational interventions are needed to improve their food safety knowledge and practices as they will be responsible for their own family one day.

Speaker
Biography:

Francesco Zecca is Associate Professor of Economics and Agricultural Policy. He carries out its teaching and research activities at the Department of Management of the University of Rome La Sapienza.His fields of scientific interest are the sustainability of agrifood production processes , policies of agricultural and rural development , economics of organic produce. He has been Director of MIPAAF(Italian Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Forestry Policies).Member of the ENEA Scientific Council. Representing Italy within the Steering Committee on Agricultural Research of the European Commission. Member of the OECD Governing Body of the programme Biological resource management for sustainable agricultural systems.

Abstract:

Food prices, as a main tool of market regulation, play an important role in the world's economy: on the one hand it provides an availability of food for consumers, on the other hand it is a farmer's income, crucial for their sustainability. Price changes directly affect producer and consumer welfare and may trigger demands by these groups for policy interventions ( Pinstrup -Andersen 2015). In contemporary turbulent time, when sustainable development of rural areas became more and more important, farmers should consider many factors before food pricing, for compensation their costs, and for sustaining the competition of their products (Tosano 2013). This contribution highlights the Italian Traditional Food, it's production, valorisation and it's meaning for rural areas sustainable development. Traditional food is an essential part of cultural and gastronomic heritage and local traditions (Kuhne 2010), and is a part of image of Italian rural territories, attractive for tourists. Traditional foods are thus restricted by the current conditions in the market but they have good perspectives for growing in the future if some challenges are accomplished (Jordana 2000). For traditional food products, the link to the locality of production represents an attribute with added value that marketing and labelling trends to increasingly valorise, including in a global context (de Noronha et al. 2009). CAP(Common Agricultural Policy) changed it' s focus from market orientation to the new economic, social, environmental, climate-related and technological challenges facing our society. It provides many possibilities for sustaining of traditional food production and enabling of rural areas.

Speaker
Biography:

Angela Zinnai completed his 1st Ph.D at the age of 25 years from the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa. She is an associate professor of Food technology of Pisa University. In 2008, she received a “Special Mention” at “Montana Premium” for Food Science Research (with her colleague Venturi F.). She published more than 80 papers in journals or volumes and serving as a referee for research projects and papers. She was a scientific responsibles for an Original Patent (PT2009A000018) that received a “Special mention of the Jury” at 24° SIMEI. She was a chair at Bioprocess 2013 (Kansas City, USA) and at Food Technology 2014 (Las Vegas, USA).

Abstract:

In the last years, many studies have been performed to remark and describe the safety and nutritional quality of extra-virgin olive oil. These properties are strictly connected both to the quality of raw material and to the employed extraction technology which can deeply affect the chemical composition and the sensory characteristics of the virgin olive oil produced. In this experimental work, an innovative extraction technology was set up with the aim to verify the possible influence of different process conditions adopted on the olive oil quality. The operation which marks this new extraction system (patent number RM2010A000617) is the pre-milling addition of solid carbon dioxide CO2,s (carbonic snow) directly to the olives, promoting the olive cryomaceration. After the contact between the CO2,s (sublimation point: T=-78.5°C; P=1atm) and the olives, the cellular water inside the fruits freezes. After freezing, as a consequence of the increase of cellular volume, the cell membrane collapses (cellular crash) while the cellular contents can spill out, enriching the liquid phase with cellular metabolites and oil. The experimental runs show that the addition of the CO2,s seems to improve the extraction yield, which depends on many variables: ripeness degree and water content of the olives, time and conditions adopted during their storage, ratio between cryogen and olives (w/w). Moreover, this innovative technology increase the oil concentration of bioactive compounds (ex: tocopherols, phenols) which play a key role in the quality and health benefits of a virgin olive oil

Speaker
Biography:

Zhongli Pan is a Research Engineer at the Western Regional Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering (BAE), and Director of World Food Center – China at University of California (UC), Davis. He received his Ph.D. degree in Food Engineering from the Department of BAE, UCDavis, in 1998. He had outstanding work experience in academia, research institutions and industry. His current research focuses on the development of new and improved processing technologies for food and agricultural products. He authored more than 250 scientific publications, patents, books and book chapters.

Abstract:

Infrared (IR) radiation heating has been considered as an alternative method for food and agricultural processing to improve product quality and safety, increase energy and processing efficiency, and reduce water and chemical usage. Several novel IR-based technologies have been developed recently by taking advantage of high heat transfer rate of IR radiation for blanching, dehydration and peeling of fruits and vegetables; production of healthy French fries; roasting and pasteurization of almonds; and drying, disinfestation and enzyme inactivation of rice. It was found that IR heating achieved simultaneous blanching and dehydration, eliminated the need for water or steam for blanching, and reduced processing time and energy use. When it is applied to French fry production, the oil content in finished product and frying time were significantly reduced. The Sequential IR and Freeze-Drying (SIRFD) method produced crispy strawberry pieces with a 40 percent reduction of freeze drying time. As a sustainable peeling method without using chemicals and steam, IRdry-peeling produced high quality peeled fruits and vegetables with reduced peeling loss. The Sequential IR and Hot Air (SIRHA) method produced high quality dry-roasted almonds while ensuring pasteurization and significantly reducing roasting time compared to the current hot air roasting method. When IR is used for pasteurizing raw almonds, the treatment retains the characteristics of the raw commodity. IR heating also achieved simultaneous drying, disinfestation and partial enzyme inactivation of rough rice. The development and commercialization of IR-based food processing technologies should open new avenues to delivering safe and value-added foods desirable to consumers, while reducing the consumption of natural resources during processing.

Break: 16:20-16:35
Speaker
Biography:

Bozena Bogucka she has worked as a doctor of agricultural science at the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn since 2002. Her scientific activity has been concentrated on research related to the impact of macro- and microelements on quantitative and qualitative characteristics of potato for the food and processing industry for over 10 years. She has published over 30 works in this field. Her area of interest also includes root food plants storing starch and an additional polysaccharide - inulin.

Abstract:

The amount of starch obtained from potatoes is lower in comparison to cereals. In a sense, nowadays potato starch has become an increasingly frequent alternative to gluten-free flour as a supplement to gluten-free products (dough) and dough concentrates. In the potato (starch) industry, large granules of starch with a diameter >40 μm are the most desirable, as they determine fewer losses during the leaching of starch from potato pulp. The experiments included both edible and starch potato varieties of different maturity classes and different doses of macro- and microelements for soil and foliar application. Analysis was performed on an isolated starch of one granule size. The tests were conducted using a Mastersizer 2000 laser particle size analyser from Malvern Instruments LTD with a Hydro 2000 MU unit, based on small-angle laser light scattering (λ = 633 nm), according to Mie scattering theory. Before the measurement, the starch was dosed into a measuring vessel, and subsequently, ultrasound was applied for 20 seconds. During the measurement, the obscurance was in the range of 10-15%. The apparatus performed 10,000 measurements in each cycle. The results allowed for estimation of small (<20 μm), medium (20-40 μm) and large (>40 μm) fractions. In the study material, large starch grains with a diameter >40 µm were dominant. The largest and the smallest amount of starch grains were produced by late and medium-early maturing potato varieties, respectively. An increase of the concentration of macronutrients resulted in the deterioration of the size structure of starch grains. These studies partly have been published under the title “Effect of different mineral fertilization technologies on the size of starch granules in potato” in the Starch/Stärke 2014, 66, 1–6

Speaker
Biography:

Christine Bosch is a Lecturer in Nutrition at the University of Leeds. She has a strong interest in nutrition related research with focus on the health promoting effects of dietary antioxidants and their mechanism of action in the context of oxidative stress, inflammation and related disorders. She has published more than 40 peer reviewed papers in the field. She has held appointments at the Universities Kiel and Giessen (Germany) and has been awarded a Humboldt Fellowship (2010-2012) for a research stay at Newcastle University (UK).

Abstract:

Sorghum is one of the world’s oldest cultivated crops and is an important staple food source in many sub-Saharan African countries. It is well adapted to low input agricultural systems and provides a valuable source of starch, protein and bioactive compounds to local diets. However, sorghum requires significant water and labour-intensive pre-processing methods in order to make the nutrients bio available for human nutrition. The project aimed at comparing the effect of different processing conditions on the metabolic profile and nutritional value of different sorghum cultivars sourced from Uganda and Nigeria. Purified grain samples were milled and subjected to traditional fermentation, microwaving or boiling, in order to produce sorghum porridge. Starch digestibility, bioactive content, as well as antioxidant activity were analyzed as indicators of potential health effects. Overall, the bioactive content was largely dependent on the country of origin and the grain pigmentation, being significantly higher in red pigmented varieties as well as in Ugandan cultivars. Bioactive levels in fermented porridge samples were markedly higher compared to the porridge resulting from boiling and microwaving. Furthermore, microwaving did not appear to increase starch digestibility when compared to boiling whereas the effect of fermentation on the digestion of starch was largely dependent on the particle size of the grain flour. Present results do not support the hypothesis that microwaving is superior to traditional fermentation methods. Ongoing research addresses the aspect of trace element availability under the different processing conditions

Speaker
Biography:

Sajid Latif is currently a researcher at Universitat Hohenheim

Abstract:

Cassava ranks as world’s fourth most important crop, grown in 105 countries mainly for starchy roots and a staple food for nearly one billion people. Cassava leaves rich in protein (17.7-38.1% dry matter basis) have a major share in 100 million tonnes cassava residue per year. Cassava leaves can be an economical and sustainable source of protein after suitable processing. In the present study, optimization and computational evaluation were made on the mechanical juice extraction from cassava leaves. The influence of input variables such as nozzle diameter 4, 5 and 6 mm, rotational speed of screw press from 18 to 40 rpm were investigated in relation to process efficiency. Higher extraction efficiency was observed with lower motor speed and smaller nozzle diameter.4 mm nozzle diameter and 18 rpm screw press were found to be the optimal conditions for highest efficiency (89.3%). Under these optimized conditions, the average temperature of the press cylinder, press head and juice at steady-state conditions were 31.0, 45.4, and 26.8oC, respectively. The flow behavior of the optimized conditions was simulated under laminar model of non-Newtonian fluid by following Navier-Stokes formulation. The velocity and pressure were estimated at 0.027 m/s and 5.23 bar. This information can be used to develop optimum model of pressing machines for cassava leaves.

Speaker
Biography:

G N Ignatyeva has completed her PhD at the age of 35 years by specialty “Bioorganic Chemistry”. In addition, she developed the following project on "the industrial production of pectin from dry and freshcrust without using alcohol (the pectin price of cost 4,6€/kg), " "the industrial production of persimmon fruit juice and persimmon fruit concentrate(diospyros kaki L.), "the industrial production of melon juice and melon concentrate," "the industrial production of dietary fibres which have shown the inhibition of cell proliferation (HT29). She has published more than 40 papers in scientific journals and patents.

Abstract:

The relationship between turbidity and conductivity in cloudifier juices from citrus, melon, persimmon fruit was offered for automation in processing. Enzymes in the range to maintain cloud stability were used for micelle formation and inactivation of pectinesterase.The application of proposed procedure considerably increased the turbidity to 350÷800FNU in 0,8÷1,1°Brix reconstituted juice. The cloudifier juices andconcentrates contained 0÷0,5ml sediment/L; 0÷0,4% v/v pulp. The turbidity and pulp content in the obtained products not changed by10÷20 min centrifuging. The cloud loss in industry cloudifier concentrates was no more than 21÷38,4% during storage test for. The increase of cloud level of cloudifier juices, concentrates of citrus, melon and persimmon fruit considerably increased their beneficial health properties.

Speaker
Biography:

Zhiguo Li has completed his PhD at the age of 27 years from Jiangsu University and is carrying out postdoctoral studies ofMarie Curie Research Fellow from School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham.His research interest focuses on the evaluation and prevention of mechanical handling damage of fruits and vegetables. He has published 26 papers in reputed journals (cited 141 times) andbeen authorized 4 national invention patents. Dr.Li was invited to be Reviewer of 14 international journals in food engineering and Editorial Board Member of 2 open access journals.

Abstract:

It would be scientifically and commercially valuable to understand how external mechanical damage to fruit causes internal cellular damage and other changes that lead to bruising. This requires multi-scale geometrical modelling and FEA simulations linking the macroscopic (whole fruit) scale through the mesoscopic (tissue) scale to the microscopic (cellular) scale. As a first step in such modelling, the anatomical characteristics of a commercial tomato variety were reviewed.Subsequently, some key technologies to simplify an anatomical model of a real tomato fruit for geometrical modelling are discussed in detail. It mainly includesi) what components should be included in a multiscalegeometrical model of whole fruit? ii) how to create the asymmetric and irregular structure and curved contour line of fruit at different scales; iii) howto connect the boundaries between different tissues in a whole fruit model; iv) how best to represent the cells in specific tissues, this relates to the vibration in tissue thickness, cell size, shape and arrangement, cell wall thickness and protoplast; v) how to handle the effect of locular cavity and some spaces between cells on the simulation result in FEA. In summary, it is important to simplify an anatomical model of a real tomato fruit for geometrical modelling. A more complex model might be more accurate but take a long time to compute using FEA. Using these new simplifications a potential improvement in model accuracy would be achieved within existing computing power. Those simplified methods might also be suitable for geometrical modelling of other fruits.

Speaker
Biography:

Azmil Haizam Ahmad Tarmizi is a Senior Research Officer at the Malaysian Palm Oil Board. He joined the organisation in 2004 after obtaining his Master’s degree in Bioprocess Engineering from the University of Technology Malaysia. In 2012, he earned his Ph.D degree in Food and Nutritional Sciences from the University of Reading UK. Azmil’s major research areas are focussing on the frying process and technology, quality of oils and fats, and palm based reference materials. He has published more than 20 peer reviewed and technical papers, and presented many papers in local and international conferences

Abstract:

Comparative frying studies for processing of extruded product were conducted under continuous and intermittent frying conditions. The former – which simulates the industrial production of snack food – was conducted using a pilot scale continuous fryer while the latter (constituted as control experiments) was performed using batch fryers. Thermal stability of palm olein was evaluated at 155oC across 8 h day-1 for a total of 5 days. Continuous frying tends to reduce the free fatty acid by more than two folds compared to intermittent frying. Smoke point is inversely correlated with the oil acidity, and continuous frying resulted in higher smoke point (188 oC) in comparison to its counterpart (177 oC). Interestingly, palm olein used for continuous frying gave the induction period of greater than 23 h regardless to frying intervals: the values obtained were relatively similar to that of fresh palm olein (27.4 h). On the other hand, repeated frying exhibited a gradual decrease in the induction periodat the end of frying session (12.2 h). Frying at lower temperature provides opportunity for palm olein to retain almost three quarters of its initial tocols during continuous frying. Nevertheless, this is not true for intermittent frying because only 27% of tocols remained after 5 days of operation. The levels of polar and polymer compounds were minimal and comparable in both frying protocols. In conclusion, continuous frying demonstrated higher resistance against thermolytic, oxidative and polymeric reactions and hence improves the usability of palm olein under prolonged frying operations