Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 15th International Conference on Food Processing & Technology Rome, Italy.

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Day 3 :

  • ORAL SESSION (The Chemistry of Food Ingredients| Investment in Food Technology | Food & Public Health | Food Laws Policy & Governance| Food Waste Management )
Speaker

Chair

Amiza Mat Amin

University Malaysia Terengganu, Malaysia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Robin Chiou

National Chiayi University, Taiwan

Session Introduction

Ursula Wölwer-Rieck

Institute of Nutrition and Food Sciences
Germany

Title: Naturality and processing of Stevia

Time : 9:30-9:50

Speaker
Biography:

She has completed her PhD from Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Germany. She is a food chemist and tenured academic Councilor in the Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Bonn.   Her academic research  is focused on steviol glycosides, the natural origin sweet compounds of the stevia plant. She has published several papers on the analysis of steviol glycosides and their stability in food. Dr. Ursula Wölwer-Rieck is also a board member of the European Stevia Association (EUSTAS). 

 

Abstract:

Steviol glycosides, natural sweeteners of the shrub Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni, have been authorised in Europe as sweeteners with a purity of more than 95%, since 2011. Their use is widespread worldwide in the food industry and is still growing as they are, in contrast to high intensity artificial sweeteners, of natural origin and stable during food processing.Their manufacturing process is laid down in the EU Regulation 1131/2011 and starts with hot water extraction of the dried leaves, followed by several purification steps to remove further constituents of the plant. After crystallisation and spray drying a white powder with a purity of 95% is obtained. The purpose of this work was to show that all processing steps do not affect the chemical identity of steviol glycosides.Three different sample batches provided by PureCircle, each containing the dried leaves, the first water extract and the end product with more than 95% purity of the same production batch were analysed  by UV-HPLC on a RP- and a HILIC-column as well. The USP-standard containing nine steviol glycosides as described by JECFA (2010) was used as reference.It was possible to separate and identify eight steviol glycosides on the RP-phase within seven minutes, while rebaudioside D was clearly detected on the HILIC-column.All of the nine steviol glycosides required by JECFA were detected in the leaves, water extract and the 95% high purity end product of each of the corresponding production batches. These data indicate that steviol glycosides are not affected nor is their chemical identity modified by the manufacturing process, providing evidence for the naturality of high purity stevia leaf extract sweeteners.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Muyiwa Akintoye is currently Head of a Research and Development with Quorn Foods. He has gained experience over the years in Food Research and Food Manufacture methods in areas as diverse as canning, breakfast cereals, brewing, dairy etc. He studied for a PhD from the University of Leeds between 2003& 2007 and has been with Quorn Foods since 1993. He has responsibility for establishing and driving forward R&D programs and activities that are business value enhancing whilst maintaining and establishing a solid scientific basis for these activities.

Tim Finnigan is a PhD graduate of the Food and Biosciences Faculty, University of Reading, England and has held innovation roles in UK government food research, Kraft General Foods, APV, RHM, Zeneca and Premier Foods. He has been instrumental in the product and technology innovation programs that have helped to establish Quorn as the world’s leading meat free brand. As a holder of many key business patents, he drives a vibrant industrial and academic research and development program within a network of key opinion leaders who help share the current hot topics of nutrition research and biotechnology alongside developing an understanding of a sustainable food future.

 

Abstract:

Something is broken in the way we produce and consume our food. Our food and agriculture now contributes to 30% of global greenhouse gas emissions with half associated with production of meat. Land and water use are reported to become the new oil in global politics as food security becomes a more pressing risk for a sustainable food future. Half the world’s antibiotics are fed to industrially farmed animals contributing to the rise of deadly superbugs whilst cereals and crops that could be used nourish the world’s poorest are increasingly grown as animal fodder and a hugely inefficient conversion of protein and environmental damage.  There seems no doubt that our desire for ever cheaper and more plentiful meat is at the heart of issues of food sustainability that threaten our very way of life.  Indeed, we can no longer meaningfully separate our dietary choices from their impact on the health of our bodies and of the planet. We need to change the balance by eating less and better quality meat and sometimes none at all.  We need new ideas and new and healthy proteins with a low environmental impact to help us achieve this.  Biotechnology can be used successfully to deliver this global imperative with Foods such as Quorn already available in over 16 countries worldwide and helping consumers transition away from an over dependence on meat – in short , we need a culture change.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Robin Y Y Chiou has completed his PhD in 1985 from Department of Food Science, University of Georgia, USA. He is a distinguished Professor with Department of Food Science, National Chiayi University. He has published more than 120 papers in scientific periodicals and 2012 Fellow of American Peanut Research and Education Society.

Abstract:

In addition to general names, “peanut also named life longer nut” has been recorded in old Chinese archives and attracted research interest. In this study, wound-stress was applied to enhance biosynthesis of stilbenoids in preparation of bio-activated peanut sprout powder (BPSP). Through medium pressure liquid chromatographic fractionation and followed by semi-preparative HPLC purification, two new stilbenoids, namely, arahypin 16 and arahypin 17 along with 5 known stilbenoids, i.e., resveratrol, arachidin-1, arachidin-3, isopentadienylresveratrol and arahypin 5 were isolated and identified. After subjection of the 7 stilbenoids to antiglycative activity determination, all have exhibited inhibitory activities and varied with structure-activity nature. When BPSP was supplemented with normal diets at doses up to 6.4 g/kg b. w. and used to feed male and female ICR mice for 28 days, changes of the body weights, relative organ weights, blood and biochemical analyses revealed no obvious health hazard or acute toxicity. In longevity assessments, 11-mon-old BALB/c and 12-mon-old ICR mice were respectively fed with BPSP-supplemented diets at doses of 0 (control), 0.1 and 0.5 g BPSP/kg b. w. for 750 and 762 days, based on the resultant survival curves and average lifespans, it is of merit to demonstrate that BPSP was effective to extend mouse longevity by a dose-dependent manner and of potency to be a health enhancing ingredient.

Speaker
Biography:

She received her Ph.D. from Atatürk University, Turkey. She is an AssociateProfessor at thedepartment of Food Engineering in Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey. She has been working on food microbiology and biotechnology.

Abstract:

Gelatin is a multipurpose food additive widely used in the food industry.It is a hidrolized protein that produced through acid and alkaline extraction of collagen from animal tissues such as pig skin, bovine hides and their bones. Consumers may have some hesitations about the animal derived gelatin use in food and pharmacological products. Since in Islamic–beliefs, consuming of products derived from non-halal sources is certainly forbidden, instead of animal derived gelatin, alternative gelatin sources must be developed to contribute to the protection of religious precision.Recently, recombinant collagen has been expressed in microbial hosts, and became one of the most popular collagen alternative especially for medical applications.In this research,a bovine collagen gene fragmentwas transcribed in a yeast expression systemto produce bovine recombinant gelatinfor the food industry.For this purpose,a 1000bplength fragment of bovine (Bostaurus) collagen, COL1A1 genewas transferred to Pichiapastoris KM71 yeast strain cells by electroporation, and transcription of the gene fragment was checked by PCR. Approximately 1000bp PCR productwas obtained as targeted gene fragment, and accuracy of the PCR products was controlled by sequence analysis. When the nucleotid sequence searched from GenBank database, a 99% alignment observed with Bostaurus COL1A1 gene sequence.Consequently, a target bovine collagen gene fragment was successfully transcribed in P.pastoris as a one of the most important step of recombinant collagen production but there is more research needed to achieve optimal functional recombinant collagen/gelatinefor the industry.

Gabriele Di Giacomo

University of L’Aquila, Italy

Title: Food quality, food packaging and food waste reduction

Time : 10:50:11:10

Speaker
Biography:

Gabriele Di Giacomo is a full Professor of Chemical Engineering at University of L’Aquila (Italy). He is the author of more than 100 scientific papers, conference papers and patents. His research interests include phase equilibria and transfer phenomena; supercritical fluids and applications; food waste management and valorization; sites remediation; seawater desalination; renewable energy and bio-fuels; processing of foods and beverages.

Abstract:

The quality of the ready-to-eat and of the minimally processed food (MPF) is strictly related to the packaging, often made by composite materials, including non-biodegradable ones. This complicates the use of the food waste (FW) as raw materials and, consequently, the possibility of reducing their final amount. To overcome this problem the packaging should be made by only biodegradable (possibly eatable) materials but, at the same time, it should have adequate properties: mechanical resistance, impermeability to oxygen, UV-resistance, porosity, and others depending on the specific food. Actually, in the rural society all these conditions were satisfied when packaging or covering food to be preserved for a given time under specified conditions. Moreover, most of the packages were made using byproducts or waste of primary food productions. The modern and industrialized society should restart from this point, identifying a number of raw materials and proper technologies to develop effective food packaging in order to ensure food quality and safety and to reduce the amount of FW. The purpose of this contribution is to show and to discuss a number of significant cases where surplus, byproducts and waste can be successfully used for the industrial production of edible films and biodegradable food packages having properties predetermined on the base of: a) the nature of the food; b) the properties to be preserved; c) the time of preservation. Significant examples of raw materials are: the collagen derived for the internal membrane of the eggshell and the PHA derived from the lactose of whey.

Break: Networking & Refreshments 11:10-11:25
Speaker
Biography:

Majid Rahemi is currently a Professor at the Department of Horticultural Science, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Iran. He has earned a PhD degree in Horticulture from Michigan State University. His research emphasises on Plant Physiology, Horticulture and Post-Harvest Technology. 

Abstract:

Despite the fact that dried fig is considered as an important export product, it can provide a suitable media for growth of toxic spores. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the aflatoxin content in Ficus carica L. cv. sabz at different stages of fruit harvest (before abscission from tree, abscission on net, falling on the ground, drying on eshpang and in the cold storage) with HPLC. Aflatoxin was not detected at the mentioned phases. Although, infected aflatoxin was detected in infected samples, the concentration of the toxin was lower than Iranian national standard (6872). Samples infected with given concentration of Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavous revealed the aflatoxin content, which was higher than the standard content. According to the results, it was recommended that the growers were supposed to collect the fig fruits as soon as possible in the late season, in summer for avoiding exposure to percipitation condition. Also, the product ought to be kept in cold storage with controlled temperature and humidity as well as in the disinfected area. 

Zahra Yousefi

Agricultural and Natural Resources Education Research Center of Guilan, Rasht, Iran

Title: Investigation on drying kinetic, effective diffusivity coefficient and activation energy in shelled hazelnut (Corylus avellana) drying process

Time : 11:45-12:05

Speaker
Biography:

Zahra Yousefi has completed her PhD from Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University. She is the Boss of Roudbar Olive Research Station of Iran. She has published more than 6 papers in reputed journals. 

Abstract:

The goal of this research was to study kinetic of shelled hazelnut at temperature range of 40-60°C that beside drawing curve of moisture changes at different temperature and modeling frying process, effective diffusivity coefficient, activation energy, total energy, specific energy required for drying shelled hazelnut was calculated in single-layer form. Result of consideration showed that the duration of drying at 60°C was 34.42 and 20 percent less than 40 and 50°C. In modeling the process of drying hazelnut Midilli et al in 3 temperatures of drying has had the most suitable fitting with data of experiment comparing to other models. Also, effective distribution coefficient in dried hazelnut samples at different temperature changes between 1.26373×10-10 and 1.50064×10-10 m2/s. Activation energy for hazelnut at temperature range of 40-60°C 29.622 KJ/kg and effective penetration constant was obtained 1.1×10-5.

Aziz Houmayuni

Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Title: Probiotic dairy products; A changing outlook from consumer and producer

Time : 12:05-12:25

Speaker
Biography:

Aziz Homayouni Rad has received his PhD in Food Science and Technology Engineering at Tehran University during 2003-2007. Currently, he is working as Associate Professor in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. He has successfully completed his administrative responsibilities as Vice Chancellor of Education in the Nutrition Faculty. His research has included functional food with emphasis on probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic dairy foods. Based on this research and fellowship training, he has received several awards and honors, such as “Top Researcher in Nutrition Faculty of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences at 2013” and “Journal of Dairy Science Most-cited Award in Dairy Foods in 2014”. He is serving as an Editorial Board Member of several reputed journals like Journal of Food Research and expert Reviewers for journals like “Food Chemistry” and “Nutrition”. He has authored more than 80 research articles and more than 8 books. He is a member of Iranian Probiotic Association.

Abstract:

In recent years, the attention of scientific investigators has moved from the primary role of food as the source of energy and nutrients to the action of biologically active food components on human health. On the other hand, the consumer interest about the active role of food in the well-being and life prolongation has been increased. In this way, a novel term-functional food-was introduced which refers to prevention and/or curing effects of food beyond its nutritional value. There is a wide range of functional foods that were developed recently and many of them are being produced in all over the world including probiotic, prebiotic and symbiotic foods as well as foods enriched with antioxidants, isoflavones, phytosterol, anthocyanin and also foods with reduced sucrose, salt and fat content. Among these foods, probiotic functional foods may exert positive effects on the overall health. We can divide the probiotic functional foods into probiotic dairy foods and probiotic non-dairy foods. The market of probiotic dairy foods is increasing annually. An increased demand for dairy probiotic products comes from health promotion effects of probiotic bacteria that are originally initiated from milk products, bioactive compounds of fermented dairy products and prevention of lactose intolerance. Therefore, the development of these products is a key research priority for food design and a challenge for both industry and science sectors. This article presents an overview of functional foods development with emphasizing on probiotic dairy foods.

  • Young Researcher Forum
Speaker
Biography:

She is a 3rd year PhD student in the Industry Transformation Training Centre at the University of Queensland, Australia. She graduated her Bachelor of Science in Nutritional Sciences and Master of Science in Food Technology and Biotechnology at the Technical University Munich, Germany in 2013.

 

Abstract:

The textural and flavor qualities of packaged pre-cooked rice (PPC) is often considered inferior compared to freshly cooked rice. Our aim is to determine specifically the origin of any physicochemical differences that arise during processing of PPC that ultimately affects quality. To achieve this, it has been necessary to develop techniques to measure the mechanical and surface properties of individual rice grains due to the insensitivity of the commonly used texture profile analysis. Single grains were compressed within the elastic limit, i.e. to a non-destructive small strain deformation. We found wide distributions of modulus and adhesion, whereby the significant differences of their mean are affected by thermal sterilization time and the addition of oil before sterilization. In addition, cohesion in bulk of PPC was measured with a ring-shear tester designed to measure flow properties. Rinsing before thermal sterilization affect the moisture, but not the modulus, adhesion or cohesion of bulk. In conclusion, measuring intrinsic mechanical properties at the individual grain level paves the way towards rational design and evaluation of processing and ingredient variables on the quality of cooked rice. Keeping the thermal processing time to a minimum produces PPC more similar to freshly cooked rice, and the addition of oil facilitates the flowability during handling by reducing grain-grain adhesion.

 

Speaker
Biography:

She received her bachelor’s degree from University of Celal Bayar in Department of Food Engineering, Manisa, in 2011 and also received her master degree from University of Ankara in Department of Food Engineering, Ankara, in 2014. She is also a postgraduate in Department of Food Engineering at Yildiz Technical University, Istanbul. She has worked as a researcher at Tubitak Mrc Food Institute since 2012.

Abstract:

Roots and rhizomes of Glycrrhiza species, commonly known as licorice (liquorice), have been used for medicinal purposes for long years and have also been used as a natural sweetener and a flavor additive in foods and beverages such coke. Licorice has a variety of effects, such as antioxidant, antiviral, anticarcinogenic, antitumor, anti-inflamatuar, anti-depressant and anti-diabetic etc. Glycrrhiza glabra L. has commonly been grown in nearly all regions-especially Mediterranean and Southeast regions- of our country, Turkey.  In this study, new LC-MS/MS method for identification and determination of glycyrrhizin, glycrrhitinic acid, liquiritin and carbenoxolone in licorice was developed. This four compounds in licorice extracted by using ultrasonic water bath with 20%, 50%, 80%, 100% ethanol - water and methanol-water mixtures at room temperature for 45 min. Then, extracts obtained in this way, were filtered and diluted before being injected into the LC system. According to average of three replicates of nine samples, max value of glycrrhizin was 696,35±3,31 mg g-1 in 20% methanol-water mixture, min value of glycrrhizin was 176,50±1,05 mg g-1 in 100% methanol; max value of glycrrhitinic acid was 340,24±0,06 µg g-1 in 50% methanol-water mixture, min value of glycrrhitinic acid was under the limits of quantitation in 100% ethanol and in 100% water; max value of liquiritin was 73,53±2,03 µg g-1 in 20% ethanol-water mixture, min value of liquiritin was under the limits of quantitation in 100% ethanol; carbenoxolone was not detected. Consequently, this method is simple, rapid and effective for identification and determination of these bioactive and allergenic compounds.

Break: Lunch Break 13:00-14:00
Speaker
Biography:

Geana Elisabeta-Irina has completed his PhD in 2015 at Bucharest University. The main current interests are identification and quantification of essential active principles like phenolic compounds, organic acids, amino acids, terpenes, micro and macronutrients in different food matrices (wine, honey, fruits, plants, organic products, functional foods) by highlighting key biomarkers used in authentication, using the main instrumental analytical (HPLC, UV-VIS, ICP-MS). She has published 16 ISI articles, 10 of them as first author), 145 citations, ResearchGate: Irina Geana, researcherID: B-5799-2012, SCOPUS ID: 56005766400

Abstract:

Apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.), a popular and widely cultivated fruit world-wide, contains active phytochemicals including phenolic compounds and triterpenoids responsible for their health benefits. Here we report the results obtained for the concentration of two major triterpenes (oleanolic and ursolic acids), phenolic, flavan-3-ols, flavonoids and bioactive properties of different apple cultivars from different geographical regions and classification using chemometric analysis. Quantification of bioactive compounds from apples was carried out by HPLC-PDA after an appropriate extraction method. Total polyphenols, total flavonoids and antioxidant activity were recorder by spectrophotometric measurements. Our results demonstrated that the investigated bioactive compounds and bioactive properties vary considerably depending on the apple cultivars. Catechin, epicatechin, chlorogenic acid and rutin were the most important identified phenolic acids in apples (flesh and peel), while ursolic and oleanolic acids were abundant in apple peel. There were significant linear correlations between phenolic content and antioxidant activity of extracts in the reaction with DPPH• (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl). A linear discriminant analysis model was constructed to classify apples according to the cultivar and to distinguish between different sample locations. Therefore, the present methodology based on apple active phytochemicals fingerprinting and bioactive properties in conjunction with a comprehensive database and chemometric methods presents a high potential for apple classification.

Speaker
Biography:

She is the third year Phd student in the Faculty of Agricultural Technology Gadjah Mada University. She  is now completing the final stages of research and was writing a dissertation. He is currently working as a lecturer in Health and Nutrition Department, Faculty of Medicine, Gadjah Mada University. For approximately 13 years as a lecturer, she has conducted research and publish papers through national journals, international journals and international conferences in various countries.

Abstract:

Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Chemotherapy is the main method of breast cancer treatment but there are side effects. Carica papaya leaves is vegetable foods consumed by most people of Indonesia have potential as anticancer. The aim of this study was to investigate antiproliferative effects and apoptotic induced effect of aqueous papaya leaves extracts on human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7. Inhibitory on cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay while apoptosis induction was measured using Annexin V. The results showed that papaya leaf can inhibit the proliferation of human breast cancer cells MCF-7 with IC50 in 1,319 µg/ml. IC50 values of papaya leaf extract was higher than the IC50 value quercetin and doxorubicin. Papaya leaf extract can also induce apoptosis of breast cancer cells MCF-7 about 22.54% for concentration 659.63 µg/ml and about 20.73% for concentration 329.81 µg/ml. The percentage of cell apoptosis of papaya leaf extract lower than doxorubicin but higher than quercetin. This study indicated that papaya leaf extract have potential as anticancer through mechanism anti-proliferation and apoptosis induction.

Speaker
Biography:

Ashwini recently graduated with a PhD majoring in Food Science from Monash University Malaysia. She was under the supervision of Dr.Wee Sim Choo and Prof.Gary A. Dykes at the School of Science. She completed her BSc (Hons) Biotechnology at AIMST University, Malaysia with a First-Class Honours and obtained her Masters in Biotechnology from Macquarie University, Australia. Her areas of research interest are mainly on the production of functional foods and  application of plant secondary metabolites in food processing to improve consumer food products.
 

Abstract:

The search for natural colourants has been driven by the growing evidence of the adverse health effects of synthetic colorants. Red pitahaya or red dragon fruit (Hylocereuspolyrhizus) are well known for their deep purple colour pulps due to the abundance of betacyanins and can be exploited as a potential source of natural food colourant. The application of betacyanins from red pitahaya to simulate strawberry-red colour in two model food systems (yoghurt and ice cream) was evaluated in comparison to a commercial colourant from red beet, E-162. A greater loss of BC and total colour changes was observed yoghurt containing E-162. However, an approximate 0.15% increase of BC was observed in ice cream containing betacyanins from red pitahaya or E-162 on day-21 of storage at -18°C. Throughout the 14-days or 21-days of cold storage, only a small difference (ΔE* < 1.5) was observed in total colour changes of yoghurt or ice cream containing betacyanins from red pitahaya or E-162, respectively. The microbial viability (Streptococcusthermophilus and Lactobacillusbulgaricus) in yoghurt containing betacyanins was found to be better than that of plain yoghurt (without betacyanins). Yoghurts containing betacyanins (red pitahaya or E-162) were also found to have lower syneresis than that of plain yoghurt. Ice-cream containing betacyanins from red pitahaya was found to have higher overruns compared to those of plain or E-162 containing ice-cream while the apparent viscosity of ice-creams was not affected by the addition of betacyanins from red pitahaya or E-162. The addition of betacyanins from red pitahaya or E-162 was found to enhance the antioxidant properties of yoghurt and ice cream. The sensory evaluation of yoghurt and ice cream containing betacyanins from red pitahaya showed a better colour acceptability compared to those containing E-162. Betacyanins from red pitahaya can therefore be used as a potential natural colourant to simulate strawberry-red colour in yoghurt and ice cream. 

Speaker
Biography:

Ali Akbar Motedayen is currently a PhD candidate in the University of Montpellier, France. His thesis work is related to the self-assembly of hydrophobic materials for the fabrication of hybrid nano-enabled multilayer food packaging films. He has completed his MSc in the field of food science and industry working on the developpment of novel biodegradable composite films from starch and Kefiran and published a scientific article on that subject in the “Food Chemistry” journal. Nanocomposite and biodegrdable films and their application for extending shelf life of food products are his field of interest.

Abstract:

The purpose of this study is to develop a novel strategy to fabricate linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE)-Organically modified Montmorillonite clay (OMMT) stratified composite films to reinforce the PE packaging materials and improve its functional properties. This strategy consists of assembling OMMT layers on PE surfaces based on solvophobic molecular construction involving hydrophobic interactions between the organic parts of the organoclay tactoids and the PE hydrophobic surfaces and further physical adsorption of LLDPE molecules on the organoclay layers driven by a dip-coating process. The successful preparation of the multilayers was confirmed by the prolfilometry and the scanning electron microscopy characterization results showing a linear growth of repetitive bilayers comprised of 450 nm OMMT and 2.25 µm LLDPE layers on the 160 µm LLDPE substrate film. Moreover, the alternate variation of water contact angles (85° average for OMMT and 107° for LLDPE layers) proved the nature of each layer material. Up to 5 bilayers were deposited on each side of the substrate by successive repeating depositions resulting in robust hybrid multilayer composite films. Further characterization results suggest that the developed self-assembly process can be used as an effective strategy to achieve enhanced barrier effect and that films prepared with such complexes have great potential as food packaging materials.

I.H. R. Uthpala

Post Graduate Institute of Agriculture
University of Peradeniya
Sri Lanka

Title: Effect of postharvest handling operations of oil palm fruits (Elaeis guineensis) on quality of crude palm oil

Time : 15:00-15-15

Speaker
Biography:

Uthpala has completed her B.Sc at the age of 26 years from University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka in the stream of Food Science and Technology as well as is reading M.Sc in the same university. This reaserch has been done at AEN Palm Oil Processing (Pvt) Ltd, Baduraliya, Sri Lanka with the advise of Mr. P.C. Arampath and Mr.(Eng) M. S. Bandara. She is the Quality Assurance executive in leading palm oil manufacturing organization, AEN Palm Oil Processing (Pvt) ltd, Sri Lanka. She has written manuscripts, research papers, reviews related to food technology. 

Abstract:

In Sri Lanka, palm oil cultivation and processing of palm oil fruits has been operated as a commercial scale since last decade. Effect of postharvest handling operations of palm oil fruits such as transportation, temporary storage at the ramp, damages occurred during the transport and handling of fresh fruit bunches (FFB) were investigated in crude palm oil (CPO). The quality of CPO is mostly determined based on free fatty acid (FFA), moisture and impurities content. FFB of palm oil stored for 6, 12 , 18 hours  with different percentage of fruit damages (0% , 20%, 40% & 60%)  were determined.  There was a direct relationship between FFA content and storage period (r = 0.993). There was no significant effect of fruits received by normal transportation on FFA and moisture content (p<0.05). The interactive effect of palm oil fruits damage and storage period on FFA was significant (p<0.05).  There was a significant effect of fruit damage on FFA content of CPO (p<0.05). The FFA and moisture content of CPO is positively correlated with the storage period of palm oil fruits and moisture content is negatively correlated with the damage percentage of oil palm fruit. Harvested palm oil fruits at 0 % surface damage can be stored for 57 h which comply with the quality standard (FFA < 5%, moisture < 0.3% and   impurities  <0.2 %).

 

Rachid Atmani

Hassan II University of Casablanca
Morocco

Title: Diffusion modeling of heptane in polyethylene vinyl acetate

Time : 15:15-15:30

Speaker
Biography:

Rachid Atmani is responsible for Culture and Sports Cell of Network, PhD student of the FSB, "Doc Net-FSB" and PhD student in Chemistry Research and Development (CRD) Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry and Physico-Chemistry of Materials; Faculty of Sciences Ben M'Sik; Hassan II University of Casablanca, Morocco.

Abstract:

The aim of this work is to describe the mass transfer in food packaging, when the plastic is brought into contact with food, certain transfers of chemical occurs according to a complex process. In this work, we coupled modeling with experimental approach in order to understand the transfer through the plastic interface of food packaging. The numerical model takes into account the result obtained in an experimental study. The kinetics of diffusion transfer and diffusivity of heptane (simulator oils) in our model was determined. The analytical and numerical model has been developed in order to give better information on the concentration of liquid inside the package (PEVA) and simulate in a few hours the transfer that occurs several months.

  • Award Ceremony & Closing Remarks 15:30-16:00
    Networking & Refreshments 16:00-16:15
    Conference Adjournment